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Triprolidine is an over-the-counter antihistamine with anticholinergic properties.[1] It is used to combat the symptoms associated with allergies and is sometimes combined with other cold medications designed to provide general relief for flu-like symptoms.[2] As with many antihistamines, the most common side effect is drowsiness.[1]

Triprolidine
Triprolidine.svg
Clinical data
Trade namesActidil, Myidil, Actifed (in the latter combined with pseudoephedrine and either dextromethorphan or guaifenesin)
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
Pregnancy
category
  • C (US)
Routes of
administration
Oral
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability4% oral
Protein binding90%
MetabolismHepatic (CYP2D6)
Elimination half-life4–6 hours
ExcretionRenal
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.006.934 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC19H22N2
Molar mass278.391 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
Melting point60 °C (140 °F)
Solubility in water500 mg/mL (20 °C)
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It was patented in 1948 and came into medical use in 1953.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Goldsmith, P.; Dowd, P. M. (1993). "The new H1 antihistamines. Treatment of urticaria and other clinical problems". Dermatologic clinics. 11 (1): 87–95. PMID 8094649.
  2. ^ Williams, B. O.; Liao, S. H.; Lai, A. A.; Arnold, J. D.; Perkins, J. G.; Blum, M. R.; Findlay, J. W. (1984). "Bioavailability of pseudoephedrine and triprolidine from combination and single-ingredient products". Clinical pharmacy. 3 (6): 638–643. PMID 6509877.
  3. ^ Fischer, Jnos; Ganellin, C. Robin (2006). Analogue-based Drug Discovery. John Wiley & Sons. p. 546. ISBN 9783527607495.