Typhoon Amy (1962)

Super Typhoon Amy was a super typhoon formed in 1962. First, Amy made landfall in Taiwan as a Category 4 super typhoon, then in China as a typhoon, moved out into the South China Sea, and finally made landfall in South Korea as a tropical storm. Typhoon Amy is classified as a super typhoon. Typhoon Amy lasted from August 28, 1962 to September 7, 1962.

Super Typhoon Amy
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Typhoon Amy TIROS V 31 aug 1962 2322Z.jpg
Image of Typhoon Amy on August 31, 1962
FormedAugust 28, 1962
DissipatedSeptember 7, 1962
Highest winds1-minute sustained: 260 km/h (160 mph)
Lowest pressure940 hPa (mbar); 27.76 inHg
Fatalities24
Areas affectedKorea, Taiwan, China
Part of the 1962 Pacific typhoon season

Meteorological historyEdit

 
Map plotting the track and the intensity of the storm, according to the Saffir–Simpson scale.

The precursor to Typhoon Amy formed on August 27 northwest of Truk as a surge from the westerlies. The system rapidly gained strength in the open waters of the Pacific Ocean, gaining enough winds to be declared a tropical depression on the morning of August 29. The depression rapidly intensified, becoming a tropical storm within six hours. Now named Amy, the cyclone bent northeast around Saipan with winds of 70 mph (110 km/h). After passing Saipan, Amy strengthened into a typhoon during the afternoon of August 30. Continuing to rapidly strengthen over water, Amy reached its peak wind speed of 160 mph (260 km/h) on the evening of September 1, far to the northeast of the Philippines. After peaking with a pressure of 935 millibars, the typhoon weakened back to 155 mph (255 km/h) and soon 150 mph (250 km/h), which it sustained for several days.[1] Crossing to the northeast of Luzon, Amy maintained strength, rapidly approaching the island of Taiwan on September 4. The storm slowly weakened to a 115 mph (185 km/h) typhoon off the coast of Taiwan, making landfall on September 5 near the city of Yilan City. Amy weakened over land slightly before making landfall near Fuzhou later that day. Amy crossed over mainland China for several days, slowly weakening into a minimal tropical storm before crossing back into the waters of the East China Sea near Yancheng. Amy strengthened back to winds of 45 mph (65 km/h) before weakening into a tropical depression off the coast of South Korea. The depression made landfall near Incheon on September 7, weakening over land. After crossing out into open waters, the remains of Amy became extratropical on September 8, affected by the cold air.[2] The extratropical remains of Amy continued northeast along the North Korean and Chinese mainlands, crossing the island of Sakhalin on September 9. The remains of Amy were lost off the eastern coast of Sakhalin on September 10, west of the Kamchatka Peninsula.[3]

ImpactEdit

 
Amy Damage

Amy's flooding killed 24 people, with millions of dollars in damage (1962 USD) to crops, power, communication lines and buildings.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Annual Tropical Cyclone Report – 1962" (PDF). Pearl Harbor, Hawaii: Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 1962. Retrieved November 30, 2008.
  2. ^ "Annual Tropical Cyclone Report – 1962" (PDF). Pearl Harbor, Hawaii: Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 1962. Retrieved November 30, 2008.
  3. ^ "RSMC Best Track Data (Graphics) in 1962". Tokyo, Japan: Japan Meteorological Agency. 1962. Archived from the original on May 23, 2011. Retrieved April 27, 2011.
  4. ^ "Annual Tropical Cyclone Report – 1962" (PDF). Pearl Harbor, Hawaii: Joint Typhoon Warning Center. 1962. Retrieved November 30, 2008.

External linksEdit