Untitled (1982 painting)

Untitled is a painting created by American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat in 1982. The artwork, which depicts a skull, is among the most expensive paintings ever. In May 2017, it sold for $110.5 million at Sotheby's, the highest price ever paid at auction for artwork by an American artist in a public sale. That record was surpassed by Shot Sage Blue Marilyn by Andy Warhol, which sold for $195 million in May 2022.[1]

Untitled
Untitled1982Basquiat.jpg
ArtistJean-Michel Basquiat
Year1982
MediumAcrylic, spray paint and oilstick on canvas
MovementNeo-expressionism
Dimensions183.2 cm × 173 cm (72 1/8 in × 68 1/8 in)
OwnerYusaku Maezawa

HistoryEdit

Untitled was executed by Jean-Michel Basquiat in 1982, which is considered his most valuable year.[2] A majority of the highest-selling Basquiat paintings at auction date to 1982. Untitled depicts a skull, composed of black brushstrokes with red, yellow and white rivulets against a blue background. It originally sold for $4,000 in 1982.[2] It was owned by the Annina Nosei Gallery in New York, before being sold to Phoebe Chason, who sold it to Alexander F. Milliken in 1982. It hadn't been shown in public since it was sold at Christie's to Emily and Jerry Spiegel for $19,000 in 1984.[3][4]

In May 2017, the painting was auctioned at Sotheby's to Japanese businessman and art collector Yusaku Maezawa for $110.5 million, which far exceeded the pre-sale estimate of $60 million.[5][6] Basquiat, who was 21-years-old when he painted Untitled, is the youngest artist to eclipse the $100 million mark.[7] It is also the first work made after 1980 to sell for more than $100 million.[8] It surpassed Andy Warhol's $105 million auction record for Silver Car Crash (Double Disaster) (1963), and became the sixth-most expensive work ever auctioned.[8] Basquiat's previous record was $57.3 million for Untitled (1982), a painting of a devil, also purchased by Maezawa.[9]

ExhibitionsEdit

Untitled was exhibited for the group show Fast at Alexander F. Milliken Inc. in New York, June–July 1982.[10] After Yusaku Maezawa purchased the painting, he loaned it to the Brooklyn Museum and the Seattle Art Museum in 2018.[11][12][13] Maezawa plans to open a contemporary art museum in his hometown of Chiba, Japan, which will house the painting with the rest of his art collection.[14] It was on display for the Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition at the Brant Foundation in New York, March–May 2019.[15]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pogrebin, Robin (2022-05-10). "Warhol's 'Marilyn,' at $195 Million, Shatters Auction Record for an American Artist". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-05-10.
  2. ^ a b Gotthardt, Alexxa (April 1, 2018). "What Makes 1982 Basquiat's Most Valuable Year". Artsy. Retrieved 2020-09-26.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  3. ^ Pogrebin, Robin; Reyburn, Scott (2017-05-17). "How Basquiat Became the $60 Million Man". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2022-05-10.
  4. ^ Villa, Angelica (2021-03-08). "The Most Expensive Jean-Michel Basquiat Works Ever Sold at Auction". ARTnews.com. Retrieved 2022-05-10.
  5. ^ Pogrebin, Robin; Reyburn, Scott (May 18, 2017). "A Basquiat Sells for 'Mind-Blowing' $110.5 Million at Auction". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-09-26.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  6. ^ Dwyer, Colin (19 May 2017). "At $110.5 Million, Basquiat Painting Becomes Priciest Work Ever Sold By A U.S. Artist". NPR.org. Retrieved 2020-09-26.
  7. ^ Valentine, Victoria (May 25, 2017). "Basquiat's Moment: Record-Shattering $110.5 Million Painting is Most Expensive Ever by an American Artist Sold at Auction". Retrieved 2021-05-17.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  8. ^ a b Mullen, Jethro (May 18, 2017). "Basquiat tops Warhol after painting sells for $111 million". CNNMoney. Retrieved 2020-09-26.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  9. ^ Martinez, Alanna (May 11, 2016). "$57M Basquiat Breaks Auction Record at Christie's". Observer. Retrieved 2020-09-26.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  10. ^ "Alexander F. Milliken Inc, Jean-Michel Basquiat, David Wojnarowicz..., Fast, Group Exhibition Catalogue, June - July 1982". Gallery 98. 2018-05-21. Retrieved 2020-09-26.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  11. ^ Kinsella, Eileen (January 11, 2018). "Yusaku Maezawa's Blockbuster $110.5 Million Basquiat Is Getting Its Own Brooklyn Museum Show". artnet News. Retrieved 2020-09-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  12. ^ Davis, Ben (February 8, 2018). "How a One-Painting Basquiat Show Lets You Get Inside the Brilliant Young Artist's Head". artnet News. Retrieved 2020-09-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  13. ^ "Basquiat—Untitled". Seattle Art Museum. Retrieved 2020-09-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ "The art world's new rock star". Christie's. September 14, 2017. Retrieved 2020-09-30.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  15. ^ Crow, Kelly (February 28, 2019). "$110.5 Million Basquiat Lands in New York's East Village". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2020-10-02.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)