Venues of the 2020 Summer Olympics and Paralympics

The 2020 Summer Olympics, officially known as the "Games of the XXXII Olympiad", is an international multi-sport event scheduled to be held in Tokyo, Japan, from 23 July to 8 August 2021. The 2020 Summer Paralympics will follow two weeks later between 25 August and 5 September 2021. Originally scheduled to take place from 24 July to 9 August 2020, the events were postponed in March 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and will be held largely behind closed doors with no spectators permitted under the state of emergency.[a] Despite being rescheduled for 2021, the event retains the Tokyo 2020 name for marketing and branding purposes.[1]

The newly built Japan National Stadium in Tokyo, will host the Ceremonies and Athletics.

Venues and infrastructureEdit

 
Ariake Arena
 
Aquatics Centre
 
Yokohama Stadium – Baseball, softball

In February 2012, it was announced that former Tokyo's National Stadium, the central venue for the 1964 Summer Olympics, would undergo a ¥100 billion renovation for the 2019 Rugby World Cup and the 2020 Summer Olympics.[2] In November 2012, the Japan Sport Council announced it was taking bids for proposed stadium designs. Of the 46 finalists, Zaha Hadid Architects was awarded the project, which would replace the old stadium with a new 80,000-seat stadium. There was criticism of the Zaha Hadid design—which was compared to a bicycle helmet and regarded as clashing with the surrounding Meiji Shrine—and widespread disapproval of the costs, even with attempts to revise and "optimize" the design.[3]

In June 2015, the government announced it was planning to reduce the new stadium's permanent capacity to 65,000 in its athletics configuration (although with the option to add up to 15,000 temporary seats for football) as a further cost-saving measure.[4][5] The original plans to build a retractable roof were also scrapped.[6] As a result of public opposition to the increasing costs of the stadium, which reached ¥252 billion, the government ultimately chose to reject Zaha Hadid's design entirely and selected a new design by Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Inspired by traditional temples and with a lower profile, Kuma's design has a budget of ¥149 billion. Changes in plans prevented the new stadium from being completed in time for the 2019 Rugby World Cup as originally intended.[7] National Stadium was inaugurated on 21 December 2019 and will be named Olympic Stadium during 2020 Olympic Games.[8]

Of the 33 competition venues in Tokyo, 28 are within 8 kilometers (5 miles) of the Olympic Village, with eleven new venues to be constructed.[9] On 16 October 2019, the IOC announced that there were plans to re-locate the marathon and racewalking events to Sapporo for heat concerns.[10] The plans were made official on 1 November 2019 after Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike accepted the IOC's decision, despite her belief that the events should have remained in Tokyo.[11]

Heritage ZoneEdit

Six venues for eight sports are located within the central business area of Tokyo, northwest of the Olympic Village. Three of these venues were originally constructed for the 1964 Summer Olympics.

Venue Events Capacity Status
National Stadium
(known as Olympic Stadium during the games)*
Opening and closing ceremonies 68,000 Completed[12]
Athletics (track and field)
Football (women's final)
Yoyogi National Gymnasium Handball 13,291 Existing
Ryōgoku Kokugikan Boxing 11,098 Existing
Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium Table tennis 10,000 Existing
Nippon Budokan Judo 14,471 Existing
Karate
Tokyo International Forum Weightlifting 5,012 Existing

*Built on the site of the old National Stadium (used for the 1964 Summer Olympics)
Originally constructed for the 1964 Summer Olympics

Tokyo Bay ZoneEdit

There are 13 venues planned for 15 sports located in the vicinity of Tokyo Bay, southeast of the Olympic Village, predominantly on Ariake, Odaiba and the surrounding artificial islands. The flame cauldron will be installed at Tokyo Waterfront City on Ariake West Canal.

Venue Events Capacity Status
Kasai Rinkai Park Canoeing (slalom) 8,000 Ready, built for the games
Oi Hockey Stadium Field hockey 15,000 Ready, built for the games[13]
Tokyo Aquatics Centre Aquatics (swimming, diving, artistic swimming) 15,000 Completed[14]
Tokyo Tatsumi International Swimming Center Water polo[15] 3,635 Existing
Yumenoshima Park Archery 7,000 Completed[16]
Ariake Arena Volleyball 12,000 Ready, built for the games
Ariake Urban Sports Park BMX racing, BMX freestyle 6,000 Completed
Skateboarding
Ariake Gymnastics Centre Gymnastics (artistic, rhythmic, trampoline) 10,000 Completed[17]
Ariake Coliseum Tennis 20,000 = 10,000 center court; 5,000 court 1; 3,000 court 2; 2,000 match courts (8x250) Existing, renovated
Odaiba Marine Park Triathlon 5,000 seated, unlimited standing room along route Existing with temporary stands
Aquatics (marathon swimming)
Shiokaze Park Beach volleyball 12,000 Temporary
Central Breakwater and Sea Forest Waterway Equestrian (eventing) 20,000 Existing with temporary infrastructure
Rowing
Canoeing (sprint)
Aomi Urban Sports Park 3x3 basketball 5,000 Temporary
Sport climbing

Outlying venuesEdit

There are 16 venues for 16 sports situated farther than 8 kilometers (5 miles) from the Olympic Village.

Venue Events Capacity Status
Camp Asaka Shooting 3,200 Existing, renovated
Musashino Forest Sports Plaza Modern pentathlon (fencing) 10,000 Ready, built for the games
Badminton[18]
Musashinonomori Park, Fuchū[19] Road cycling (start road races) Temporary
Tokyo Stadium Football (opening round matches) 49,970[20] Existing
Modern pentathlon (excluding fencing)
Rugby sevens
Saitama Super Arena Basketball 22,000[21] Existing
Enoshima Sailing 10,000[22] Existing with temporary stands
Makuhari Messe Fencing 6,000 Existing with temporary stands
Taekwondo
Wrestling 8,000[23]
Baji Koen Equestrian Park, Setagaya Equestrian (dressage, jumping)[24] 9,300 Existing with temporary stands
Kasumigaseki Country Club Golf 30,000[25][26] Existing with temporary stands
Izu Velodrome, Shizuoka Track cycling 5,000[27] Existing, expanded
Izu Mountain Bike Course, Shizuoka Mountain biking[27] 11,500 Existing
Yokohama Stadium Baseball 30,000[28] Existing
Softball
Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium Baseball (opening match) 30,000 Existing, renovated
Softball (opening match)[29]
Fuji International Speedway Road cycling
(finish road races, time trial)
22,000 Existing
Odori Park Athletics (Marathon and Race walking) 17,300[30] Existing
Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach, Chiba Surfing 6,000[31] Existing

Football venuesEdit

Venue Location Events Matches Capacity Status
International Stadium Yokohama[32] Yokohama Men's and Women's preliminaries and quarter-final, Women's semi-final, Men's final 10 70,000 Existing
Tokyo Stadium Tokyo Men's and Women's opening round 4 49,000 Existing
Saitama Stadium Saitama Men's and Women's preliminaries and quarter-final, Men's semi-final and 3rd place play-off 11 62,000 Existing
Miyagi Stadium Sendai Men's and Women's preliminaries and quarter-final 10 49,000 Existing
Kashima Soccer Stadium Kashima Men's and Women's preliminaries, quarter-final and semi-final, Women's 3rd place play-off 10 40,728 Existing
Sapporo Dome Sapporo Men's and Women's preliminaries 10 42,000 Existing
Japan National Stadium Tokyo Women's final 2 60,012 Completed

Non-competition venuesEdit

 
The Tokyo Big Sight Conference Tower will be used as the IBC/MPC complex.
Venue Events
Hotel Okura Tokyo Olympic Family Hotel
Harumi Futo Olympic Village
Tokyo Big Sight International Broadcast Center (IBC)
Media Press Center (MPC)

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Overseas spectators were first banned in March 2021, then followed by residents of Japan in July of that year to avoid any risk of a superspreading event.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Multiple sources:
    • McDonald, Scott (25 March 2020). "The Reason why Olympics in 2021 will still be called the 2020 Olympic Games". newsweek.com. Archived from the original on 1 April 2020. Retrieved 30 March 2020.
    • Simon Denyer (20 March 2021). "Tokyo Olympics organizers ban spectators from outside Japan in pandemic-control measure". Washington Post. Retrieved 20 March 2021.
    • "Tokyo to be put under state of emergency for duration of 2020 Olympic Games". the Guardian. 8 July 2021. Retrieved 8 July 2021.
  2. ^ Himmer, Alastair (6 February 2012). "Rugby-Tokyo stadium set for billion dollar facelift". Reuters. Archived from the original on 18 September 2017. Retrieved 17 September 2017.
  3. ^ Wainwright, Oliver (6 November 2014). "Zaha Hadid's Tokyo Olympic stadium slammed as a 'monumental mistake' and a 'disgrace to future generations'". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 16 October 2019. Retrieved 16 October 2019.
  4. ^ "新国立、整備費2500億円 従来デザイン維持で決着". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 24 June 2015. Archived from the original on 26 June 2015. Retrieved 27 June 2015.
  5. ^ "国立競技場将来構想有識者会議". 日本スポーツ振興センター. Archived from the original on 26 December 2015. Retrieved 11 July 2015.
  6. ^ "Government drops plan to build retractable roof on Olympic stadium as costs soar". The Japan Times. Kyodo. 29 July 2015. ISSN 0447-5763. Archived from the original on 16 October 2019. Retrieved 16 October 2019.
  7. ^ "Tokyo Olympic stadium gets new, cheaper design". BBC News. 22 December 2015. Archived from the original on 27 December 2015. Retrieved 16 October 2019.
  8. ^ [1]
  9. ^ "Tokyo 2020 candidature file – section 8 – Sports and Venues" (PDF). Tokyo 2020. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 April 2013. Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  10. ^ Takahashi, Ryusei (17 October 2019). "IOC planning to move Tokyo Olympic marathon north to Sapporo in bid to avoid heat". The Japan Times. ISSN 0447-5763. Archived from the original on 16 October 2019. Retrieved 16 October 2019.
  11. ^ Denyer, Simon; Kashiwagi, Akiko (1 November 2019). "Cool runnings: After heated dispute, Tokyo agrees to shift Olympic marathons to more clement climes". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on 1 November 2019. Retrieved 1 November 2019.
  12. ^ "Olympics-Tokyo finishes building stadium for 2020". National Post. Reuters. 19 November 2019. Retrieved 20 November 2019.
  13. ^ "Oi Hockey Stadium". 2020games.metro.tokyo.lg.jp. Bureau of Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 Preparation. 2015. Archived from the original on 28 July 2018. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  14. ^ "Grand opening of Tokyo Aquatics Centre gives boost to athletes". 26 October 2020.
  15. ^ Originally to be held at Water Polo Arena in Koto, Tokyo; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  16. ^ "Yumenoshima Park Archery Field Hits the Bullseye".
  17. ^ "Tokyo 2020 Unveil Completed Ariake Gymnastics Centre".
  18. ^ Badminton originally to be held at Youth Plaza Arena; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  19. ^ Butler, Nick (9 August 2018). "Tokyo 2020 unveil cycling road races courses for Olympic Games". Inside the Games. Archived from the original on 10 August 2018. Retrieved 10 August 2018.
  20. ^ Rugby sevens originally to be held at National Olympic Stadium; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  21. ^ Originally to be held at Youth Plaza Arena; proposal for venue change to Saitama Super Arena in late 2014 was confirmed in March 2015 by the IOC. "IOC supports Tokyo's plans to relocate Olympic venues". The Japan Times. 19 November 2014. Archived from the original on 11 June 2015. Retrieved 10 June 2015. "Moving 2020 hoops to Saitama latest blow for game". The Japan Times. 3 March 2015. Archived from the original on 11 June 2015. Retrieved 10 June 2015.
  22. ^ Originally to be held at Wakasu Olympic Marina; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  23. ^ All three events originally to be held at Tokyo Big Sight; venue moved in June 2015. "東京五輪、26競技の会場決定 自転車・サッカー除き". Nihon Keizai Shimbun. 9 June 2015. Archived from the original on 10 June 2015. Retrieved 9 June 2015.
  24. ^ RGR (28 February 2015). "Change to Tokyo 2020 equestrian venue approved". inside.fei.org. FEI. Archived from the original on 22 August 2016. Retrieved 16 August 2016.
  25. ^ "Olympic Venues". Tokyo2020.org. TOCOG. Archived from the original on 6 July 2017. Retrieved 1 October 2017.
  26. ^ Beall, Joel (20 March 2017). "2020 Olympic golf course changes policy, allows women full membership". Golf Digest. Archived from the original on 2 October 2017. Retrieved 1 October 2017.
  27. ^ a b Wilson, Stephen (10 December 2015). "IOC approves switch of cycling venues for Tokyo Olympics". Japan Today. Archived from the original on 10 December 2015. Retrieved 10 December 2015.
  28. ^ "横浜スタジアム会場案...東京五輪に野球など追加". Yomiuri Online. 4 August 2016. Archived from the original on 6 August 2016. Retrieved 8 August 2016.
  29. ^ "Fukushima Prefecture to Host Tokyo 2020 Baseball & Softball Matches, Showcasing the Power of Sport to Support Recovery". Tokyo2020. TOCOG. 17 March 2017. Archived from the original on 31 March 2017. Retrieved 30 March 2017.
  30. ^ "Tokyo Olympics marathons moved 800km to Sapporo for cooler climate". The Guardian. PA Media. 16 October 2019. Archived from the original on 16 October 2019. Retrieved 16 October 2019.
  31. ^ "Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach". Tokyo2020.org. TOCOG. Archived from the original on 3 March 2021. Retrieved 7 March 2021.
  32. ^ "Olympic sport football". tokyo2020.jp. 21 November 2016. Archived from the original on 21 November 2016. Retrieved 21 November 2016.