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2016 United States presidential election in Ohio

The 2016 United States presidential election in Ohio was held on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 United States presidential election in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia participated. Ohio voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting the Republican Party's nominee, real estate mogul Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.

2016 United States presidential election in Ohio

← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout71.33%[1] Increase 0.79 pp
  Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Nominee Donald Trump Hillary Clinton
Party Republican Democratic
Home state New York New York
Running mate Mike Pence Tim Kaine
Electoral vote 18 0
Popular vote 2,841,005 2,394,164
Percentage 51.69% 43.56%

Ohio Presidential Election Results 2016.svg
County results
Trump:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Clinton:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

Results by county showing number of votes by size and candidates by color
Treemap of the popular vote by county.

Presidential primary elections for three parties were also held in Ohio, concurrently with Florida, Illinois, Missouri and North Carolina on March 15, 2016. In the Democratic primary, 143 delegates were awarded proportionally in a modified primary which was won by former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. In the Republican primary, John Kasich, the state's incumbent governor, won all of the state's 66 delegates.

Ohio was won by Donald Trump by a margin of 8.13 points. Prior to the election, most news organizations considered the Buckeye State as leaning Republican, due to Trump's appeal to blue collar voters in the Rust Belt. Ohio kept its streak of voting for the winner (a bellwether state) since 1964, as it voted for Trump, who won nationally. Having previously voted Democratic in 2012 and 2008, the win margin was the second largest of the states Trump flipped red (after Iowa). It is also the largest victory margin since George H.W. Bush defeated Michael Dukakis in 1988. Trump also became the first Republican to win Ohio without carrying Hamilton County since Rutherford B. Hayes in 1876.

Ohio was an unprecedented 10.2% more Republican than the national average in 2016, the farthest it had voted from the rest of the nation since 1932. The state had also been one of eleven to vote for Bill Clinton twice in 1992 and 1996 which Hillary Clinton lost in 2016.

Primary electionsEdit

Republican primaryEdit

2016 Ohio Republican primary
 
← 2012 March 15, 2016 2020 →
       
Candidate John Kasich Donald Trump Ted Cruz
Home state Ohio New York Texas
Delegate count 66 0 0
Popular vote 993,886 713,404 264,640
Percentage 46.95% 35.87% 13.31%

 
Ohio results by county
  John Kasich
  Donald Trump

ResultsEdit

Ohio Republican primary, March 15, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
John Kasich 933,886 46.95% 66 0 66
Donald Trump 713,404 35.87% 0 0 0
Ted Cruz 264,640 13.31% 0 0 0
Marco Rubio 46,478 2.34% 0 0 0
Ben Carson (withdrawn) 14,351 0.72% 0 0 0
Jeb Bush (withdrawn) 5,398 0.27% 0 0 0
Mike Huckabee (withdrawn) 4,941 0.25% 0 0 0
Chris Christie (withdrawn) 2,430 0.12% 0 0 0
Carly Fiorina (withdrawn) 2,112 0.11% 0 0 0
Rick Santorum (withdrawn) 1,320 0.07% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
Total: 1,988,960 100.00% 66 0 66
Source: The Green Papers

Democratic primaryEdit

2016 Ohio Democratic primary
 
← 2012 March 15, 2016 2020 →
     
Candidate Hillary Clinton Bernie Sanders
Home state New York Vermont
Delegate count 95 63
Popular vote 696,681 535,395
Percentage 56.12% 43.13%

 
Ohio results by county
  Hillary Clinton
  Bernie Sanders

The Democratic Party's presidential primaries in Ohio were held on March 15, 2016, concurrently with primaries in Florida, Illinois, Missouri and North Carolina. The state's 143 pledged delegates to the 2016 Democratic National Convention were rewarded proportionally according to the statewide vote total. Three candidates appeared on the ballot for the primary – former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Senator Bernie Sanders and businessman Rocky De La Fuente.

BackgroundEdit

By the time Ohio held its primaries, voters from 21 states and two territories already cast their vote for the presidential nomination of the Democratic Party. As of the March 12 elections, Hillary Clinton was projected to have earned 775 pledged delegates to Bernie Sanders' 552.[2] Clinton gained significant victories in the Southern United States, often described as her "firewall",[3] including landslide victories in Mississippi and Alabama and Georgia.[4][5] In contrast, Bernie Sanders managed to gain victories in the Midwestern United States,[6] where Ohio resides, including an upset victory in neighboring Michigan on March 8.[7][8] After the fact, Sanders' campaign took advantage of the momentum gained from the Michigan win, by targeting Illinois, Missouri and Ohio in the March 15 elections, hoping to repeat the same result. Sanders stated that "Not only is Michigan the gateway to the rest of the industrial Midwest, the results there show that we are a national campaign."[9]

Before the Michigan primaries, Clinton and Sanders had debated over economic policies relating to the industrial midwest states and the so-called "rust belt". The disagreements centered around trade deals, including the Trans-Pacific Partnership and Clinton's past support of the North American Free Trade Agreement, and its effect on economies such as Michigan and Ohio.[10][11]

ControversyEdit

Ohio is one of at least seventeen states that has laws allowing voters who are 17 years of age, but will be 18 by the time of the general election, to vote in the presidential primaries.[12] However, Ohio Secretary of State Jon A. Husted had announced in December 2015 that 17 year olds would be outright barred from participating in the 2016 primaries. The rationale for the decision was based on an interpretation of the law in which 17 year olds could "nominate" officials for office, but not "elect". In the case of the presidential primaries, by definition, voters would be electing officials – delegates to each party's presidential nominating convention.[13] The decision was met with criticism by the public, after it was brought to mainstream attention by Representative Kathleen Clyde, after she condemned the rule in a statement released on March 5. Clyde described it as a "underhanded, backroom attack" against young voters.[14] Nine teenagers filed a lawsuit with the Ohio Courts of Common Pleas in Franklin County over the decision, stating that the decision contradicted state law and a decision by the Supreme Court of the United States that allowed 17 year olds turning 18 by the general election to vote.[15]

Bernie Sanders' campaign, whose voter base includes the majority of young voters,[16][17] also filed a lawsuit against the decision, accusing Husted of "arbitrarily" and "unconsititutionally" discriminating against young African-American and Latino voters, citing data from the 2010 United States Census that shows younger voters in Ohio were mostly African-American and Latino.[18][19] Husted, in response to Sanders' lawsuit, said in a public statement that he welcomed the lawsuit, further stating that "I am very happy to be sued on this issue because the law is crystal clear",[18] though, he later spoke out negatively against the lawsuit, claiming that it was "a last-minute political act", designed to "draw attention to his campaign."[20] Many Ohio officials, past and present, such as former Ohio Secretary of State Jennifer Brunner, came out in support of Sanders' lawsuit,[21] and had attracted protests by not only Bernie Sanders supporters, but also Donald Trump supporters as well.[22] In a decision handed down on March 11, an Ohio state judge ruled in favour of both lawsuits by the teenage group and the Sanders campaign, effectively lifting the ban on 17 year olds from voting in the Ohio presidential primaries.[23] Husted initially announced that he would appeal the ruling,[24] however, after learning that such an appeal wouldn't be heard by the court until the day before the primaries, he retracted his intent to appeal.[25]

ForumsEdit

March 13, 2016 – Columbus, Ohio

The ninth forum was held at 8:00 pm EDT on March 13, 2016, at the campus of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, and aired on CNN.[26]

March 14, 2016 – Columbus, Ohio and Springfield, Illinois

The tenth forum was held at 6:00 pm EDT on March 14, 2016, at the campus of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio, and at the Old State Capitol State Historic Site (Illinois) in Springfield, Illinois. It aired on MSNBC. The first section of the town hall with Bernie Sanders was moderated by Chuck Todd; the second section of the town hall with Hillary Clinton was moderated by Chris Matthews.

ResultsEdit

Ohio Democratic primary, March 15, 2016
Candidate Popular vote Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Hillary Clinton 696,681 56.12% 81 14 95
Bernie Sanders 535,395 43.13% 62 1 63
Rocky De La Fuente 9,402 0.76%
Uncommitted N/A 2 2
Total 1,241,478 100% 143 17 160
Source: The Green Papers

Green state conventionEdit

The Green Party of Ohio participated in the March 15 primaries in Ohio, though they did not hold their presidential primary during the event.[27] Instead, delegates to the Green National Convention were awarded based on presidential preference through a nominating convention in Columbus on April 3. Members of the Green Party of Ohio were able to vote in the convention.[28][29]

Ohio Green Party presidential convention, April 3, 2016[30]
Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
  Jill Stein 61% 6
William Kreml 19% 2
Sedinam Moyowasifza-Curry 12% 1
Darryl Cherney 5%
Kent Mesplay 3%
Total - 100.00% 9

PollingEdit

Republican National ConventionEdit

From July 17 through the 20th, Cleveland hosted the Republican Convention, which nominated Donald Trump and Mike Pence.

General electionEdit

PredictionsEdit

The following are final 2016 predictions from various organizations for Ohio as of Election Day.

  1. Los Angeles Times: Leans Clinton[31]
  2. CNN: Leans Trump[32]
  3. Sabato's Crystal Ball: Leans Trump[33]
  4. NBC: Tossup[34]
  5. Electoral-vote.com: Leans Trump[35]
  6. RealClearPolitics: Tossup[36]
  7. Fox News: Leans Trump[37]
  8. ABC: Leans Trump[38]

ResultsEdit

Official state results from the Ohio Secretary of State are as follows

2016 United States presidential election in Ohio
Party Candidate Running Mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Republican Donald Trump Mike Pence 2,841,005 51.69% 18
Democratic Hillary Clinton Tim Kaine 2,394,164 43.56% 0
Nonparty Gary Johnson William Weld 174,498 3.17% 0
Green Jill Stein Ajamu Baraka 46,271 0.84% 0
Nonparty Richard Duncan Ricky Johnson 24,235 0.44% 0
Write-ins Write-ins Write-ins 16,314 0.30% 0
Totals 5,496,487 100.00% 18

By countyEdit

County[39] Donald John Trump
Republican
Hilary Rodham Clinton
Democratic
Gary Earl Johnson
Nonparty
Jill Ellen Stein
Green
Richard Duncan
Nonparty
Various candidates
Write-ins
Margin Total votes cast
# % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Adams 8,659 76.23% 2,326 20.48% 226 1.99% 47 0.41% 62 0.55% 39 0.34% 6,333 55.75% 11,359
Allen 30,487 66.43% 13,294 28.97% 1,486 3.24% 323 0.70% 225 0.49% 79 0.17% 17,193 37.46% 45,894
Ashland 17,493 71.14% 5,740 23.34% 906 3.68% 185 0.75% 183 0.74% 83 0.34% 11,753 47.80% 24,590
Ashtabula 23,318 57.06% 15,577 38.12% 1,213 2.97% 427 1.04% 271 0.66% 61 0.15% 7,741 18.94% 40,867
Athens 11,354 38.56% 16,370 55.60% 1,012 3.44% 539 1.83% 130 0.44% 38 0.13% -5,016 -17.04% 29,443
Auglaize 18,658 78.97% 3,980 16.85% 701 2.97% 112 0.47% 132 0.56% 44 0.19% 14,678 62.12% 23,627
Belmont 21,108 67.82% 8,785 28.23% 777 2.50% 195 0.63% 214 0.69% 43 0.14% 12,323 39.60% 31,122
Brown 14,573 74.33% 4,353 22.20% 431 2.20% 103 0.53% 95 0.48% 52 0.27% 10,220 52.12% 19,607
Butler 106,976 61.54% 58,642 33.73% 5,790 3.33% 1,173 0.67% 566 0.33% 692 0.40% 48,334 27.80% 173,839
Carroll 9,254 70.78% 3,154 24.12% 450 3.44% 91 0.70% 86 0.66% 39 0.30% 6,100 46.66% 13,074
Champaign 12,631 69.77% 4,594 25.38% 582 3.21% 147 0.81% 104 0.57% 46 0.25% 8,037 44.39% 18,104
Clark 35,205 57.31% 23,328 37.98% 1,895 3.08% 511 0.83% 326 0.53% 164 0.27% 11,877 19.33% 61,429
Clermont 67,518 68.12% 26,715 26.95% 3,504 3.54% 728 0.73% 321 0.32% 335 0.34% 40,803 41.16% 99,121
Clinton 13,838 74.10% 4,066 21.77% 514 2.75% 127 0.68% 80 0.43% 50 0.27% 9,772 52.33% 18,675
Columbiana 31,676 68.56% 12,432 26.91% 1,401 3.03% 320 0.69% 228 0.49% 144 0.31% 19,244 41.65% 46,201
Coshocton 10,785 69.35% 4,013 25.80% 468 3.01% 118 0.76% 115 0.74% 53 0.34% 6,772 43.54% 15,552
Crawford 13,611 70.75% 4,625 24.04% 714 3.71% 119 0.62% 121 0.63% 47 0.24% 8,986 46.71% 19,237
Cuyahoga 184,211 30.51% 398,271 65.96% 12,993 2.15% 5,242 0.87% 1,878 0.31% 1,227 0.20% -214,060 -35.45% 603,822
Darke 20,012 78.53% 4,470 17.54% 649 2.55% 149 0.58% 123 0.48% 81 0.32% 15,542 60.99% 25,484
Defiance 11,688 64.25% 5,368 29.51% 782 4.30% 153 0.84% 128 0.70% 73 0.40% 6,320 34.74% 18,192
Delaware 57,568 55.43% 40,872 39.35% 4,116 3.96% 668 0.64% 333 0.32% 303 0.29% 16,696 16.08% 103,860
Erie 19,648 52.29% 16,057 42.73% 1,225 3.26% 342 0.91% 229 0.61% 77 0.20% 3,591 9.56% 37,578
Fairfield 44,314 60.78% 24,881 34.12% 2,439 3.35% 558 0.77% 373 0.51% 348 0.48% 19,433 26.65% 72,913
Fayette 7,995 71.63% 2,739 24.54% 295 2.64% 57 0.51% 50 0.45% 26 0.23% 5,256 47.09% 11,162
Franklin 199,331 34.30% 351,198 60.43% 19,725 3.39% 6,106 1.05% 1,866 0.32% 2,914 0.50% -151,867 -26.13% 581,140
Fulton 13,709 64.59% 6,069 28.59% 1,024 4.82% 167 0.79% 139 0.65% 117 0.55% 7,640 36.00% 21,225
Gallia 9,822 75.96% 2,628 20.32% 285 2.20% 98 0.76% 83 0.64% 15 0.12% 7,194 55.63% 12,931
Geauga 30,227 60.53% 17,569 35.18% 1,502 3.01% 333 0.67% 228 0.46% 82 0.16% 12,658 25.35% 49,941
Greene 48,540 59.30% 28,943 35.36% 3,277 4.00% 680 0.83% 302 0.37% 116 0.14% 19,597 23.94% 81,858
Guernsey 11,445 69.12% 4,359 26.33% 549 3.32% 99 0.60% 84 0.51% 21 0.13% 7,086 42.80% 16,557
Hamilton 173,665 42.45% 215,719 52.73% 13,200 3.23% 3,723 0.91% 1,211 0.30% 1,591 0.39% -42,054 -10.28% 409,109
Hancock 24,183 67.13% 9,609 26.67% 1,535 4.26% 319 0.89% 217 0.60% 160 0.44% 14,574 40.46% 36,023
Hardin 8,717 70.90% 2,920 23.75% 465 3.78% 80 0.65% 79 0.64% 33 0.27% 5,797 47.15% 12,294
Harrison 5,098 72.02% 1,688 23.85% 178 2.51% 53 0.75% 50 0.71% 12 0.17% 3,410 48.17% 7,079
Henry 9,301 66.76% 3,756 26.96% 659 4.73% 111 0.80% 99 0.71% 6 0.04% 5,545 39.80% 13,932
Highland 14,020 75.78% 3,773 20.39% 473 2.56% 103 0.56% 92 0.50% 40 0.22% 10,247 55.39% 18,501
Hocking 8,497 66.19% 3,775 29.40% 367 2.86% 90 0.70% 82 0.64% 27 0.21% 4,722 36.78% 12,838
Holmes 8,720 78.89% 1,788 16.18% 374 3.38% 53 0.48% 62 0.56% 57 0.52% 6,932 62.71% 11,054
Huron 16,226 65.34% 7,192 28.96% 923 3.72% 192 0.77% 244 0.98% 57 0.23% 9,034 36.38% 24,834
Jackson 9,949 72.66% 3,226 23.56% 373 2.72% 64 0.47% 75 0.55% 6 0.04% 6,723 49.10% 13,693
Jefferson 21,117 65.58% 9,675 30.05% 841 2.61% 194 0.60% 196 0.61% 178 0.55% 11,442 35.53% 32,201
Knox 19,131 66.69% 8,171 28.48% 936 3.26% 208 0.73% 164 0.57% 77 0.27% 10,960 38.21% 28,687
Lake 64,255 55.28% 46,397 39.91% 3,833 3.30% 946 0.81% 522 0.45% 293 0.25% 17,858 15.36% 116,246
Lawrence 18,689 70.24% 6,974 26.21% 589 2.21% 160 0.60% 142 0.53% 53 0.20% 11,715 44.03% 26,607
Licking 51,241 61.91% 27,376 33.08% 2,708 3.27% 725 0.88% 462 0.56% 249 0.30% 23,865 28.84% 82,761
Logan 15,957 73.97% 4,647 21.54% 657 3.05% 129 0.60% 127 0.59% 54 0.25% 11,310 52.43% 21,571
Lorain 66,818 47.54% 66,949 47.63% 4,548 3.24% 1,255 0.89% 735 0.52% 257 0.18% -131 -0.09% 140,562
Lucas 75,698 38.32% 110,833 56.10% 7,410 3.75% 2,252 1.14% 857 0.43% 506 0.26% -35,135 -17.78% 197,556
Madison 11,631 67.27% 4,779 27.64% 600 3.47% 110 0.64% 85 0.49% 85 0.49% 6,852 39.63% 17,290
Mahoning 53,616 46.59% 57,381 49.87% 2,606 2.26% 874 0.76% 431 0.37% 164 0.14% -3,765 -3.27% 115,072
Marion 16,961 64.44% 7,928 30.12% 986 3.75% 238 0.90% 158 0.60% 51 0.19% 9,033 34.32% 26,322
Medina 54,810 59.98% 32,182 35.22% 2,975 3.26% 709 0.78% 395 0.43% 302 0.33% 22,628 24.76% 91,373
Meigs 7,309 73.20% 2,260 22.63% 280 2.80% 66 0.66% 63 0.63% 7 0.07% 5,049 50.57% 9,985
Mercer 17,506 80.58% 3,384 15.58% 562 2.59% 110 0.51% 120 0.55% 44 0.20% 14,122 65.00% 21,726
Miami 37,079 70.31% 13,120 24.88% 1,837 3.48% 315 0.60% 229 0.43% 154 0.29% 23,959 45.43% 52,734
Monroe 4,868 71.64% 1,662 24.46% 162 2.38% 36 0.53% 64 0.94% 3 0.04% 3,206 47.18% 6,795
Montgomery 123,909 47.97% 122,016 47.24% 8,387 3.25% 2,282 0.88% 905 0.35% 802 0.31% 1,893 0.73% 258,301
Morgan 4,431 68.77% 1,736 26.94% 192 2.98% 45 0.70% 37 0.57% 2 0.03% 2,695 41.83% 6,443
Morrow 11,948 72.20% 3,761 22.73% 569 3.44% 102 0.62% 101 0.61% 67 0.40% 8,187 49.47% 16,548
Muskingum 24,056 65.03% 11,123 30.07% 1,244 3.36% 261 0.71% 240 0.65% 67 0.18% 12,933 34.96% 36,991
Noble 4,549 75.65% 1,221 20.31% 152 2.53% 34 0.57% 53 0.88% 4 0.07% 3,328 55.35% 6,013
Ottawa 12,653 56.95% 8,285 37.29% 957 4.31% 147 0.66% 140 0.63% 36 0.16% 4,368 19.66% 22,218
Paulding 6,500 71.85% 2,093 23.13% 279 3.08% 78 0.86% 78 0.86% 19 0.21% 4,407 48.71% 9,047
Perry 10,228 68.21% 4,138 27.60% 405 2.70% 103 0.69% 105 0.70% 16 0.11% 6,090 40.61% 14,995
Pickaway 17,076 69.01% 6,529 26.39% 756 3.06% 180 0.73% 114 0.46% 90 0.36% 10,547 42.62% 24,745
Pike 7,902 66.52% 3,539 29.79% 283 2.38% 58 0.49% 83 0.70% 14 0.12% 4,363 36.73% 11,879
Portage 39,971 52.50% 32,397 42.55% 2,415 3.17% 840 1.10% 411 0.54% 105 0.14% 7,574 9.95% 76,139
Preble 15,446 75.11% 4,325 21.03% 553 2.69% 126 0.61% 102 0.50% 13 0.06% 11,121 54.08% 20,565
Putnam 14,961 79.72% 2,922 15.57% 638 3.40% 72 0.38% 119 0.63% 55 0.29% 12,039 64.15% 18,767
Richland 36,590 66.27% 16,085 29.13% 1,637 2.96% 387 0.70% 353 0.64% 162 0.29% 20,505 37.14% 55,214
Ross 18,652 61.40% 10,356 34.09% 934 3.07% 209 0.69% 163 0.54% 66 0.22% 8,296 27.31% 30,380
Sandusky 16,316 58.18% 9,929 35.41% 1,263 4.50% 311 1.11% 190 0.68% 35 0.12% 6,387 22.77% 28,044
Scioto 20,550 66.76% 9,132 29.66% 699 2.27% 217 0.70% 165 0.54% 21 0.07% 11,418 37.09% 30,784
Seneca 14,825 61.80% 7,404 30.87% 1,302 5.43% 242 1.01% 187 0.78% 27 0.11% 7,421 30.94% 23,987
Shelby 18,590 78.31% 4,243 17.87% 594 2.50% 125 0.53% 132 0.56% 56 0.24% 14,347 60.43% 23,740
Stark 98,388 56.15% 68,146 38.89% 5,693 3.25% 1,393 0.79% 1,062 0.61% 557 0.32% 30,242 17.26% 175,239
Summit 112,026 43.42% 134,256 52.04% 7,472 2.90% 2,330 0.90% 1,041 0.40% 854 0.33% -22,230 -8.62% 257,979
Trumbull 49,024 51.05% 43,014 44.79% 2,489 2.59% 849 0.88% 535 0.56% 118 0.12% 6,010 6.26% 96,029
Tuscarawas 26,918 65.19% 12,188 29.52% 1,606 3.89% 287 0.70% 261 0.63% 29 0.07% 14,730 35.68% 41,289
Union 18,096 65.97% 7,718 28.14% 1,119 4.08% 207 0.75% 121 0.44% 168 0.61% 10,378 37.84% 27,429
Van Wert 10,469 76.03% 2,697 19.59% 429 3.12% 105 0.76% 69 0.50% 1 0.01% 7,772 56.44% 13,770
Vinton 3,883 70.57% 1,351 24.55% 168 3.05% 43 0.78% 57 1.04% 0 0.00% 2,532 46.02% 5,502
Warren 77,643 66.21% 33,730 28.76% 4,335 3.70% 715 0.61% 341 0.29% 503 0.43% 43,913 37.45% 117,267
Washington 20,514 68.75% 8,026 26.90% 892 2.99% 208 0.70% 184 0.62% 16 0.05% 12,488 41.85% 29,840
Wayne 32,270 64.73% 15,031 30.15% 1,624 3.26% 379 0.76% 312 0.63% 237 0.48% 17,239 34.58% 49,853
Williams 11,939 68.98% 4,358 25.18% 703 4.06% 130 0.75% 131 0.76% 47 0.27% 7,581 43.80% 17,308
Wood 32,498 50.51% 27,318 42.46% 3,264 5.07% 689 1.07% 344 0.53% 228 0.35% 5,180 8.05% 64,341
Wyandot 7,468 70.51% 2,515 23.74% 437 4.13% 85 0.80% 63 0.59% 24 0.23% 4,953 46.76% 10,592
Totals 2,833,537 51.65% 2,391,649 43.60% 174,061 3.17% 46,186 0.84% 24,172 0.44% 16,290 0.30% 441,888 8.05% 5,485,895


Flipped countiesEdit

Trump won 80 of Ohio's 88 counties, the most since Ronald Reagan won 82 in 1984. He won nine counties that had voted for the Democratic candidate, Barack Obama, in 2012:

By congressional districtEdit

Trump won 12 of 16 congressional districts.[40]

District Trump Clinton Representative
1st 51% 45% Steve Chabot
2nd 56% 40% Brad Wenstrup
3rd 28% 67% Joyce Beatty
4th 64% 31% Jim Jordan
5th 59% 34% Bob Latta
6th 69% 27% Bill Johnson
7th 62% 33% Bob Gibbs
8th 65% 30% Warren Davidson
9th 37% 59% Marcy Kaptur
10th 51% 44% Mike Turner
11th 17% 81% Marcia Fudge
12th 53% 42% Pat Tiberi
13th 45% 51% Tim Ryan
14th 53% 42% David Joyce
15th 55% 40% Steve Stivers
16th 56% 39% Jim Renacci

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.sos.state.oh.us/elections/election-results-and-data/2016-official-elections-results/
  2. ^ "Who's Winning the Presidential Delegate Count?". Bloomberg. Bloomberg L.P. March 12, 2016. Archived from the original on March 12, 2016. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  3. ^ Tani, Maxwell (February 28, 2016). "It's now clear that Hillary Clinton's 'firewall' strategy is alive and well". Business Insider. Axel Springer SE. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  4. ^ Dowling, Brian (March 6, 2016). "Hillary Clinton still strong in South, while Bernie Sanders stays alive". Boston Herald. Herald Media, Inc. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  5. ^ Bump, Philip (March 8, 2016). "Hillary Clinton's stunningly large win in Mississippi". The Washington Post. Nash Holdings LLC. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  6. ^ Riddell, Kelly (March 5, 2016). "Bernie Sanders' campaign gets needed boost with Kansas, Nebraska wins". The Washington Times. Operations Holdings (The Washington Times, LLC). Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  7. ^ Nelson, Colleen McCain; Nicholas, Peter; Meckler, Laura (March 9, 2016). "Bernie Sanders Scores Upset in Michigan Democratic Primary". The Wall Street Journal. News Corp. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  8. ^ Roberts, Dan; Jacobs, Ben; Gambino, Lauren (March 10, 2016). "Bernie Sanders beats Hillary Clinton in stunning Michigan primary upset". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  9. ^ Roberts, Dan; Gambino, Lauren (March 10, 2016). "Sanders optimistic for more midwest upsets after shock Michigan win". The Guardian. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  10. ^ Meckler, Laura; Nicholas, Peter (March 3, 2016). "Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton Spar Over Trade in Midwest". The Wall Street Journal. News Corp. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
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