UEFA Euro 2008 Final

The UEFA Euro 2008 Final was a football match that took place on 29 June 2008 at the Ernst-Happel-Stadion in Vienna, Austria, to determine the winner of the UEFA Euro 2008. Spain defeated Germany 1–0 with a 33rd-minute goal from Fernando Torres. This was only the second time in European Championship history that the champions had won every match in the group stage; the other team to do so was France in 1984. Spain were also the first team since Germany in 1996 to win the tournament undefeated. Despite the one-goal margin of victory, it was a fairly dominant performance by Spain.[5]

UEFA Euro 2008 Final
Euro2008matchprogramme.jpg
Match programme cover
EventUEFA Euro 2008
Date29 June 2008 (2008-06-29)
VenueErnst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna
Man of the MatchFernando Torres (Spain)[1]
RefereeRoberto Rosetti (Italy)[2]
Attendance51,428[3]
WeatherSunny
27 °C (81 °F)
44% humidity[4]
2004
2012

The tournament's closing ceremony was held immediately prior to kickoff, and featured 400 performers,[6] including Spanish singer Enrique Iglesias, singing the tournament's official song, "Can You Hear Me".[7]

VenueEdit

Ernst-Happel-Stadion in Vienna, the largest stadium of the eight Euro 2008 venues, hosted UEFA Euro 2008 final match on 29 June 2008.[8][9]

Opened in 1931, the Ernst-Happel-Stadion was built for the second Workers' Olympiad. Serving as the national stadium, the Ernst-Happel-Stadion hosted numerous Champions League finals, including final between Internazionale and Real Madrid (3–1) in 1964, Porto versus FC Bayern (2–1) in 1987, AC Milan versus Benfica (1–0) in 1990, and Ajax versus AC Milan (1–0) in 1995.[8]

It has a capacity of 50,865 seats which was increased to 53,000 by the first and second place additional rows of seats during the preparation for UEFA Euro 2008.[8]

In addition to football, the Ernst-Happel-Stadion hosted 1995 European LC Championships, the final game of American Football World Championship in 2011, the three game of the final stage of the 13th European Championship of American Football and other athletics, cycling and tennis events.[10]

Route to the finalEdit

Germany Round Spain
Opponent Result Group stage Opponent Result
  Poland 2–0 Match 1   Russia 4–1
  Croatia 1–2 Match 2   Sweden 2–1
  Austria 1–0 Match 3   Greece 2–1
Group B runner-up
Pos Team Pld Pts
1   Croatia 3 9
2   Germany 3 6
3   Austria (H) 3 1
4   Poland 3 1
Source: UEFA
(H) Host.
Final standings Group D winner
Pos Team Pld Pts
1   Spain 3 9
2   Russia 3 6
3   Sweden 3 3
4   Greece 3 0
Source: UEFA
Opponent Result Knockout phase Opponent Result
  Portugal 3–2 Quarter-finals   Italy 0–0 (aet) (4–2 pen.)
  Turkey 3–2 Semi-finals   Russia 3–0

MatchEdit

DetailsEdit

Germany  0–1  Spain
Report
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Germany[4]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Spain[4]
GK 1 Jens Lehmann
RB 3 Arne Friedrich
CB 17 Per Mertesacker
CB 21 Christoph Metzelder
LB 16 Philipp Lahm   46'
CM 8 Torsten Frings
CM 15 Thomas Hitzlsperger   58'
RW 7 Bastian Schweinsteiger
AM 13 Michael Ballack (c)   43'
LW 20 Lukas Podolski
CF 11 Miroslav Klose   79'
Substitutions:
DF 2 Marcell Jansen   46'
FW 22 Kevin Kurányi   88'   58'
FW 9 Mario Gómez   79'
Manager:
Joachim Löw
 
GK 1 Iker Casillas (c)   43'
RB 15 Sergio Ramos
CB 4 Carlos Marchena
CB 5 Carles Puyol
LB 11 Joan Capdevila
DM 19 Marcos Senna
RM 6 Andrés Iniesta
CM 8 Xavi
CM 10 Cesc Fàbregas   63'
LM 21 David Silva   66'
CF 9 Fernando Torres   74'   78'
Substitutions:
MF 14 Xabi Alonso   63'
MF 12 Santi Cazorla   66'
FW 17 Dani Güiza   78'
Manager:
Luis Aragonés

Man of the Match:
Fernando Torres (Spain)[1]

Assistant referees:[2]
Alessandro Griselli (Italy)
Paolo Calcagno (Italy)
Fourth official:
Peter Fröjdfeldt (Sweden)

Match rules[11]

StatisticsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Hero Torres completes honours list". UEFA.com. 30 June 2008. Retrieved 8 June 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Rosetti 'delighted' to referee final". UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. 24 June 2008. Retrieved 17 September 2014.
  3. ^ a b c d "Full-time report Germany–Spain" (PDF). Union of European Football Associations. 29 June 2008. Retrieved 9 June 2012.
  4. ^ a b c "Team Line-ups – Final – Germany-Spain" (PDF). Union of European Football Associations. 29 June 2008. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  5. ^ "Germany 0–1 Spain". BBC Sport. 29 June 2008. Retrieved 20 August 2009.
  6. ^ "UEFA Euro 2008: Opening and closing ceremonies, fan entertainment in the stadiums" (PDF). Media Releases. euro2008.uefa.com. 28 February 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2 June 2008. Retrieved 14 June 2008.
  7. ^ "Official UEFA Euro 2008 song: "Can You Hear Me" by Enrique Iglesias" (PDF). Media Releases. euro2008.uefa.com. 20 May 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 3 October 2008. Retrieved 14 June 2008.
  8. ^ a b c Says, Wojciech. "Ernst Happel Stadion - Vienna - The Stadium Guide". Retrieved 9 December 2019.
  9. ^ "UEFA EURO 2008 - History - Germany-Spain". Uefa.com. 29 June 2008. Retrieved 9 December 2019.
  10. ^ "Ernst-Happel-Stadion – Wien Geschichte Wiki". www.geschichtewiki.wien.gv.at. Retrieved 9 December 2019.
  11. ^ "Regulations of the UEFA European Football Championship 2006/08" (PDF). UEFA.com. Union of European Football Associations. Retrieved 29 July 2014.

External linksEdit