Open main menu

1916 United States presidential election in New Mexico

The 1916 United States presidential election in New Mexico took place on November 7, 1916. All contemporary forty-eight states were part of the United States presidential election. New Mexico voters chose three electors to represent them in the Electoral College, which voted for President and Vice President.

United States presidential election in New Mexico, 1916

← 1912 November 7, 1916 1920 →
  Woodrow Wilson-H&E.jpg Governor Charles Evans Hughes.jpg
Nominee Woodrow Wilson Charles E. Hughes
Party Democratic Republican
Home state New Jersey New York
Running mate Thomas R. Marshall Charles W. Fairbanks
Electoral vote 3 0
Popular vote 33,527 31,152
Percentage 50.2% 46.6%

President before election

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic

Elected President

Woodrow Wilson
Democratic

BackgroundEdit

During the period between New Mexico's annexation by the United States and statehood, the area was divided between largely Republican machine-run highland regions and its firmly Southern Democrat and Baptist "Little Texas" region to the southeast.[1] A split in the "Old Guard" of highland Republicanism meant that in the state's inaugural presidential election in 1912 Woodrow Wilson carried the state through overwhelming "Little Texas" and southern desert support over Progressive Theodore Roosevelt and incumbent William Howard Taft.[2] Nonetheless, New Mexico was still Taft's fourth-strongest state by vote percentage reflecting the strong Hispanic machine loyalties to him in the northern highlands.[3]

In the East, supporters of Theodore Roosevelt's "Bull Moose" Party rapidly returned to the Republicans, in the Mountain States many if not most of these supporters turned to the Democratic Party not only in presidential elections, but also in state and federal legislative ones.[4] Wilson was also helped by a powerful "peace vote" in the Western states[5] due to opposition to participation in World War I.

VoteEdit

New Mexico was won by incumbent President Woodrow Wilson, who secured a tumultuous reelection against Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes, and Socialist Party icon Allan L. Benson.[6] Wilson's reluctance to bid armed forces in World War I improved his image for this election, as a "peace candidate".[4] However, whilst many Progressive business leaders believed the Republican Old Guard stood for fraud and dishonesty, they nonetheless supported Hughes even whilst opposing GOP candidates for other statewide positions.[2] Consequently, despite its strong Democratic base at a local level that was completely absent in most parts of the West during the "System of 1896",[7] New Mexico was Wilson's third-weakest state in the West.

ResultsEdit

Electoral Results
Presidential candidate Party Home state Popular vote Electoral
vote
Running mate
Count Percentage Vice-presidential candidate Home state Electoral vote
Woodrow Wilson Democratic New Jersey 33,527 50.20% 3 Thomas R. Marshall Indiana 3
Charles Evans Hughes Republican New York 31,152 46.64% 0 Charles W. Fairbanks Indiana 0
Allan L. Benson Socialist New York 1,996 2.99% 0 George Ross Kirkpatrick New Jersey 0
Frank Hanly Prohibition Indiana 112 0.17% 0 Ira Landrith Tennessee 0
Total 66,787 100% 3 3
Needed to win 266 266

Results by countyEdit

Thomas Woodrow Wilson[8]
Democratic
Charles Evans Hughes[8]
Republican
Allan Louis Benson[8]
Socialist
James Franklin Hanly[8]
Prohibition
Margin
County % # % # % # % # % #
Roosevelt 73.56% 1,088 15.55% 230 10.14% 150 0.74% 11 58.01% 858
Eddy 72.57% 1,402 22.00% 425 5.12% 99 0.31% 6 50.57% 977
Curry 63.34% 1,175 19.14% 355 17.41% 323 0.11% 2 44.20% 820
Chaves 68.36% 2,275 25.90% 862 5.59% 186 0.15% 5 42.46% 1,413
Quay 64.21% 1,539 24.95% 598 9.76% 234 1.08% 26 39.26% 941
Luna 63.02% 796 33.10% 418 3.56% 45 0.32% 4 29.93% 378
San Juan 59.64% 637 36.05% 385 4.31% 46 0.00% 0 23.60% 252
Otero 54.39% 824 37.03% 561 8.45% 128 0.13% 2 17.36% 263
Union 53.24% 1,996 39.88% 1,495 6.56% 246 0.32% 12 13.36% 501
Grant 53.93% 2,305 43.73% 1,869 2.25% 96 0.09% 4 10.20% 436
Sandoval 54.57% 734 45.43% 611 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 9.14% 123
Guadalupe 51.52% 1,172 46.90% 1,067 1.58% 36 0.00% 0 4.62% 105
Colfax 51.70% 2,006 47.29% 1,835 0.98% 38 0.03% 1 4.41% 171
Sierra 50.51% 493 47.13% 460 2.36% 23 0.00% 0 3.38% 33
Lincoln 48.05% 863 49.50% 889 2.39% 43 0.06% 1 -1.45% -26
Mora 48.42% 1,505 51.16% 1,590 0.42% 13 0.00% 0 -2.73% -85
Bernalillo 46.14% 2,394 52.26% 2,711 1.48% 77 0.12% 6 -6.11% -317
McKinley 44.86% 550 54.57% 669 0.16% 2 0.41% 5 -9.71% -119
Socorro 44.09% 1,558 55.29% 1,954 0.45% 16 0.17% 6 -11.21% -396
Santa Fe 43.16% 1,406 56.17% 1,830 0.46% 15 0.21% 7 -13.01% -424
Rio Arriba 43.40% 1,528 56.57% 1,992 0.03% 1 0.00% 0 -13.18% -464
San Miguel 42.90% 2,231 56.37% 2,932 0.56% 29 0.17% 9 -13.48% -701
Torrance 39.99% 679 55.83% 948 4.00% 68 0.18% 3 -15.84% -269
Taos 39.95% 910 57.95% 1,320 2.02% 46 0.09% 2 -18.00% -410
Doña Ana 39.84% 1,078 59.35% 1,606 0.81% 22 0.00% 0 -19.51% -528
Valencia 19.77% 383 79.50% 1,540 0.72% 14 0.00% 0 -59.73% -1,157

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Chilton, Lance; New Mexico: A Guide to the Colorful State, p. 95 ISBN 0826307329
  2. ^ a b Hodgson, Illa D. and Garthwaite, Eloyse M.; 'New Mexico's Early Elections: Statehood to New Deal'; New Mexico Historical Review, January 1, 1995; vol. 70, issue 1, pp. 29-46
  3. ^ Menendez, Albert J.; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, 1868-2004, p. 42 ISBN 0786422173
  4. ^ a b Sarasohn, David; 'The Election of 1916: Realigning the Rockies', Western Historical Quarterly, Vol. 11, No. 3 (July 1980), pp. 285-305
  5. ^ Menendez; The Geography of Presidential Elections in the United States, p. 47
  6. ^ "1916 Presidential General Election Results - New Mexico". Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections. Retrieved 2018-02-16.
  7. ^ Burnham, Walter Dean; 'The System of 1896: An Analysis'; in The Evolution of American Electoral Systems, pp. 178-179 ISBN 0313213798
  8. ^ a b c d New Mexico Office of the Secretary of State Bureau of Elections; 'Election Results Compilation of Election, November 7, 1916'; The New Mexico Blue Book, 1917 pp. 100-102