United Pasok Momogun Organisation

United Pasok Momogun Organisation (Malay: Pertubuhan Pasok Momogun Bersatu; abbrev:Pasok Momogun or UPMO) is an ethnically-based political party in North Borneo (later Sabah, Malaysia).[1][2] It was a splinter party of United National Kadazan Organisation (UNKO); founded by Donald Stephens earlier in 1961. The breakaway UPMO formed by Orang Kaya Kaya (OKK) Datuk G.S. Sundang, in January 1962 to fight for the interest of Kadazan-Dusun-Murut (KDM) races; with the supports and encouragement of the Chinese in Sabah.[1] The split was in reaction and protest to the suggestion of the Prime Minister of Malaya, Tunku Abdul Rahman to create a new federation country named Malaysia, dubbed Projek Malaysia.

United Pasok Momogun Organisation

Pertubuhan Pasok Momogun Bersatu
AbbreviationPasok Momogun / UPMO
LeaderG.S. Sundang
FounderG.S. Sundang
FoundedJanuary 1962
DissolvedMay 1964
Merger ofReunite back with UNKO to form UPKO (May 1964)
Split fromUnited National Kadazan Organisation (UNKO)
Succeeded byUnited Pasokmomogun Kadazan Organisation (UPKO)
HeadquartersSabah

In May 1964, UPMO eventually reunited with its parent party UNKO which had earlier entered into a coalition with the United Sabah National Organisation (USNO) and the Sabah Chinese Association (SCA) to form a new consociationalism Government of Sabah with Stephens became the state's first Chief Minister, upon the successful formation of Malaysia in 1963,.[3] With the reunification of UPMO back into UNKO had renamed itself as United Pasokmomogun Kadazan Organisation (UPKO) in June 1964.[4][2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Sabah State Archives. "GOVERNMENTAL RECORDS (Before Independence)". Chief Minister Department. Retrieved 9 April 2016.
  2. ^ a b "UPKO/PDS". Retrieved 28 November 2019.
  3. ^ Lim, Regina (2008). Federal-state Relations in Sabah, Malaysia: The Berjaya Administration, 1976-85. Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. p. 42.
  4. ^ "UPKO rebranded to United Progressive People of Kinabalu Organisation". Bernama. Malaysiakini. 23 November 2019. Retrieved 26 November 2019.

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