Vicálvaro

Vicálvaro is a district in the southeast of Madrid, Spain. It is named after the former municipality absorbed into the municipality of Madrid in 1951.

Vicálvaro
Location of Vicálvaro
Coordinates: 40°24′15″N 3°36′29″W / 40.4042°N 3.60806°W / 40.4042; -3.60806Coordinates: 40°24′15″N 3°36′29″W / 40.4042°N 3.60806°W / 40.4042; -3.60806
CountrySpain Spain
Aut. community Madrid
MunicipalityEscudo de Madrid.svg Madrid
Government
 • ConcejalMartin Casariego Córdoba (PP)
Area
 • Total32.71 km2 (12.63 sq mi)
Population
70,051
Madrid district number19
Address of councilPlaza Don Antonio de Andrés
WebsiteMunimadrid Vicálvaro
Main street through the Casco Histórico in 2019
Vicálvaro, May 2019

HistoryEdit

When Spain's Civil Guard (Spanish: Guardia Civil) was established in 1844, the first headquarters of its cavalry was in Vicálvaro. Franco converted it into an artillery barracks for the Brunete Armored Division, Regiment No. 11. The building is now part of the Rey Juan Carlos University.

Vicálvaro was the site of Leopoldo O'Donnell's 1854 coup known as La Vicalvarada,[1] which began Spain's Bienio progresista.

In 2011, a Visigothic necropolis was uncovered in Vicálvaro.[2]

GeographyEdit

PositionEdit

VIcálvaro is bordered on the west by the district of Moratalaz (across the Autopista de Circunvalación M-40), on the north by San Blas (across the M-40, the Avenida de Canillejas a Vicálvaro, the Autopista Radial 3 and the Vicálvaro-Coslada Highway), on the south by the Puente de Vallecas and the Villa de Vallecas (across Autovía A-3) and on the east by the municipalities of Coslada, San Fernando de Henares and Rivas-Vaciamadrid.

SubdivisionEdit

Since 2017, the district is formed by 4 neighborhoods: Casco Histórico de Vicálvaro, Valderrivas, Valdebernardo and El Cañaveral.[3][4] and the territory became part of the Casco Histórico de Vicálvaro neighborhood. The district formerly comprised only two neighborhoods: Ambroz and Casco Histórico de Vicálvaro (historic Vicálvaro)

The former municipality of Vicálvaro was absorbed into Madrid in 1951. Around its historic center are the nearby neighborhoods (known locally as poblados, colonias or barrios) of San Juan, Mil Viviendas, Las Cruces y Anillo Verde. Several of these cross the boundary between the two official barrios. West of the historic center of Vicálvaro, but entirely within the official barrio of Vicálvaro, is a second center at Valdebernardo, developed in the 1990s.

Finally, since 1998, Valderrivas has been developed on the land of a former cement factory operated 1923–1995 by Cementos Portland Valderrivas. This also falls within the official barrio of Vicálvaro. Portland moved their cement production to Morata de Tajuña because municipal ordinances raised increasing environmental issues. They sold their land, 40 percent of which was granted permits as being suitable for urban development; Portland also took charge of the ensuing construction. In the process, they tore down the chimney that had for decades been emblematic of Vicálvaro. Also in the Valderrivas area is a new neighborhood called La Catalana, near the border with of the Coslada district. La Catalana is mainly commercial.

Public TransportEdit

In the late 1990s, an extension of the Line 9 of the Metro Madrid from Pavones to Arganda del Rey was opened to the public, with passengers having to change trains at Puerta de Arganda station in order to continue their journey. Most characteristic for the new stations of Valdebernardo, Vicálvaro, San Cipriano and Puerta de Arganda are their distinctly coloured walls, an innovation aimed at making it less likely for passengers to accidentally miss their stop. Many subsequently constructed or renovated stations of the Metro system now use that same technique.

It is important to distinguish between the Metro Vicálvaro (situated in the centre of the Casco Histórico) and the train station Vicálvaro (situated above the Metro Puerta de Arganda).

GalleryEdit


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Introducción a la Historia de Vicálvaro, vicusalbus.org. Retrieved 2010-02-26.
  2. ^ Fraguas, Rafael (7 July 2011). "Hallada en Vicálvaro una necrópolis visigoda con 900 enterramientos" [Visigoth necropolis with 900 tombs found in Vicálvaro]. El País. Retrieved 18 July 2011.
  3. ^ "Madrid suma 131 barrios con Valdebernardo, Valderrivas y El Cañaveral". Diario de Madrid. Ayuntamiento de Madrid. 10 November 2017. [Madrid has 131 neighborhoods with Valdebernardo, Valderrivas and El Cañaveral]
  4. ^ Ayuntamiento de Madrid: "Acuerdo del Pleno, de 31 de octubre de 2017, por el que se aprueba la creación de los barrios "Casco Histórico de Vicálvaro", "Valdebernardo", "Valderrivas" y "El Cañaveral" y la delimitación territorial interna actualizada del Distrito de Vicálvaro, así como el cambio de denominación del "Barrio de San Andrés" por el de "Villaverde Alto, Casco Histórico de Villaverde" y la delimitación territorial interna actualizada del distrito de Villaverde, junto con la correspondiente modificación del Reglamento Orgánico de los Distritos de la Ciudad de Madrid" (PDF). Boletín Oficial de la Comunidad de Madrid (274): 117–122. 2017-11-17. ISSN 1989-4791.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Vicálvaro District at Wikimedia Commons