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All-American Bowl (high school football)

  (Redirected from U.S. Army All-American Bowl)

The All-American Bowl is a high school football all-star game, held annually at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. Typically played in January, the All-American Bowl is played between all-star teams representing the eastern and western United States.

All-American Bowl
All-American Bowl presented by American Family Insurance
All-American Bowl Logo.png
StadiumAlamodome
LocationSan Antonio, Texas
Operated2000-present
Sponsors

16 All-Americans have been Heisman Trophy finalists, and 453 have played in the National Football League; notable alumni have included Andrew Luck, Jamaal Charles, Patrick Peterson, Adrian Peterson, Odell Beckham Jr., Eric Berry, Tim Tebow, Joe Thomas, Tyron Smith, Robert Quinn, C.J. Mosley and DeMarco Murray.[1]

The All-American Bowl was previously organized by All-American Games; in 2019, the game's broadcaster NBC Sports announced that it had acquired the game and its assets for an undisclosed amount.

Contents

HistoryEdit

It was first played on December 30, 2000 at Highlander Stadium in Dallas.[2] In 2002, the game was moved to San Antonio.[1]

NBC started broadcasting the All-American Bowl in 2004.[1] As a result, the game became a platform for participating college prospects to announce a verbal commitment to their future university.[3]

Since the game's inception, attendance has risen from 6,300 for the inaugural game in 2000[2] to a record 40,568 in 2017. The United States Army served as title sponsor of the game until 2017, when it announced that it would not renew its sponsorship past the 2018 edition. As of 2019, the game is currently played as the All-American Bowl presented by American Family Insurance.[4][5]

On February 25, 2019, it was announced that All-American Games had sold the game to NBC Sports Group for an undisclosed "seven-figure" amount. There are plans to leverage NBC's other platforms, including NBCSN, and SportsEngine (a provider of digital media services oriented towards youth and amateur sports) as part of promotion and coverage of the game.[1][6] This purchase did not include other events owned by All-American Games, such as the FBU National Championships (a youth football event) and the FBU Freshman All-American Bowl — both held annually in Naples, Florida. However, Steve Quinn (a vice president and national recruiting director of All American Games), and partner Eric Richards, have been in talks to acquire the FBU events.[7]

AwardsEdit

During the week of the game, a number of national awards are given out at a formal awards dinner, which include:

Following the conclusion of the game on Saturday afternoon, the following awards are given out:

Selection processEdit

All-American Bowl players are chosen through a national "selection tour" and associated combine.

Game recordsEdit

Record category Record holder Year Record
Highest Attendance 2017 2017 40,568
Longest Touchdown Pass Travis Waller to Derrius Guice 2015 92 yards
Most Passing Yards Graham Mertz 2019 188 yards
Most Passing Touchdowns Graham Mertz 2019 5 TDs
Most Rushing Yards Demetrius Hart 2011 100 yards (8 carries)
Most Rushing Touchdowns Most Recently: Royce Freeman (tied with 3 others) 2014 3 TDs
Most Receiving Yards Derrius Guice 2015 153 yards (2 receptions)
Most Points, Single Player Most Recently: Royce Freeman (tied with 3 others) 2014 18 points
Most Tackles De'Anthony Thomas 2011 8 tackles
Longest Kickoff Return TD Ted Ginn, Jr. 2004 98 yards
Largest Margin of Victory East over West 47-3 2003 44 points

Game resultsEdit

East victories are shaded ██ red. West victories shaded ██ gold.

Date Site Winning team Losing team Series MVP
 December 30, 2000    Highlander Stadium • Dallas, Texas   West  18  East       15  West 1–0 Dominic Robinson
January 5, 2002 Alamo StadiumSan Antonio, Texas West       26 East 6 West 2–0 Vince Young
January 5, 2003 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 47 West 3 West 2–1 Chris Leak
January 3, 2004 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 45 West 28 Tied 2–2 Ted Ginn, Jr.
January 15, 2005 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 35 East 3 West 3–2 DeSean Jackson
January 7, 2006 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 27 West 16 Tied 3–3 Chris Wells
January 6, 2007 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 24 East 7 West 4–3 Chris Galippo
January 5, 2008 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 33 West 23 Tied 4–4 Terrelle Pryor
January 3, 2009 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 30 West 17 East 5–4 Co-MVPs Bryce Brown and Tajh Boyd
January 9, 2010 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 30 East 14 Tied 5–5 Ronald Powell
January 8, 2011 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 13 West 10 East 6–5 Demetrius Hart
January 7, 2012 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 24 East 12 Tied 6–6 Co-MVPs Cyler Miles and Dorial Green-Beckham
January 5, 2013 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 15 West 8 East 7–6 James Quick
January 4, 2014 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 26 East 8 Tied 7–7 Joe Mixon
January 3, 2015 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 39 East 36 West 8–7 Derrius Guice
January 9, 2016 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 37 East 9 West 9–7 Shea Patterson
January 7, 2017 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 27 West 17 West 9-8 Hunter Johnson
January 6, 2018 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 17 East 16 West 10-8 Caden Sterns
January 5, 2019 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 48 West 14 West 10-9 Graham Mertz

Notable participantsEdit

2001Edit

2002Edit

2003Edit

2004Edit

2005Edit

2006Edit

2007Edit

Source:[8]

2008Edit

Source:[9]

2009Edit

Sources:[10][11]

2010Edit

Sources:[12][13]

2011Edit

Source:[14]

2012Edit

Sources:[15][16]

2013Edit

Source:[17]

2014Edit

Source:[18]

2015Edit

Source:[19]

2016Edit

Source:[20]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Hayes, Dade; Hayes, Dade (2019-02-25). "NBC Sports Acquires The All-American Bowl, A High School Football Showcase". Deadline. Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  2. ^ a b "U.S. Army All-American Past Games". Scout.com. Archived from the original on 2007-07-20. Retrieved 2007-10-24.
  3. ^ "San Antonio's All-American Bowl losing its major sponsor". Bizjournals.com. Retrieved 2019-01-05.
  4. ^ Zuvanich, Adam (2017-01-20). "Army ending sponsorship of All-American Bowl". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved 2019-01-05.
  5. ^ Fields, Scott. "Three area players named finalists for ASWA awards". Opelika-Auburn News. Retrieved 2019-01-05.
  6. ^ "NBC Sports Group Acquires High School Football Showcase". Sports Business Journal. Retrieved 2019-02-26.
  7. ^ Fisher, Adam (February 25, 2019). "Youth football: FBU to remain in Naples after parent company sells All-American Bowl". Naples Daily News. Gannett Company. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  8. ^ "2007 U.S. ARMY ALL AMERICAN BOWL ROSTERS". usarmyallamericanbowl.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2007. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  9. ^ "U.S. Army All-American Bowl Rosters". cstv.com. December 14, 2007. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  10. ^ "2009 East Roster". usarmyallamericanbowl.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  11. ^ "2009 West Roster". usarmyallamericanbowl.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  12. ^ "U.S. Army All-American Bowl Game roster: East". maxpreps.com. December 17, 2009. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  13. ^ "U.S. Army All-American Bowl Game roster: West". maxpreps.com. December 17, 2009. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  14. ^ Bois, Jon (January 8, 2011). "U.S. Army All-American Bowl: Game History And Rosters For Saturday's East And West Teams". sbnation.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  15. ^ "2012 U.S. Army All-American Bowl game roster: East". maxpreps.com. December 30, 2011. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  16. ^ "2012 U.S. Army All-American game roster: West". maxpreps.com. December 30, 2011. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  17. ^ Eberts, Wescott (December 30, 2012). "2013 US Army All-American game roster". sbnation.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  18. ^ "U.S. Army All-American Bowl rosters". 247sports.com. December 27, 2013. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  19. ^ "2015 U.S. Army All-American Bowl Roster: By Team". n.rivals.com. December 17, 2014. Retrieved September 1, 2017.
  20. ^ Judin, Robert (January 4, 2016). "2016 U.S. Army All-American Bowl: Rosters, Coaching Staffs". watchstadium.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)

External linksEdit