Utah County, Utah

Utah County is the second-most populous county in the U.S. state of Utah. The county seat and largest city is Provo,[1] which is the state's third-largest city, and the largest outside of Salt Lake County. As of the 2020 United States Census, the population was 665,665.[2]

Utah County
Historic Utah County Courthouse
Historic Utah County Courthouse
Flag of Utah County
Map of Utah highlighting Utah County
Location within the U.S. state of Utah
Map of the United States highlighting Utah
Utah's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 40°07′N 111°40′W / 40.12°N 111.67°W / 40.12; -111.67
Country United States
State Utah
FoundedJanuary 31, 1850 (created)
April 18, 1852 (organized)
Named forUte Tribe
SeatProvo
Largest cityProvo
Area
 • Total2,144 sq mi (5,550 km2)
 • Land2,003 sq mi (5,190 km2)
 • Water141 sq mi (370 km2)  6.6%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total659,399
 • Density310/sq mi (120/km2)
Time zoneUTC−7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional districts3rd, 4th
Websitewww.utahcounty.gov

Utah County is one of two counties forming the Provo-Orem metropolitan statistical area, and is part of the larger Salt Lake City-Provo-Orem, UT Combined Statistical Area. In 2010, the center of population of Utah was in Utah County, in the city of Saratoga Springs.[3]

Utah County is one of the fastest-growing counties in the United States, ranking among the top ten counties in numerical growth.[4] Correspondingly, Provo-Orem is among the top eight metropolitan areas by percentage growth in the country.[5]

Utah County is one of seven counties in the United States to have the same name as its state. The other six counties are Arkansas County, Hawaii County, Idaho County, Iowa County, Oklahoma County and New York County (commonly known as Manhattan).[6]

HistoryEdit

The legislature of the State of Deseret created a county on January 31, 1850,[7] to govern the civic affairs of Utah Valley, which by the 1850s was bustling with newly arrived settlers. The county name is derived from the valley name, which is derived from the Spanish name (Yuta) for the Ute Indians. The State of Deseret dissolved soon after (April 5, 1851), but the counties it had set in place continued. There is little record of any official activity conducted by the fledgling county until April 18, 1852, when a full slate of county officials was published, and recordkeeping began. The first courthouse was built in central Provo in 1866–67. It was soon outgrown and was replaced by a second courthouse (1872–73). By the 1920s, this building was also cramped, and the decision was made to erect a combined city-county building, which was completed in 1926.[8]

The county's boundaries were adjusted in 1852, 1854, 1856, 1862, 1880, and 1884. It has retained its present boundary since 1884.[9]

GeographyEdit

 
Mount Timpanogos in the Wasatch Range is visible from much of Utah County.

Utah County terrain ranges from stiff mountain ranges in the east (the Wasatch Range), dropping steeply to a large lake-filled valley. Most of the comparatively level ground is dedicated to agriculture or developed uses, while most of the steep terrain is covered with arid-climate forestation.[10] The county generally slopes to the west and north, with its highest point (Mt. Nebo in the southern part of the county), at 11,928' (3636m) ASL.[11] The county has an area of 2,144 square miles (5,550 km2), of which 2,003 square miles (5,190 km2) is land and 141 square miles (370 km2) (6.6%) is water.[12]

Utah Valley lies at the center of the county, lined by the mountains of the Wasatch Range on the east. Utah Lake occupies a large part of the valley. The elevation ranges from 4,487 feet (1,368 m) above sea level at the lake to 11,928 feet (3,636 m) at the peak of Mount Nebo.

Major highways[10]Edit

Adjacent countiesEdit

 
A partial view of Utah Valley seen here from outside of Salem

Protected areas[10]Edit

Lakes[10]Edit

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
18502,026
18608,248307.1%
187012,20348.0%
188017,97347.3%
189023,76832.2%
190032,45636.6%
191037,94216.9%
192040,7927.5%
193049,02120.2%
194057,38217.1%
195081,91242.7%
1960106,99130.6%
1970137,77628.8%
1980218,10658.3%
1990263,59020.9%
2000368,54039.8%
2010516,56440.2%
2020659,39927.7%
2021 (est.)684,986[13]3.9%
US Decennial Census[14]
1790–1960[15] 1900–1990[16]
1990–2000[17] 2010–2019[2] 2020[18]
Utah County racial composition
Race or Ethnicity 2020[19] 2010[20] 2000[21] 1990[22] 1950[23] 1900[23]
White 81.6% 89.4% 95.7% 96.4% 99.6% 99.9%
 —Non-Hispanic 78.6% 84.2% 87.7% 94.8% n/a n/a
Black or African American 0.7% 0.5% 0.4% 0.1% 0.02% 0.02%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 13.4% 10.8% 8.4% 3.0% n/a n/a
Asian 1.6% 1.4% 1.2% 1.0% n/a n/a
Hawaiian & Pacific Islander 1.0% 0.8% 0.6% 0.5% n/a n/a
Native American 2.0% 1.0% 0.6% 0.7% n/a 0.01%
Multiracial 9.0% 2.7% 1.4%[1] n/a n/a n/a

1 The 2000 census was the first to allow residents to select multiple race categories. Prior to 2000, the census used the category 'Other Race' as a catch-all identifier. For county-level census data in 1950 and 1900, Utah counted all non-White and non-Black residents using this category. 'Other races' formed 1.4% of Utah County's population in 1990, 0.43% in 1950, and 0.07% in 1900.

2020 censusEdit

As of the 2020 United States Census, there were 659,399 people and 171,899 households in the county. The population density was 329.12/sqmi (127.02/km2). There were 192,570 housing units, at an average density of 96.12/sqmi (37.1/km2). The county's racial makeup was 89.4% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 0.6% American Indian or Alaska Native, 1.4% Asian, 0.8% Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, 4.6% some other race, and 2.7% from two or more races. 10.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 140,602 households, out of which 47.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.9% were headed by married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.7% were non-families. 11.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.4% were someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.57, and the average family size was 3.88.

The county's population was spread out, with 35.2% under the age of 18, 15.8% from 18 to 24, 28% from 25 to 44, 14.5% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.

At the 2000 census, the median income for a household in the county was $45,833, and the median income for a family was $50,196. Males had a median income of $37,878 versus $22,656 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,557. About 6.80% of families and 12.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.40% of those under age 18 and 4.80% of those age 65 or over.

Most Reported Ancestries in Utah County (2020)[24]
Ancestry Percentage of Population1
Other European-Americans 30.6%
English 28.1%
American or Unclassified 22.7%
Other British (including Scottish & Welsh) 10.5%
German 10.5%
Mexican 7.7%
Irish 5%
Other Latin American 4.3%
Middle Eastern or North African 0.3%

1 Due to respondents reporting multiple ethnicities, percentages may add up to greater than 100%.

ReligionEdit

Religion in Utah County as of 2020[25]
Religion Percent
Latter-day Saints
72%
None
13%
Protestant
9%
Catholic
5%
Other faiths
1%

2000 censusEdit

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 516,564 people, 140,602 households, and 114,350 families in the county. The population density was 258/sqmi (99.6/km2). There were 148,350 housing units, at an average density of 74.1/sqmi (28.6/km2). The county's racial makeup was 89.4% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 0.6% American Indian or Alaska Native, 1.4% Asian, 0.8% Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, 4.6% some other race, and 2.7% from two or more races. 10.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 140,602 households, out of which 47.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.9% were headed by married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.7% were non-families. 11.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.4% were someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.57, and the average family size was 3.88.

The county's population was spread out, with 35.2% under the age of 18, 15.8% from 18 to 24, 28% from 25 to 44, 14.5% from 45 to 64, and 6.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24.6 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.

At the 2000 census, the median income for a household in the county was $45,833, and the median income for a family was $50,196. Males had a median income of $37,878 versus $22,656 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,557. About 6.80% of families and 12.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.40% of those under age 18 and 4.80% of those age 65 or over.

In 2005, the five most reported ancestries in Utah County were:[26]

GovernmentEdit

 
View of the cities of Lehi, American Fork, Pleasant Grove, Lindon and Orem along Interstate 15 and the northeast shore of Utah Lake

The government is a three-member elected county commission elected at-large. Other elected officials include the county sheriff, the county clerk, county recorder, county assessor, county surveyor, county treasurer, and the county attorney. The current county attorney is David Leavitt, younger brother of former Utah governor Mike Leavitt and son of Dixie Leavitt founder of The Leavitt Group and former Utah state senator.

In 2020, Utah County voters rejected Proposition 9, which would have changed the county's government to a five-member elected county council with an elected county mayor.[27]

The first sheriff of the county was John T. Willis, who was succeeded by William Madison Wall. Alexander Williams served during John Cradlebaugh's court in 1859. He was succeeded by Eli Whipple, who resigned in 1861 and was replaced by Russell Kelly.[28] In 2020, Sheriff Mike Smith publicly stated he would not enforce COVID-19 face mask mandates.[29]

The Utah County Fire Department provides emergency response to all unincorporated areas within Utah County and works with all the incorporated cities within the county plus all Utah state and federal lands. The department is primarily a wildland fires response and urban interspace service with some structure fire and HAZMAT abatement capability.[30]

PoliticsEdit

United States presidential election results for Utah County, Utah[31]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 192,812 66.69% 76,033 26.30% 20,256 7.01%
2016 102,182 50.18% 28,522 14.01% 72,938 35.82%
2012 156,950 88.32% 17,281 9.72% 3,482 1.96%
2008 122,224 77.71% 29,567 18.80% 5,488 3.49%
2004 128,269 85.99% 17,357 11.64% 3,547 2.38%
2000 98,255 81.70% 16,445 13.67% 5,556 4.62%
1996 69,653 71.05% 18,291 18.66% 10,087 10.29%
1992 61,398 56.76% 14,090 13.02% 32,690 30.22%
1988 68,134 77.23% 18,533 21.01% 1,560 1.77%
1984 72,284 82.61% 14,801 16.91% 419 0.48%
1980 71,859 83.44% 12,166 14.13% 2,096 2.43%
1976 49,328 69.48% 18,327 25.82% 3,338 4.70%
1972 42,179 70.94% 10,828 18.21% 6,453 10.85%
1968 29,226 59.01% 16,629 33.57% 3,673 7.42%
1964 20,912 46.63% 23,936 53.37% 0 0.00%
1960 23,057 53.99% 19,626 45.95% 25 0.06%
1956 25,371 66.56% 12,747 33.44% 0 0.00%
1952 20,913 57.71% 15,327 42.29% 0 0.00%
1948 13,395 44.82% 16,191 54.18% 300 1.00%
1944 9,946 38.68% 15,722 61.14% 45 0.18%
1940 8,740 36.48% 15,168 63.32% 48 0.20%
1936 6,173 29.83% 14,387 69.52% 135 0.65%
1932 7,953 38.73% 12,140 59.12% 443 2.16%
1928 8,771 52.19% 7,955 47.33% 81 0.48%
1924 6,946 46.28% 5,226 34.82% 2,838 18.91%
1920 7,752 53.34% 6,377 43.88% 403 2.77%
1916 5,201 37.45% 8,235 59.30% 451 3.25%
1912 4,185 35.45% 4,636 39.26% 2,986 25.29%
1908 6,373 54.82% 4,984 42.87% 269 2.31%
1904 6,490 59.15% 4,243 38.67% 239 2.18%
1900 5,698 50.97% 5,391 48.22% 90 0.81%
1896 2,039 21.66% 7,375 78.34% 0 0.00%

As the center of Mormon culture, Utah County has been referred to as "the most Republican county in the most Republican state in the United States".[32] It has only voted for a Democratic president nine times since statehood, and has not supported a Democrat for president since 1964. Indeed, 1964 is the last time a Democratic presidential candidate has even managed 35 percent of the county's vote, and 1970 was the last time the county elected a Democratic U.S. Senator.

In the 1992 presidential election, George H. W. Bush received the most votes and Bill Clinton was third in votes received. In the 2004 presidential election, 85.99% voted for George W. Bush.[33] In the 2008 U.S. presidential election, the county voted for John McCain by a 58.9% margin over Barack Obama, compared to McCain winning by 28.1% statewide.[34] Eight other Utah counties voted more strongly in favor of McCain.[35] In the 2012 election, Mitt Romney received 88.32% of the vote. In the 2016 election, it gave a slim majority of the vote to Donald Trump, and over 30% of the vote to independent candidate Evan McMullin, who outperformed Hillary Clinton in the county. This was McMullin's largest share of the vote in any county in Utah and his second best nationwide after Madison County, Idaho. In 2020, Joe Biden received over 75,000 votes - the Democrats had never previously received more than 30,000 votes in the county. Indeed, he was the first Democrat to even win a quarter of the county's vote since 1976.

Until 2013, Utah County was represented entirely by one congressional district. Currently, the county is split between two congressional districts. Most of the county's population is in the 3rd District, represented by Republican John Curtis, former Provo Mayor. Much of the county's area however, including Utah Lake, resides in the 4th District currently represented by Republican Burgess Owens.

The county's Republican bent runs right through state and local politics. All five state senators representing the county, as well as all 14 state representatives,[36] are Republicans. There are no elected Democrats above the municipal level.

State Elected Offices
Position District Name Affiliation First Elected
  Senate 7 Mike McKell Republican 2020[37]
  Senate 11 Daniel McCay Republican 2018[38]
  Senate 13 Jake Anderegg Republican 2016[39]
  Senate 14 Mike Kennedy Republican 2020[40]
  Senate 15 Keith Grover Republican 2018[41]
  Senate 16 Curt Bramble Republican 2000[42]
  Senate 24 Derrin Owens Republican 2020[43]
  Senate 27 David Hinkins Republican 2008[44]
  House of Representatives 2 Jefferson Moss Republican 2016[45]
  House of Representatives 6 Cory Maloy Republican 2016[46]
  House of Representatives 27 Brady Brammer Republican 2018[47]
  House of Representatives 48 Keven Stratton Republican 2012[48]
  House of Representatives 56 Kay Christofferson Republican 2012[49]
  House of Representatives 57 Jon Hawkins Republican 2018[50]
  House of Representatives 59 Val Peterson Republican 2010[51]
  House of Representatives 60 Nelson Abbott Republican 2020[52]
  House of Representatives 61 Marsha Judkins Republican 2018[53]
  House of Representatives 63 Adam Robertson Republican 2018[54]
  House of Representatives 64 Norm Thurston Republican 2014[55]
  House of Representatives 65 Stephen Whyte Republican 2021[56]
  House of Representatives 66 Jeff Burton Republican 2020[57]
  House of Representatives 67 Doug Welton Republican 2020[58]
  House of Representatives 68 Merrill Nelson Republican 2012[59]
  Board of Education 9 Cindy Davis Nonpartisan 2018[60]
  Board of Education 11 Natalie Cline Republican 2020[61]
  Board of Education 12 James Moss Jr. Republican 2020[62]
  Board of Education 13 Randy Boothe Republican 2020[63]
  Board of Education 14 Mark Huntsman Nonpartisan 2014[64]

Social issuesEdit

Utah County saw high rates of opioid and other prescription drug addiction from the mid-2000s onwards, foreshadowing the national opioid crisis. The 2008 documentary Happy Valley examined the problem.[65]

Giving USA, which reports on charitable giving in the US, named Utah County as one of the three most generous counties in philanthropic donations, alongside San Juan County, Utah and Madison County, Idaho.[66]

In 2019, one in eight people and one in six children in the county did not have sufficient food.[67]

InfrastructureEdit

Much of Utah's modern transportation infrastructure was built to support automobiles. Prior to the 1950s, Utah County relied on the U.S. Highway System for local transportation. When I-15 was built in 1956 (parallel to Highway 89), it became the dominant transportation vein in the state. The I-15 CORE project added multiple lanes on I-15 through most of Utah County. This expanded 24 miles (39 km) of freeway and was completed in 2012.[68] Other construction projects by UDOT have been done on I-15 since then, including the Technology Corridor project and the Point of the Mountain project.[69] However, the highway system retains its significance in Utah County due to the mountainous terrain.[70] Highway 6 is the closest major road connecting Colorado to the Wasatch Front, running through Spanish Fork Canyon before converging with I-15 in the city of Spanish Fork. Portions of Highway 89 have become prominent local roads known collectively as 'State Street'. Highway 189 is known as 'University Avenue' in the city of Provo, and runs through Provo Canyon into Heber in neighboring Wasatch County.

Utah County has seen significant growth in public transportation over the past 15 years, owing in part to the county's large student population of more than 70,000 commuting to-and-from Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo and Utah Valley University (UVU) in Orem. The two cities jointly operate UTX, a bus rapid transit system, as part of their city bus routes. Provo also serves as the southernmost terminus of the FrontRunner, Utah's intrastate commuter rail service.[71] The Provo FrontRunner station is located on South University Avenue, directly southwest of Amtrak's Provo Station--which is the third stop, after Green River and Helper, for the California Zephyr Amtrak route. In addition to Provo, The FrontRunner currently has three stops in the county. The Orem FrontRunner station is located on the west side of I-15, served by a pedestrian bridge over the freeway that connects the UVU campus directly to the station. An additional stop is under construction in Vineyard, Utah, and is estimated to be open by August 2022.[72] Utah County also operates the American Fork FrontRunner Station and the Lehi FrontRunner Station located near Thanksgiving Point. From Lehi, the FrontRunner leaves Utah County and enters Salt Lake County.

EducationEdit

School districtsEdit

Colleges and universitiesEdit

Four-year institutions

Two-year institutions

CommunitiesEdit

 
Map of Utah County
 
Utah Valley, Utah County as seen from Traverse Ridge in Lehi

CitiesEdit

TownsEdit

Census-designated placesEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

Former communitiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  3. ^ "Centers of Population by State: 2010". US Census Bureau. Retrieved May 5, 2014.
  4. ^ "Top 10 Counties in Numeric Growth: July 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". US Census. Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  5. ^ "Top 10 Metro Areas in Percent Growth: July 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". US Census. Retrieved April 16, 2022.
  6. ^ Joseph Nathan Kane; Charles Curry Aiken (2005). The American Counties: Origins of County Names, Dates of Creation, and Population Data, 1950-2000. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-5036-1.
  7. ^ The Utah County website "History" cites January 28, 1850, as the date of establishing Utah County [1]
  8. ^ "Historic Utah County Courthouse" Utah County website (accessed 26 March 2019)
  9. ^ "Utah: Individual County Chronologies". Newberry Library. 2008. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d Utah County UT Google Maps (accessed 26 March 2019)
  11. ^ "Utah County High Points" Peakbagger (accessed 26 March 2019)
  12. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved June 26, 2015.
  13. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved September 14, 2022.
  14. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  15. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  16. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  17. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 30, 2013.
  18. ^ 2020 Population and Housing State Data | Utah
  19. ^ Bureau, US Census. "Race and Ethnicity in the United States: 2010 Census and 2020 Census". Census.gov.
  20. ^ Bureau, U. S. Census. "U.S. Census 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 27, 1996. Retrieved October 16, 2019.
  21. ^ "Utah County, UT Census Data". infoplease.com.
  22. ^ "1990 Census of Population Social and Economic Characteristics: Utah" (PDF). U.S. Census Bureau.
  23. ^ a b Perlich, Pamela. "Utah Minorities: The Story Told by 150 Years of Census Data" (PDF). Kem C. Gardener Policy Institute.
  24. ^ "American Community Survey: People Reporting Ancestry in Utah County, Utah". US Census Bureau. Retrieved July 3, 2022.
  25. ^ "The 2020 Census of American Religion". Public Religion Research Institute. Retrieved July 3, 2022.
  26. ^ "Utah County, Utah, Ancestry & Family History". ePodunk Inc. Archived from the original on April 13, 2010. Retrieved April 13, 2010.
  27. ^ Cleary, Kaela (November 5, 2020). "Utah County voters say 'no' to Prop 9". The Daily Universe. Retrieved December 7, 2020.
  28. ^ "First Sheriffs of Utah County" Tullidge's Quarterly Magazine, Volume 3, 1885, Page 392, accessed at https://www.familysearch.org/photos/artifacts/46400242 on June 7, 2018 (includes list of sheriffs through around 1876).
  29. ^ Mullahy, Brian (September 18, 2020). "Utah County sheriff says if there's a mask mandate, he won't enforce it". KUTV. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  30. ^ "Utah County Wildland Fire Emergency Response". Archived from the original on August 26, 2015. Retrieved November 13, 2021.
  31. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 31, 2018.
  32. ^ Krakauer, Jon (2003). Under the Banner of Heaven. New York: Doubleday. p. 78. ISBN 9780965778404.
  33. ^ "Utah County General Election, Official Results". UtahCounty.Gov, the Official Website of Utah County Government (http://www.utahcounty.gov). November 2, 2004.
  34. ^ "US Election Atlas". United States Presidential Election Results. David Leip.
  35. ^ "State of Utah County Election Results". NPR. November 21, 2008. Archived from the original on February 18, 2012.
  36. ^ Hesterman, Billy. "Lawmakers say Utah County did well in redistricting process". Daily Herald. Retrieved October 19, 2011.
  37. ^ "Senator McKell Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  38. ^ "Senator McCay Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  39. ^ "Senator Anderegg Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  40. ^ "Senator Kennedy Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  41. ^ "Senator Grover Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  42. ^ "Senator Bramble Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  43. ^ "Senator Owens Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  44. ^ "Senator Hinkins Utah Senate". senate.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  45. ^ "Rep. Moss, Jefferson". Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  46. ^ "Rep. Maloy, A. Cory". Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  47. ^ "Rep. Brammer, Brady". Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  48. ^ "Rep. Stratton, Keven J." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  49. ^ "Rep. Christofferson, Kay J." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  50. ^ "Rep. Hawkins, Jon". Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  51. ^ "Rep. Peterson, Val L." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  52. ^ "Rep. Abbott, Nelson T." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  53. ^ "Rep. Judkins, Marsha". Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  54. ^ "Rep. Robertson, Adam". Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  55. ^ "Rep. Thurston, Norman K." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  56. ^ "Rep. Whyte, Stephen L." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  57. ^ "Rep. Burton, Jefferson S." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  58. ^ "Rep. Welton, Douglas R." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 17, 2021.
  59. ^ "Rep. Nelson, Merrill F." Utah House of Representatives. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  60. ^ "Cindy Davis". www.schools.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  61. ^ "Natalie Cline". www.schools.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  62. ^ "James Moss Jr". www.schools.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  63. ^ "Randy Boothe". www.schools.utah.gov. Retrieved November 16, 2021.
  64. ^ "Mark Huntsman". www.schools.utah.gov. Retrieved November 15, 2021.
  65. ^ "Happy Valley (2008)". Amazon.
  66. ^ Giving USA 2003 (PDF) (Report). AAFRC Trust for Philanthropy (www.afpnet.org).
  67. ^ Smith, Dave (August 18, 2019). "Community Action: With 13% of the county struggling with hunger, how to host a food drive in Utah". Daily Herald. Retrieved January 14, 2020.
  68. ^ "New changes on I-15 in Utah County". Deseret News. Retrieved October 28, 2011.
  69. ^ "UDOT putting final touches on I-15 Tech Corridor, completing 10-year expansion project". Deseret News. Retrieved June 18, 2022.
  70. ^ "Project: I-15 Reconstruction - Salt Lake City". EconWorks. Retrieved June 18, 2022.
  71. ^ "FrontRunner Rail System Map". Utah Transit Authority. Retrieved June 18, 2022.
  72. ^ "UTA making major adjustment to route plans; new stations in Salt Lake, Vineyard almost ready". KSL. Retrieved June 18, 2022.
  73. ^ "Utah School Districts & Charter Schools" (PDF). Utah State Office of Education. July 25, 2012. Retrieved October 19, 2012.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 40°07′N 111°40′W / 40.12°N 111.67°W / 40.12; -111.67