Open main menu

2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

  (Redirected from United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2016)

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia was held on Election Day, November 8, 2016, to elect the 11 U.S. Representatives from the state of Virginia, one from each of the state's 11 congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as House of Representatives elections, Senate elections and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on June 14.

United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2016

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

All eleven Virginia seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 3 8
Seats won 4 7
Seat change Increase 1 Decrease 1
Popular vote 1,859,426 1,843,010
Percentage 49.17% 48.74%
Swing Increase 9.55% Decrease 4.82%

Contents

2016 Virginia redistrictingEdit

 
This image shows the 2016-2020 court-ordered VA Congressional districts.

The Virginia Legislature's 2012 redistricting was found unconstitutional and replaced with a court-ordered redistricting on January 16, 2016.[1][2][3][4][5]

OverviewEdit

United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia, 2016[6]
Party Votes Percentage Seats Before Seats After +/–
Democratic 1,859,426 49.17% 3 4 +1
Republican 1,843,010 48.74% 8 7 -1
Independents/Write-In 79,132 2.09% 0 0 -
Totals 3,781,568 100.00% 11 11

District 1Edit

Republican Rob Wittman has represented Virginia's 1st congressional district since 2007. He was re-elected in 2014 with 63% of the vote.

Wittman has announced that he intends to run for governor in 2017, but will still run for re-election in 2016.[7]

Democratic nominationEdit

A convention was scheduled for May 21 to select a nominee, with a filing deadline of May 7.[8] Bowling Green Town Councilman Matt Rowe was the only candidate to file before the deadline, and was thus automatically nominated.[9]

Independent candidate Gail Parker is also running.[10]

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 1st congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rob Wittman (incumbent) 230,213 59.9
Democratic Matt Rowe 140,785 36.6
Independent Glenda Parker 12,866 3.3
n/a Write-ins 737 0.2
Total votes 384,601 100.0
Republican hold

District 2Edit

Republican Scott Rigell was the incumbent of the 2nd district, which has a PVI of R+2. Rigell was first elected in 2010. Rigell declined to seek re-election.[12] The district encompasses Virginia Beach and surrounding areas.

Republican primaryEdit

CandidatesEdit

Declared
Declined

EndorsementsEdit

Randy Forbes
Individuals
  • Scott Rigell, incumbent U.S. Representative,[14] 2nd District
  • Rob Wittman, incumbent U.S. Representative, 1st District
  • Seven former Secretaries of the Navy including former US Senator John Warner[14]
  • Matt Schlapp, Chairman of the American Conservative Union
  • Tidewater Tea Party Alliance
  • John Cosgrove, state senator
  • Glenn Davis, state delegate
  • Barry Knight, state delegate
  • Jason Miyares, state delegate
  • Gordon Helsel, state delegate
  • Brenda Pogge, state delegate
  • Ron Villanueva, state delegate
  • John Atkinson, Virginia Beach City Treasurer
  • John Moss, Virginia Beach City Council
  • Bobby Dyer, Virginia Beach City Council
  • Bob McCabe, Norfolk Sheriff
  • Danny Diggs, York-Poquoson Sheriff
  • Bob Deeds, James City-Williamsburg Sheriff
  • Linda Curtis, Hampton Vice Mayor
  • Phyllis Schaffly, Hampton School Board
  • Gene Hunt, Poquoson Mayor
  • Buddy Green, Poquoson City Council
  • Jeff Wassmer, York County Chairman
  • Tom Sheppard, York County Board of Supervisors
  • Walt Zaremba, York County Board of Supervisors
  • Jim Funk, former York County Board of Supervisors
  • Don Wiggins, former York County Board of Supervisors
  • George Hrishak, former York County Board of Supervisors
  • Doug Pons, Williamsburg City Council
  • Benny Zhang, Williamsburg City Council
  • Sue Sadler, James City County Board of Supervisors
  • Kevin Onizuk, James City County Board of Supervisors
  • Heather Cordasco, former James City County School Board
Scott Taylor
Individuals

ResultsEdit

Republican primary results[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Taylor 21,406 52.6
Republican Randy Forbes (incumbent) 16,552 40.6
Republican Pat Cardwell 2,773 6.8
Total votes 40,731 100.0

Democratic primaryEdit

Scott Rigell's retirement was expected to make the race competitive, with the Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report immediately changing the rating from Safe to Lean Republican.[23] However, due to the perceived strength of Congressman Forbes's entry into the race, Shaun Brown, a community activist in Hampton, VA who had originally planned to primary US Representative Bobby Scott (D) for the 3rd district,[24] ended up being the only candidate to file for the primary, making her automatically the nominee.[25]

CandidatesEdit

Declared
  • Shaun Brown, community activist [25]
Declined

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 2nd congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Taylor 190,475 61.3
Democratic Shaun D. Brown 119,440 38.5
n/a Write-ins 652 0.2
Total votes 310,567 100.0
Republican hold

District 3Edit

Democrat Bobby Scott has represented Virginia's 3rd congressional district since 1993. He was re-elected in 2014 with 94% of the vote but, the district was made slightly more competitive following the court-ordered redistricting when all of its Richmond and Petersburg constituents were moved into the 4th district.

Republican primaryEdit

Marty Williams, former president of the Virginia State Faternal Order of Police and chairman of the Chesapeake Planning Commission, is running.[28]

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 3rd congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bobby Scott (incumbent) 208,337 66.7
Republican Marty Williams 103,289 33.1
n/a Write-ins 714 0.2
Total votes 312,340 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4Edit

Republican Randy Forbes, first elected in 2001, is the incumbent of the 4th district, but attempted to seek re-election in the 2nd district. The 4th district was changed from a Hampton Roads centered district to a Richmond-centered district following the court's redistricting. Notably, it gained heavily Democratic, black-majority Richmond and Petersburg, which was enough to turn the district into a strongly Democratic district on paper. The old 4th had a PVI of R+4, while the new 4th had a PVI of D+10. The district was considered a Safe Gain for the Democrats by many political analysts, including Larry Sabato's Crystal Ball.

Republican primaryEdit

CandidatesEdit

Declared
  • Jackee Gonzalez[25]
  • Mike Wade, Henrico County Sheriff[29]
Declined

ResultsEdit

Republican primary results[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mike Wade 4,987 64.0
Republican Jackee Gonzalez 2,801 36.0
Total votes 7,788 100.0

Democratic primaryEdit

CandidatesEdit

Declined

ResultsEdit

Democratic primary results[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donald McEachin 11,851 75.4
Democratic Ella Ward 3,867 24.6
Total votes 15,818 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 4th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Donald McEachin 200,136 57.7
Republican Mike Wade 145,731 42.1
n/a Write-ins 789 0.2
Total votes 346,656 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 5Edit

Incumbent Republican Robert Hurt, first elected in 2010, is retiring in 2016.[37] The 5th district, which has a PVI of R+5, is the largest district in the state and stretches from Virginia's southern border to the suburbs of Washington, D.C..

Republican conventionEdit

The Republican party selected State Senator Tom Garrett as its nominee at a convention on May 14, with a filing deadline of March 31.[38][39]

CandidatesEdit

Declared
  • Michael Del Rosso, technology executive[40]
  • Thomas Garrett, Jr., state senator[41]
  • Jim McKelvey, real estate developer, candidate in 2010 and state delegate candidate in 2013[42]
  • Joe Whited, congressional intelligence advisor[43]
Withdrawn
  • Andrew Griffin, former congressional staffer[44][45]

Democratic conventionEdit

The Democratic party had scheduled a convention on May 7 to select a nominee.[46] Jane Dittmar, the former chair of the Albermarle County Board of Supervisors, was the only candidate to file by the filing deadline and so has been declared the Democratic nominee.[39]

CandidatesEdit

Declared
Withdrawn
  • Ericke Cage, former congressional aide[46][48]
Declined

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 5th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Tom Garrett 207,758 58.2
Democratic Jane Dittmar 148,339 41.6
n/a Write-ins 659 0.2
Total votes 356,756 100.0
Republican hold

District 6Edit

Republican Bob Goodlatte has represented Virginia's 6th congressional district since 1993. He was re-elected with 75% of the vote in 2014.

Republican primaryEdit

Harry Griego, a pilot and air force veteran who made a 2015 primary challenge of State Delegate Chris Head, challenged Goodlatte for the Republican nomination.[51]

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results[22]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Goodlatte (incumbent) 18,993 77.9
Republican Harry Griego 5,383 22.1
Total votes 24,376 100.0

Democratic primaryEdit

In 2014, Democratic candidate Bruce Elder, a Staunton City Councilman, had to end his campaign after being diagnosed with cancer.[52] Democrats did not field any candidates to challenge Goodlatte for that year's election.[53] No Democratic candidates announced in the early part of 2016, but Chris Hurst, a reporter for WDBJ in Roanoke who was the boyfriend of murdered reporter Alison Parker, had reportedly met with the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee to discuss a potential campaign for this district.[54] By late May, the only declared Democratic candidate was Warren County Democratic Party Chair Tom Howarth. However, citing health issues, Mr. Howarth withdrew. Kai Degner, a member of the Harrisonburg City Council and former mayor of the city, became the nominee by acclamation in early June.

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 6th congressional district, 2016 [11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Goodlatte (incumbent) 225,471 66.6
Democratic Kai Degner 112,170 33.2
n/a Write-ins 768 0.2
Total votes 338,409 100.0
Republican hold

District 7Edit

Republican Dave Brat has represented Virginia's 7th congressional district since 2014. He was elected in 2014 with 61% of the vote.

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 7th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Brat (incumbent) 218,057 57.5
Democratic Eileen Bedell 160,159 42.2
n/a Write-ins 947 0.3
Total votes 379,163 100.0
Republican hold

District 8Edit

Democrat Don Beyer has represented Virginia's 8th congressional district since 2015. He was elected in 2014 with 63% of the vote.

Republican conventionEdit

The Republican party selected a nominee at a convention on May 7.[55]

Two candidates sought the Republican nomination: Charles Hernick, an environmental consultant, and Mike Webb, a retired army officer.[56][57] Hernick defeated Webb to become the nominee.[58][59]

Independent candidate Julio Gracia is also running.[10]

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 8th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Don Beyer (incumbent) 246,653 68.4
Republican Charles Hernick 98,387 27.3
Independent Julio Garcia 14,664 4.0
n/a Write-ins 972 0.3
Total votes 360,676 100.0
Democratic hold

District 9Edit

Republican Morgan Griffith has represented Virginia's 9th congressional district since 2011. He won re-election to a third term in 2014 with 72% of the vote.

Democratic conventionEdit

The Democratic party selected retired army veteran Derek Kitts as the nominee in a May 21 convention. He defeated Bill Bunch, a farmer and retired postal worker.[60] Roanoke Mayor David Bowers considered running but ultimately declined.[61]

Independent candidate Janice Boyd is also running.[10]

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 9th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Morgan Griffith (incumbent) 212,838 68.6
Democratic Derek Kitts 87,877 28.3
Independent Janice Boyd 9,050 2.9
n/a Write-ins 549 0.2
Total votes 310,314 100.0
Republican hold

District 10Edit

Republican Barbara Comstock is the incumbent in the 10th district. In 2015, Comstock succeeded Republican Frank Wolf, who served for 17 terms before choosing to not seek re-election 2014. The 10th district, which has a PVI of D+1, consists of the northernmost portions of the state. Comstock is running for re-election.[62]

Comstock faced LuAnn Bennett, a real estate executive and ex-wife of former Congressman Jim Moran of the neighboring 8th District.[63] Due to the competitiveness of the district and the ability of both candidates to raise large amounts of money, the race was expected to be one of the most heavily contested in the country.[64] Democratic strategist Ellen Qualls said the 10th District is "essentially the swingiest district in the swingiest state."[64] Libertarian candidate JD Thorpe ran as a write-in candidate.

In the first three weeks of her campaign, Bennett raised $281,000, while Comstock raised $2 million overall since January 2015.[64][65]

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 10th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Barbara Jean Comstock (incumbent) 210,791 52.7
Democratic LuAnn Bennett 187,712 46.9
n/a Write-ins 1,580 0.4
Total votes 400,083 100.0
Republican hold

District 11Edit

Democrat Gerry Connolly has represented Virginia's 11th congressional district since 2009. He was re-elected in 2014 with 57% of the vote. He was the only candidate on the ballot for the seat in 2016.[66]

Republican conventionEdit

One person, John Wolfe, filed for the Republican nomination, which was to be decided at a convention on May 14, 2016. However, Wolfe did not campaign or even attend the convention, so the convention delegates rejected his nomination by a 3-to-1 margin.[67][68] The 11th District Republican Committee searched for a new candidate,[67] but ultimately decided no viable candidate was available and opted to focus on the presidential race and on defeating the Fairfax County meals tax referendum.[69]

Libertarian nominationEdit

One person, Daniel Mittereder, filed for the Libertarian nomination and was accepted. However, he suffered a severe strep throat infection shortly afterward which required a tonsillectomy and was forced to withdraw his candidacy.[70]

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Virginia's 11th congressional district, 2016[11]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gerry Connolly (incumbent) 247,818 87.9
n/a Write-ins 34,185 12.1
Total votes 282,003 100.0
Democratic hold

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Court Ordered Redistricting". Redistricting.dls.virginia.gov. 2015-09-03. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  2. ^ "Gloria Personhuballah et al v. James B Alcorn et al" (PDF). Redistricting.dls.virginia.gov. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  3. ^ "Supreme Court weighs legality of Virginia redistricting". TheHill.com. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  4. ^ "Supreme Court Allows Virginia Redistricting to Stand in 2016". Rollcall.com. 2016-02-01. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  5. ^ "Judges impose new Va. congressional map, redrawing 3rd, 4th Districts - Richmond Times-Dispatch: Virginia Politics". Richmond.com. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  6. ^ "Election Statistics, 1920 to Present - US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives". history.house.gov. Retrieved 6 May 2017.
  7. ^ Portnoy, Jenna (December 12, 2015). "GOP congressman Rob Wittman prepares to jump into Va. governor's race". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 15, 2015.
  8. ^ "Call to Convention 2016" (PDF). Virginia's First Congressional District Committee. Retrieved March 31, 2016.
  9. ^ "Democrats Nominate Matt Rowe for Congress in Virginia's First Congressional District" (Press release). Virginia's First Congressional District Democratic Committee. May 7, 2016. Retrieved 2016-05-24.
  10. ^ a b c "Candidate Lists & Referendums - Virginia Department of Elections". www.elections.virginia.gov. Retrieved 6 May 2017.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "2016 November General Congress". Retrieved November 20, 2016.
  12. ^ Weiner, Rachel (14 January 2016). "Rep. Scott Rigell retiring in 2017". Washington Post. Retrieved 14 January 2016.
  13. ^ Bartel, Bill (January 15, 2016). "Virginia Beach attorney launches bid to replace Rigell in Congress". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  14. ^ a b c d Bartel, Bill (February 8, 2016). "Randy Forbes switching districts in 2016 congressional election". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  15. ^ Bartel, Bill (January 16, 2016). "Del. Scott Taylor announces bid for 2nd District congressional seat". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved January 17, 2016.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Pathé, Simone (January 14, 2016). "Virginia's Scott Rigell Not Running for Re-election". Roll Call. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  17. ^ Davis, Glenn (January 19, 2016). "I never thought about looking at #VA02 and have no intention of it". Twitter. Retrieved February 2, 2016.
  18. ^ a b Toscano, James (February 1, 2016). "BREAKING: @BillDeSteph endorses @Scotttaylorva for #VA02. Makes pitch for veterans". Twitter. Retrieved February 2, 2016.
  19. ^ Ress, Dave (January 17, 2016). "Open seat, redistricting, little time: Rigell's departure sets off scramble". Daily Press. Retrieved January 17, 2016.
  20. ^ Gonzales, Nathan L. (January 14, 2016). "Rigell Retirement Shifts Seat Out of Safe for GOP". Roll Call. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  21. ^ Fredericks, John (January 19, 2016). "Delegate Chris Stolle: I am NOT running for Congress!". Twitter. Retrieved February 2, 2016.
  22. ^ a b c "2016 June Republican Primary (Official Results)". Virginia Department of Elections. Retrieved July 13, 2016.
  23. ^ Gonzales, Nathan L. (January 14, 2016). "Rigell Retirement Shifts Seat Out of Safe for GOP". Roll Call. Retrieved March 31, 2016.
  24. ^ "Kool Beans Brown for Congress". Shaun Brown campaign website. Archived from the original on April 18, 2016. Retrieved April 18, 2016.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  25. ^ a b c Bartel, Bill (April 5, 2016). "Hampton Roads congressional elections draw multiple candidates". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved April 6, 2016.
  26. ^ Ress, Dave (April 1, 2016). "Virginia Politics: candidates file for June primary". Daily Press. Retrieved April 3, 2016.
  27. ^ Ress, Dave (March 25, 2016). "Virginia Politics: And the 2nd District Democrats are ...?". Daily Press. Retrieved March 31, 2016.
  28. ^ Bartel, Bill (March 25, 2016). "Chesapeake city planner to run against U.S. Rep. Bobby Scott". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  29. ^ Nolan, Jim (March 2, 2016). "Henrico Sheriff Wade to run for Congress in redrawn 4th District". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved March 3, 2016.
  30. ^ Fredericks, John (February 8, 2016). "John Fredericks' Odds on Virginia's 2nd and 4th Districts". The Bull Elephant. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  31. ^ Wilmore, J.C. (March 14, 2016). "Donald McEachin to announce Congressional run tomorrow". The Richmonder. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  32. ^ Hafner, Katherine (March 10, 2016). "Chesapeake's Ella Ward running for Forbes' congressional seat in 4th district". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved March 14, 2016.
  33. ^ a b Cain, Andrew (February 8, 2016). "Forbes leaving 4th District to run for Congress in 2nd District". Roll Call. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  34. ^ a b Pathé, Simone (December 7, 2015). "Democrats Interested in Virginia's Fuzzy 4th District Bide Their Time". Roll Call. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  35. ^ Nolan, Jim (January 5, 2016). ".@GovernorVA right-hand man @LevarStoney tells Dem bigs he is not interested in running for Congress in redrawn VA-4th". Twitter. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  36. ^ "2016 June Democratic Primary (Official Results)". Virginia Department of Elections. Retrieved July 13, 2016.
  37. ^ Weiner, Rachel (December 22, 2015). "Va. GOP congressman Robert Hurt retiring at the end of 2016, Republicans say". The Washington Post. Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  38. ^ "GOP to use convention to pick 5th District candidate". The Daily Progress. February 6, 2016. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  39. ^ a b Suarez, Chris (February 29, 2016). "Dittmar officially becomes only Democrat in race for the 5th". The News & Advance. Retrieved March 31, 2016.
  40. ^ Suarez, Chris (January 4, 2016). "Third Republican announces for Hurt's seat". The Daily Progress. Retrieved January 5, 2016.
  41. ^ Cain, Andrew (December 23, 2015). "Hurt confirms plan to retire, Garrett declares for seat". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  42. ^ Dix, Katrina (December 28, 2015). "Jim McKelvey announces run for Fifth District seat". The News & Advance. Retrieved December 28, 2015.
  43. ^ Rohr, Alex (January 25, 2016). "National intelligence advisor enters race for 5th House of Representative seat". The News & Advance. Retrieved February 4, 2016.
  44. ^ Seal, Dean (February 4, 2016). "Lynchburg man becomes 5th GOP candidate for Hurt's seat". The Daily Progress. Retrieved February 4, 2016.
  45. ^ Rohr, Alex (March 31, 2016). "Griffin ends bid for 5th District Republican nomination". The News & Advance. Retrieved March 31, 2016.
  46. ^ a b Metcalfe, Trevor (January 25, 2016). "Ericke Cage drops out of 5th District race". Danville Register & Bee. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  47. ^ "Dittmar to run against Hurt in 5th District". The Daily Progress. September 16, 2015. Retrieved September 17, 2015.
  48. ^ "Halifax native to make bid for Congress". The Gazette-Virginian. April 14, 2015. Retrieved April 15, 2015.
  49. ^ Collins, Paul (January 1, 2016). "Armstrong 'not considering' run for Congress". Martinsville Bulletin. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  50. ^ Cain, Andrew (January 19, 2016). "Todd Haymore won't run for Rep. Robert Hurt's seat". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  51. ^ Petska, Alicia (January 5, 2016). "Challengers emerge for Congressmen Bob Goodlatte, Morgan Griffith". The Roanoke Times. Retrieved January 6, 2016.
  52. ^ "Bruce Elder ends congressional campaign: Fighting cancer". Augusta Free Press. February 12, 2014. Retrieved February 2, 2016.
  53. ^ Ponton, Brendan (May 14, 2014). "Democrats Not Challenging Goodlatte in 6th District". WHSV-TV. Retrieved February 2, 2016.
  54. ^ Pergram, Chad (December 17, 2015). "Boyfriend of murdered TV reporter floats House bid". Fox News. Retrieved January 21, 2016.
  55. ^ "2016 Congressional nominee will be selected by convention". Virginia's 8th District Republican Committee. January 18, 2016. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  56. ^ "New GOP Congressional Hopeful: An International Environmental Consultant". ARLNow. February 2, 2016. Retrieved February 4, 2016.
  57. ^ "Arlington Republican Emerges to Challenge Rep. Don Beyer in 2016". ARLNow. December 23, 2015. Retrieved January 5, 2016.
  58. ^ "Full convention results". Virginia's 8th District Republican Committee. May 7, 2016. Retrieved May 12, 2016.
  59. ^ Sullivan, Patricia (May 9, 2016). "Republicans choose candidate to oppose Beyer in Northern Virginia". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 12, 2016.
  60. ^ Petska, Alicia (May 21, 2016). "Derek Kitts chosen as Democratic opponent against Griffith in 9th District". Roanoke Times. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  61. ^ Petska, Alicia (February 22, 2016). "Roanoke's David Bowers says he won't challenge Morgan Griffith". Roanoke Times. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  62. ^ "Virginia's Rep. Barbara Comstock has raised $1 million for reelection". Washington Post. July 12, 2015. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  63. ^ Weiner, Rachel (2015-12-10). "LuAnn Bennett declares congressional bid against Barbara Comstock". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  64. ^ a b c "Outrunning Bellwethers and Coattails in a Swing State". National Journal. 2016-02-01. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  65. ^ Weiner, Rachel (2012-12-14). "Barbara Comstock challenger LuAnn Bennett raises $281,000 in three weeks". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2016-07-08.
  66. ^ "COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA List of Candidates" (PDF). Retrieved 6 May 2017.
  67. ^ a b "11th District GOP still on hunt for opponent to Connolly". May 31, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2016.
  68. ^ Parker, Mike (May 16, 2016). "Connolly Gets Another Term". Red NoVa. Retrieved May 24, 2016.
  69. ^ http://www.washingtontimes.com, The Washington Times. "GOP opts against fielding candidate to run against Connolly". Retrieved 6 May 2017.
  70. ^ https://ballotpedia.org/Virginia%27s_11th_Congressional_District_election,_2016#cite_note-10

External linksEdit