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2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

The 2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2012, to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state, one from each of the state's nine Congressional districts, including the newly created 9th district following the 2010 United States Census. The elections coincided with other federal and state elections, including a quadrennial presidential election, and a U.S. Senate election. Primary elections were held on August 28, 2012.[1]

2012 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

← 2010 November 6, 2012 (2012-11-06) 2014 →

All 9 Arizona seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 5 3
Seats won 4 5
Seat change Decrease1 Increase2
Popular vote 1,131,663 946,994
Percentage 52.07% 43.57%
Swing Decrease0.96% Increase1.65%

Contents

OverviewEdit

The table shows the number and percentage of votes, as well as the number of seats gained and lost, by each political party in the 2012 elections for the United States House of Representatives in Arizona.

United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona, 2012[2]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 1,131,663 52.07% 4 -1
Democratic 946,994 43.57% 5 +2
Libertarian 82,282 3.79% 0 -
Americans Elect 6,740 0.31% 0 -
Green 5,637 0.26% 0 -
Write-ins 1 <0.01% 0 -
Totals 2,173,317 100% 9 +1
Voter turnout %

RedistrictingEdit

Due to population gains reflected in the 2010 United States Census, Arizona's congressional delegation increased from eight members to nine in 2012. In accordance with the Arizona Constitution, the Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission produced new congressional district maps for use in the 2012 and subsequent elections. In October, 2011, the commission released a draft map and by November 5 that year had completed a round of public hearings for input on the draft map.[3] The map became final after being cleared for compliance with the Voting Rights Act by the United States Department of Justice, and established the official district boundaries for the 2012 elections.

On November 1, 2011, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer, with the approval of the Arizona Senate, removed Colleen Mathis, the commission's chair, charging Mathis was guilty of "failure to apply the Arizona Constitution's redistricting provisions in an honest, independent and impartial fashion."[4] On November 17, the Arizona Supreme Court overturned Brewer's decision and reinstated Mathis.[5] On November 21, Brewer asked the Supreme Court to reconsider its decision and to temporarily reverse Mathis' reinstatement.[6] The Supreme Court refused.[7] The map was pre-cleared by the U.S. Department of Justice on April 9, 2012, and was effect for the 2012 elections.

External links

District 1Edit

Based upon the new map, the 1st district is slightly friendlier to Democrats than its predecessor.[8] Incumbent Republican Paul Gosar, first elected in 2010, ran for election in the more conservative 4th district.[9]

Democratic primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick 33,831 63.7
Democratic Wenona Benally Baldenegro 19,247 36.3
Total votes 53,078 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Candidates
  • Patrick Gatti
  • Gaither Martin
  • Jonathan Paton, State Senator and 2010 Republican nominee in AZ-08[12]
  • Douglas Wade

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jonathan Paton 28,644 60.9
Republican Gaither Martin 8,958 19.0
Republican Douglas Wade 6,758 14.4
Republican Patrick Gatti 2,707 5.7
Total votes 47,067 100.0

Libertarian primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Kim Allen (write-in) 97 100.0
Total votes 97 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 1st congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick 122,774 48.8
Republican Jonathan Paton 113,594 45.1
Libertarian Kim Allen 15,227 6.1
Total votes 251,595 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

District 2Edit

After redistricting, most of 2nd district was composed of land previously located in the 8th district and was thus more favorable to Democrats.[8] Democrat Gabrielle Giffords, who had represented the 8th district since 2007, was seriously wounded in a mass shooting in January 2011 and resigned her congressional seat in January 2012.[13] A special election was held in June 2012 under the boundaries of the then current 8th district, with a primary election held in April 2012; in November 2012 another election took place under the new boundaries of the 2nd district, with a primary scheduled for August 2012.[14]

Democratic primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ron Barber (incumbent) 51,206 82.0
Democratic Matt Heinz 11,213 18.0
Democratic Charlie Manolakis (write-in) 4 0.0
Total votes 62,423 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha McSally 52,809 81.7
Republican Mark Koskiniemi 11,828 18.3
Total votes 64,637 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 2nd congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ron Barber (incumbent) 147,338 50.4
Republican Martha McSally 144,884 49.6
Libertarian Anthony Powell (write-in) 57 0.0
Total votes 292,279 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3Edit

In the October 2011 redistricting, most of the 7th district became the 3rd district and was more favorable to Democrats.[8] Incumbent Democrat Raúl M. Grijalva, first elected in 2002, said in February 2011 that he had no plans to run for the U.S. Senate.[17]

Democratic primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raul Grijalva (incumbent) 24,044 65.6
Democratic Amanda Aguirre 9,484 25.9
Democratic Manny Arreguin 3,105 8.5
Total votes 36,633 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Candidates
  • Gabriela Saucedo Mercer, conservative activist[19]
  • Jaime Vasquez, businessman,[20]

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gabriela Saucedo Mercer 12,474 65.3
Republican Jaime Vasquez 6,622 34.7
Total votes 19,096 100.0

Libertarian primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Blanca Guerra 116 100.0
Total votes 116 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 3rd congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raúl M. Grijalva (incumbent) 98,468 58.4
Republican Gabriella Saucedo Mercer 62,663 37.1
Libertarian Bianca Guerra 7,567 4.5
Total votes 168,698 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4Edit

The new 4th congressional district encompasses most of the rural areas in the old 2nd district, as well as significant portions of the old 1st, 5th, and 6th districts, according to the final maps of the Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission. The district is heavily Republican.[8]

In the November 6, 2012, general election, Paul Gosar, who has represented the 1st district since 2011, was the Republican Party nominee. He moved to Prescott in order to run in the district.

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Johnnie Robinson 10,185 50.05
Democratic Mikel Weisser 10,166 49.95
Total votes 20,351 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 40,033 51.3
Republican Ron Gould 24,617 31.6
Republican Rick Murphy 13,315 17.1
Total votes 77,965 100.0

Libertarian primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Joe Pamelia 189 100.0
Total votes 189 100.0

Americans Elect primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Americans Elect primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Americans Elect Richard Grayson (write-in) 11 100.0
Total votes 11 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 4th congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 162,907 66.8
Democratic Johnnie Robinson 69,154 28.4
Libertarian Joe Pamelia 9,306 3.8
Americans Elect Richard Grayson 2,393 1.0
Total votes 243,760 100.0
Republican hold

District 5Edit

With the October 2011 redistricting, most of the 6th district became the 5th district and continued to favor Republicans.[8] Incumbent Republican Jeff Flake, who has represented this district since 2001, sought the Republican nomination for the U.S. Senate.[21]

Democratic primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Spencer Morgan 19,659 100.0
Total votes 19,659 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Salmon 41,078 51.8
Republican Kirk Adams 38,152 48.2
Total votes 79,230 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 5th congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Salmon 183,470 67.2
Democratic Spencer Morgan 89,589 32.8
Total votes 273,059 100.0
Republican hold

District 6Edit

After redistricting, the bulk of David Schweikert's 5th district became the 9th district,[24] while his home in Fountain Hills was drawn into the newly created 4th district.[25] However, as soon as the maps were released, Schweikert announced he would run in the 6th district. That district had previously been the 3rd, represented by fellow Republican freshman Ben Quayle. However, in a statement announcing his re-election plans, Schweikert pointed out that he'd grown up in Scottsdale—most of which had been drawn into the 6th as well—had represented it in both the state house and in Congress, and owned a second home there.[8] A revised map, however, placed Schweikert's home in Fountain Hills into the reconfigured 6th.[26][27]

Democratic primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matt Jette 12,383 51.9
Democratic W. John Williamson 11,471 48.1
Total votes 23,854 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Quayle, whose home in Phoenix had been drawn into the 9th but was just outside the boundaries of the 6th, opted to seek re-election in the 6th as well. During the bitter primary campaign, Schweikert was widely criticised for a mailer that accused Quayle of "going both ways", suggesting that he was bisexual. On the reverse, the mailer listed issues on which it claimed Quayle had taken both liberal and conservative positions. Senator Jon Kyl said that "such campaign tactics insult the voters, degrade politics and expose those who stoop to them as unworthy of high office" and Senator John McCain said the mailer was one of the "worst that I have seen" and that it "crosses the boundary of decent political dialogue and discourse." Quayle's spokeswoman called the mailer "utterly false" and "a sleazy smear tactic." Schweikert's spokesman responded that people "should get their minds out of the gutter" because the mailer was "obviously" referring to "'both ways' -- as in liberal and conservative." The Arizona Republic asked two political scientists to review the mailer, who both said that they had "never seen anybody accuse someone of flip-flopping [on political issues] that way" and said that it was "difficult to believe" that the sexual suggestion was unintentional.[30][31][32][33][34]

Although the 6th contained almost two-thirds of Quayle's constituents, Schweikert defeated Quayle in the Republican primary—the real contest in this heavily Republican district—by 53 percent to Quayle's 47 percent.[35]

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 41,821 51.5
Republican Ben Quayle (incumbent) 39,414 48.5
Total votes 81,235 100.0

Libertarian primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Jack Anderson 287 100.0
Total votes 287 100.0

Green primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Green primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Green Mark Salazar (write-in) 2 100.0
Total votes 2 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 6th congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 179,706 61.3
Democratic Matt Jette 97,666 33.3
Libertarian Jack Anderson 10,167 3.5
Green Mark Salazar 5,637 1.9
None James Ketover (write-in) 1 0.0
Total votes 293,177 100.0
Republican hold

District 7Edit

In accordance with the redrawn boundaries, most of the 4th district became the 7th district and remained the most Democratic district in Arizona.[8] Incumbent Democrat Ed Pastor considered a run for the U.S. Senate but decided against it.[36]

State senator Kyrsten Sinema, who considered a bid for Congress and lived in the former 4th district,[37] opted to run in the 9th district.[38]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Pastor (incumbent) 22,664 79.0
Democratic Rebecca DeWitt 6,013 21.0
Total votes 28,677 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Fistler did not receive enough write-in votes to appear on the general election ballot as a Republican.[39]

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Scott Fistler (write-in) 116 100.0
Total votes 116 100.0

Libertarian primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Joe Cobb 162 100.0
Total votes 162 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 7th congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ed Pastor (incumbent) 104,489 81.7
Libertarian Joe Cobb 23,338 18.3
Total votes 127,827 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8Edit

With the new map, most of the Maricopa County portion of the old 2nd district was renumbered as the 8th district and made more favorable to Republicans.[8] Incumbent Republican Trent Franks, who had considered running for the U.S. Senate, instead ran successfully for re-election.[40]

Democratic primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gene Scharer 24,510 100.0
Total votes 24,510 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Franks (incumbent) 57,257 83.2
Republican Tony Passalacqua 11,572 16.8
Republican Helmuth Hack (write-in) 18 0.0
Total votes 68,847 100.0

Americans Elect primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Americans Elect primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Americans Elect Stephen Dolgos 34 100.0
Total votes 34 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 8th congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Franks (incumbent) 172,809 63.3
Democratic Gene Scharer 95,635 35.1
Americans Elect Stephen Dolgos 4,347 1.6
Total votes 272,791 100.0
Republican hold

District 9Edit

With the new map, most of the old 5th District became the 9th District.[41] It now encompasses portions of southern Phoenix, as well as all of Tempe and parts of Scottsdale, Mesa, Chandler and Paradise Valley. It is not considered safe for either party.[8]

Former Democratic state senator Kyrsten Sinema defeated Republican nominee Vernon Parker[42] and Libertarian nominee Powell Gammill.[43] Sinema won the general election on November 6, 2012.

Democratic primaryEdit

Candidates

Primary resultsEdit

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kyrsten Sinema 15,536 40.8
Democratic David Schapira 11,419 30.0
Democratic Andrei Cherny 11,146 29.2
Total votes 38,101 100.0

Republican primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Vernon B. Parker 11,184 22.5
Republican Wendy Rogers 10,479 21.0
Republican Martin Sepulveda 10,165 20.4
Republican Travis Grantham 9,179 18.4
Republican Jeff Thompson 3,358 6.7
Republican Lisa Borowsky 3,281 6.6
Republican Leah Campos Schandlbauer 2,139 4.3
Total votes 49,785 100.0

Libertarian primaryEdit

Primary resultsEdit

Libertarian primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Powell Gammill (write-in) 90 100.0
Total votes 90 100.0

General electionEdit

ResultsEdit

Arizona’s 9th congressional district, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kyrsten Sinema 121,881 48.7
Republican Vernon Parker 111,630 44.6
Libertarian Powell E. Gammill 16,620 6.7
Total votes 250,131 100.0
Democratic gain from Republican

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2011/2012 Election Important Dates". Office of the Secretary of State. Archived from the original on September 26, 2011. Retrieved August 16, 2011.
  2. ^ https://apps.azsos.gov/election/2012/General/Canvass2012GE.pdf
  3. ^ "Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission notice of public meeting" (PDF). Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission. Retrieved November 6, 2011.
  4. ^ Pitzl, Mary Jo (November 3, 2011). "Brewer, GOP blasted over Arizona redistrict panel ouster". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved November 6, 2011.
  5. ^ Pitzl, Mary Jo (November 18, 2011). "Court orders reinstatement of redistricting official". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved November 28, 2011.
  6. ^ Pitzl, Mary Jo (November 22, 2011). "Arizona redistricting reinstatement delay requested by Brewer". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved November 28, 2011.
  7. ^ Pitzl, Mary Jo (April 20, 2012). "Arizona map-panel ruling unanimous". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved July 25, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i Taylor, Jessica (October 5, 2011). "House Democrats Gain With New Arizona Map". National Journal. Archived from the original on October 6, 2011. Retrieved October 7, 2011.
  9. ^ Nowicki, Dan; Hansen, Ronald J. (January 7, 2012). "Gosar to run for Congress in new district". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  10. ^ "Baldenegro seeks to become first Native American woman elected to Congress". Maricopa Monitor. February 10, 2012. Retrieved February 17, 2012.
  11. ^ Cole, Cyndy (March 30, 2011). "Kirkpatrick to run again". Arizona Daily Sun. Retrieved April 21, 2011.
  12. ^ Smith, Dylan (January 25, 2012). "Paton to seek CD1 seat in Congress". Tucson Sentinel. Retrieved January 25, 2012.
  13. ^ Somashekhar, Sandhya; Kane, Paul (January 22, 2011). "Rep. Gabrielle Giffords retiring from Congress". The Washington Post.
  14. ^ Lederman, Josh (February 12, 2012). "Arizona lawmaker who replaced Giffords in state Senate to run for her House seat". The Hill. Retrieved February 13, 2012.
  15. ^ Celock, John (March 19, 2012). "Ron Barber, Gabrielle Giffords Aide, Announces Run for Full Term". The Huffington Post. Retrieved March 30, 2012.
  16. ^ Hess, Bill (February 15, 2012). "GOP candidates seeking nomination stands at five". San Pedro Valley News-Sun. Retrieved February 21, 2012.
  17. ^ Miller, Sean J. (February 15, 2011). "Grijalva: 'Distinct possibility' Rep. Giffords runs for Senate". The Hill. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved April 21, 2011.
  18. ^ Nintzel, Jim (February 14, 2012). "Tucson Physician Announces Plan To Challenge Grijalva". Tucson Weekly. Retrieved February 17, 2012.
  19. ^ Classen, Carolyn (February 26, 2011). "Another "Gabby" for U.S. Congress: Gabriela Saucedo Mercer to announce for CD 7 on March 2". Tucson Citizen. Archived from the original on November 5, 2011. Retrieved June 25, 2011.
  20. ^ Pallack, Becky (February 14, 2012). "Democrat Arreguin to run against Grijalva in CD3". Arizona Daily Star. Retrieved February 17, 2012.
  21. ^ Camia, Catalina (February 14, 2011). "GOP Rep. Jeff Flake kicks off Senate bid in Arizona". USA Today. Retrieved April 21, 2011.
  22. ^ Nowicki, Dan (April 25, 2012). "Democrat, 26, to seek congressional seat in District 5". The Arizona Republic. Retrieved May 14, 2012.
  23. ^ Trygstad, Kyle (April 28, 2011). "Kyl Endorses Kirk Adams in Arizona Race to Succeed Flake". Roll Call. Retrieved April 30, 2011.
  24. ^ Arizona Redistricting: Commission releases draft map. Daily Kos, 2011-10-04
  25. ^ Livingston, Abby (October 5, 2011). "New Arizona Lines Mean Battle Between GOP Freshmen". Roll Call. Retrieved November 27, 2012.
  26. ^ Livingston, Abby (February 6, 2012). "Arizona: Quayle Opts to Run Against Schweikert". Roll Call. Retrieved February 7, 2012.
  27. ^ Schweikert defeats Quayle
  28. ^ Christie, Bob (March 9, 2012). "1st Democrat announces run for Ariz. 6th District". Associated Press. Wausau Daily Herald. Retrieved March 9, 2012.[permanent dead link]
  29. ^ http://www.politico.com/2012-election/map/#/House/2012/AZ
  30. ^ http://dailycaller.com/2012/08/08/schweikert-quayle-goes-both-ways-on-important-conservative-issues/ Schweikert: Quayle ‘goes both ways … on important conservative issues’
  31. ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/news/2012/08/06/kyl-faults-schweikert-after-mailer.html Kyl faults Schweikert after mailer says Quayle 'goes both ways'
  32. ^ http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2012/08/03/20120803district-6-schweikert-like-fight-in-dc.html District 6 race: David Schweikert says 'I like the fight' in D.C.
  33. ^ http://archive.azcentral.com/members/Blog/azdc/169420 McCain endorses Quayle, scolds Schweikert for mailer
  34. ^ http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/house-races/243973-mccain-blasts-arizona-republican-who-accused-quayle-of-going-both-ways McCain blasts Arizona Republican who accused Quayle of ‘going both ways’
  35. ^ Zapler, Mike; Isenstadt, Alex (August 29, 2012). "Arizona House primary results: Ben Quayle booted from Congress". Politico.
  36. ^ Miller, Sean J. (March 2, 2011). "Arizona Democrat considering Senate run in absence of Rep. Giffords". The Hill. Retrieved April 21, 2011.
  37. ^ Trygstad, Kyle (June 9, 2011). "Arizona State Senator Interested in House Bid". Roll Call. Retrieved June 13, 2011.
  38. ^ Garcia, Michelle (January 4, 2012). "Bi Politician Announces Congressional Bid". The Advocate. Archived from the original on September 3, 2012. Retrieved January 8, 2012.
  39. ^ "Scott Fistler – Write-in (R-AZ-7)". Tea Party Cheer. Archived from the original on 7 June 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2014.
  40. ^ Duda, Jeremy (April 1, 2011). "Franks bows out of Senate race". Arizona Capitol Times. Retrieved April 21, 2011.
  41. ^ Arizona Redistricting: Commission releases draft map. Daily Kos, 2011-10-04
  42. ^ [1]
  43. ^ Libertarian Party Candidates 2012 Archived 2012-08-08 at the Wayback Machine, Libertarian Party

External linksEdit