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Verbum Dei High School

Verbum Dei High School, "the Verb", is an all-male Catholic, Jesuit, college and career preparatory school that includes a corporate internship program, serving young men of Watts and the surrounding communities who are economically and academically under-served. It is operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles with the sponsorship of the California Province of the Society of Jesus.[2]

Verbum Dei High School
VerbDeiHS.png
Address
11100 South Central Avenue, Watts
Los Angeles, California, United States
Coordinates 33°56′5″N 118°15′12″W / 33.93472°N 118.25333°W / 33.93472; -118.25333Coordinates: 33°56′5″N 118°15′12″W / 33.93472°N 118.25333°W / 33.93472; -118.25333
Information
Type Private, all-male
Motto Working in the Jesuit Tradition;
Ad majorem Dei gloriam
(For the greater glory of God.)
Religious affiliation(s) Roman Catholic;
Society of Jesus (Jesuit)
Established 1962; 56 years ago (1962)
School code AMDG
President Stephen A. Privett
Principal Brandi Odom Lucas
Faculty 51
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 325
Average class size 17.8
12:1 student to teacher ratio
Color(s) Blue and gold         
Slogan The School That Works for the 21st Century!
Sports Football, Cross country, Soccer, Basketball, and Track and Field
Mascot Eagles
Nickname Verb
Team name Eagles
Accreditation Western Association of Schools and Colleges[1]
Newspaper Present Dei
Tuition $2,700
Affiliation Cristo Rey Network
Website

Verbum Dei is known for sending its graduates to some of the more selective colleges in the United States and has held a 100% success rate for sending graduating seniors to college.[3][4] The school is located in the Watts residential district of Los Angeles, California, a few blocks north of Interstate 105 (I-105) and a few miles east of Interstate 110 (I-110).

Contents

HistoryEdit

Verbum Dei was founded in 1962 by the Society of the Divine Word with the permission and recommendation of Cardinal James McIntyre to serve the educational needs of the black community of South Los Angeles. The school was named after one of Jesus' epithets, Verbum Dei ("the Word of God"). Bishop Joseph Francis, S.V.D., led the founding team and was the school's first principal. The Society maintained a presence at the school until December 2006, when the long-time Verbum Dei faculty/staff member Br. Richard "Rich" Morrill, S.V.D.,[5] left because of terminal illness. It remains to be seen if the Society will provide another of its members to Verbum Dei.

At some point, the school expanded its mission in order to also serve the educational needs of the Latino community of South Los Angeles.

Verbum Dei's performance began to decline in the 1980s – probably due to the urban decay of South Los Angeles that began in the 1970s – and suffered further during the neighborhood gang wars of the 1990s; it experienced declining enrollment and instability within the administration. However, it received significant financial help in the mid-1990s and improvements were made in various buildings on campus and new buildings were added.

In 2000, Cardinal Roger Mahony asked the California Province of the Society of Jesus to assist in the administration of the school, asserting that the school had to improve significantly by 2006 to avoid permanent shutdown. Verbum Dei became recognized as a Jesuit school at that point.[6] Leading the Jesuit team was Rev. Bill Wood, S.J. The school became a member of the Cristo Rey Network and adopted its current scholastic model (see Corporate Work Study Program below) in 2002. The school has joint accreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) and the Western Catholic Education Association (WCEA). Verbum Dei also has accreditation by the California Province of the Society of Jesus.[2]

The Religious of the Sacred Heart of Mary have been providing a sister to the Verbum Dei staff for several years.

Corporate Work Study ProgramEdit

Like other members of the Cristo Rey Network, Verbum Dei assigns students to jobs that are "donated" by local white-collar companies and non-profit entities in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. This experience is intended to acclimate students to corporate culture, build their character and provide a motive for seeking higher education and productive careers.

The money earned by the students defrays the cost of the students' education. Participating organizations give one "full-time equivalent" student internship for a fee of $28,000. The position is filled by carefully selected young men from low-income families with an average work attendance of 99 percent. Each student works five full days a month on a rotational basis, and they attend classes and participate in extracurricular activities the remaining days. Ninety-seven percent of the student interns receive a performance evaluation of good or excellent. While almost all students benefit from various internship experiences, 37 percent of seniors have remained at the company they were placed with in their freshman year.[7]

Verbum Dei takes care of the transportation, insurance, workers' compensation, and work permits associated with the student interns. The CWSP staff has a program coordinator to co-manage the students. This program also offers corporate partners the social and strategic benefit of enabling them to make a tangible difference in the lives of young men seeking a better future through quality education and work experience in a corporate environment.[8]

ActivitiesEdit

Verbum Dei High School has a rich history of athletics success, including national championships in basketball.[9]

  • Basketball: CIF champions – 1969 through 1974, 1979, 1994-1995, 1998-1999, 2002-2003; runners-up – 1978, 1990, 1993, 1996, 2004
  • American football: CIF champions – 1981, 1982, 2006[6]
  • Track & field: CIF champions – 1993, 1997, 1998; runners-up – 1979, 1983

Students can choose from 22 extracurricular activities,[10] including working to produce films in partnership with Underground film company with the assistance of J. J. Abrams and Will Smith.[11]

Notable alumniEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ WASC-ACS. "WASC-Accrediting Commission for Schools". Retrieved June 5, 2009.
  2. ^ a b "Who Is Verbum Dei". www.verbumdei.us. Retrieved 2017-08-07.
  3. ^ "Verbum Dei Celebrates National Commitment Day", Los Angeles Sentinel, May 27, 2011
  4. ^ "Every Student at This L.A. High School Got Accepted to College". Time. Retrieved 2018-01-11.
  5. ^ "Flickr". Flickr. Retrieved 2017-08-07.
  6. ^ a b Jennings, Angel. "Next stop for Verbum Dei High's disadvantaged students: college". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2017-08-07.
  7. ^ "A Model for Success". www.verbumdei.us. Retrieved 2017-08-07.
  8. ^ "Quick Facts about the Corporate Work Study Program" Archived February 10, 2012, at the Wayback Machine., Verbum Dei website
  9. ^ "Verbum Dei CIF Championships" Archived July 1, 2014, at the Wayback Machine., Verbum Dei website
  10. ^ "Activities". www.verbumdei.us. Retrieved 2018-01-11.
  11. ^ "Underground's High School Mentorship Takes Aim at Hollywood Diversity". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2018-01-11.
  12. ^ "L.A. Basketball Legend: Raymond Lewis" at raymondlewis.com. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  13. ^ Player biography, UCL Bruins website. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  14. ^ a b Sean Waters, "State Crown Signals Verbum Dei's Return to Glory : In the 1970s, the Eagles Soared With Some of the Greatest Squads Ever to Compete in the Southern Section", Los Angeles Times, March 26, 1995. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  15. ^ Kenny Fields at basketball-reference.com. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  16. ^ Kenneth Miller, "Hardy Nickerson: Former Steeler living the hearty life after football", Los Angeles Sentinel, January 29, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  17. ^ Profile at nba.com
    "Against All Odds, Miller Marked for Success" Continuum, Vol. 9 No. 1 Summer 1999, University of Utah. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  18. ^ Profile at nfl.com. Retrieved October 22, 2013.
  19. ^ Profile at nfl.com. Retrieved October 22, 2013.

Further readingEdit

  • Kearney, G. R. More Than a Dream: The Cristo Rey Story: How One School's Vision Is Changing the World. Chicago, Ill: Loyola Press, 2008. ISBN 978-0-82-942576-5

External linksEdit