Uzbekistan State Institute of Arts and Culture

Uzbekistan State Institute of Arts and Culture (UzSIAC), based on the original Ostrovsky Institute and created by merging the Uzbekistan Institute of Arts and Tashkent State Institute of Culture in 2012, is a state-run higher education institution in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. It is Central Asia’s major training school in the fields of cinema, television, theatre and design.[1]

Uzbekistan State Institute of Arts and Culture
Ўзбекистон Давлат санъат ва маданият институти
Established1945
RectorBakhtier Sayfullaev
Location,
Websitedsmi.uz/en/home

HistoryEdit

The institute was founded in June 1945 as theatre and artistic art institute named after Alexander Ostrovsky, with the aim of creating a training centre for theatre for the Central Asian Republics, which included the former Soviet Union states of Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and Karakalpakstan.[2] The Uzbekistan State institute of Arts and Culture was established on 4 June 2012 by the presidential decree, merging the Uzbekistan Institute of Arts and the Tashkent State Institute of Culture, which was named after Abdullah Kadiri (Kadiri Institute?).[3][4]

DescriptionEdit

There are more than 1600 students enrolled at both bachelor and master level;[2] and 225 teaching staff[4] providing tuition in both visual arts and performing arts (including cinema).[2]

The institute consists of 3 faculties:[3]

  • Dramatic art
  • Art of film, television and radio
  • Folk art

Notable alumniEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Brisbane, Katherine; Chaturvedi, Ravi; Majumdar, Ramendu; et al., eds. (2005). The World Encyclopedia of Contemporary Theatre. Volume 5: Asia/Pacific. Routledge. p. 573. |volume= has extra text (help)
  2. ^ a b c "Uzbekistan State Institute of Arts and Culture". UZDOC: Doctoral studies in Uzbekistan. Archived from the original on 16 October 2017. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Uzbekistan State Institute of Arts and Culture" (PDF). UZDOC: Doctoral studies in Uzbekistan. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 May 2016. Retrieved 26 March 2017.
  4. ^ a b "About the institute". UzSIAC - The Uzbekistan State Institute of Arts and Culture. 2 September 2020. Retrieved 19 December 2020.

External linksEdit