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Trinidad and Tobago at the 2012 Summer Olympics

Trinidad and Tobago competed at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, United Kingdom from 27 July to 12 August 2012. This was Trinidad and Tobago's most successful Summer Olympics. It was the nation's largest ever delegation sent to the Olympics, with a total of 30 athletes, 21 men and 9 women, in 6 sports. Trinidad and Tobago's participation in these games marked its sixteenth Olympic appearance as an independent nation, although it had previously competed in four other games (including the 1948 debut in the same host city London) as a British colony, and as part of the West Indies Federation. The nation was awarded four Olympic medals based on the efforts by the athletes who competed in the track and field. Javelin thrower Keshorn Walcott became the first Trinidadian athlete to win an Olympic gold medal since the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, where Hasely Crawford won for the sprint event. Marc Burns, a four-time Olympic athlete and a relay sprinter who led his team by winning the silver medal in Beijing, was the nation's flag bearer at the opening ceremony.

Trinidad and Tobago at the
2012 Summer Olympics
Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg
IOC codeTTO
(TRI used at these Games)
NOCTrinidad and Tobago Olympic Committee
Websitewww.ttoc.org
in London
Competitors30 in 6 sports
Flag bearer Marc Burns (opening)
George Bovell (closing)
Medals
Ranked 47th
Gold
1
Silver
1
Bronze
2
Total
4
Summer Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances
 British West Indies (1960)

OverviewEdit

Trinidad and Tobago's participation in these Olympic games marked its sixteenth appearance as an independent nation since 1964, although it had previously competed in four Olympic games under two different colonies; one as a British colony in 1948, when the nation marked its debut in the same host city for these games, and the other as part of the West Indies Federation, together with Jamaica and Barbados.

Although the athletes from Trinidad and Tobago had competed at every Olympic games since its debut, the nation's delegation to the London Olympics has become the most successful performance at any other Olympic games. It was the largest at any previous Games, with 30 athletes, competing only in 6 sports (athletics, boxing, cycling, sailing, shooting, and swimming). Trinidad and Tobago had also created its historical record by winning the most Olympic medals in the overall standings (4 medals, surpassing the nation's performance at the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo by less than a single medal).[1]

At the London Games, javelin thrower Keshorn Walcott set the nation's historic Olympic record by winning its first ever gold medal since 1976, and the first medal in the field events.[2] Walcott, at age 19, also became Trinidad and Tobago's youngest ever Olympic champion,[3] and the first non-European athlete to win the men's javelin throw since United States' Cy Young at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. Furthermore, he was able to break the national record in the javelin throw event, and to surpass Norway's Andreas Thorkildsen, the defending champion and the Olympic record holder, who finished sixth in the final.

Three other medals were awarded in the track events. Sprinter Lalonde Gordon received the bronze medal in the men's 400 metres. He also led the relay team by winning another medal in the men's 4 × 400 metres relay. Richard Thompson, silver medalist in the men's 100 metres at the Beijing games, and Marc Burns, a four-time Olympic athlete, on the other hand, led their team this time to settle for the silver medal in the men's 4 × 100 metres relay.

Apart from the track and field, Trinidad and Tobago also excelled in cycling and swimming. Njisane Phillip qualified for the men's sprint and Keirin events in track cycling, but narrowly missed the bronze medal to Australia's Shane Perkins, finishing only in fourth place. Meanwhile, swimmer and former Olympic bronze medalist George Bovell had competed in the freestyle and backstroke events, particularly in the men's 50 m freestyle. After his dismal performance in Beijing, Bovell performed tremendously in these Olympic games by finishing first in the overall heats, and fifth in the semi-finals, allowing him to take the qualifying spot for the finals. In the end, he finished abruptly in seventh place.

MedalistsEdit

Medal Name Sport Event Date
  Gold Keshorn Walcott Athletics Men's javelin throw 11 August
  Silver* Keston Bledman
Marc Burns
Emmanuel Callender
Richard Thompson
Athletics Men's 4 × 100 m relay 11 August
  Bronze Lalonde Gordon Athletics Men's 400 m 6 August
  Bronze Lalonde Gordon
Jarrin Solomon
Ade Alleyne-Forte
Deon Lendore
Athletics Men's 4 × 400 m relay 10 August

* In May 2014, the US 4 × 100 metres relay team member Tyson Gay received a one-year suspension for anabolic steroid use and was stripped of his medals after 15 July 2012 when he first used.[4] In May 2015, the IOC wrote to US Olympic Committee telling them to collect the medals from teammates Trell Kimmons, Justin Gatlin, Ryan Bailey, Jeffery Demps and Darvis Patton.[5] Two of Gay's teammates who ran with him in the final, Kimmons and Bailey, had previously also served suspensions. The medals were reallocated, with Trinidad and Tobago awarded silver, and France taking bronze.[6][7]

AthleticsEdit

Athletes from Trinidad & Tobago have so far achieved qualifying standards in the following athletics events (up to a maximum of 3 athletes in each event at the 'A' Standard, and 1 at the 'B' Standard):[8][9]

Key
  • Note–Ranks given for track events are within the athlete's heat only
  • Q = Qualified for the next round
  • q = Qualified for the next round as a fastest loser or, in field events, by position without achieving the qualifying target
  • NR = National record
  • N/A = Round not applicable for the event
  • Bye = Athlete not required to compete in round

 
The Trinidad and Tobago 4 × 100 m relay team that won the silver medal
Men
Track & road events
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank
Keston Bledman 100 m Bye 10.13 3 Q 10.04 4 Did not advance
Wayne Davis 110 m hurdles 13.52 4 q N/A 13.49 6 Did not advance
Jehue Gordon 400 m hurdles 49.37 2 Q N/A 47.96 2 Q 48.86 6
Lalonde Gordon 400 m 45.43 2 Q N/A 44.58 1 Q 44.52  
Deon Lendore 45.81 5 N/A Did not advance
Renny Quow DNS N/A Did not advance
Rondel Sorrillo 100 m Bye 10.23 3 Q 10.31 8 Did not advance
200 m 20.76 5 N/A Did not advance
Mikel Thomas 110 m hurdles 13.74 5 N/A Did not advance
Richard Thompson 100 m Bye 10.14 2 Q 10.02 3 q 9.98 7
Keston Bledman
Marc Burns
Emmanuel Callender
Richard Thompson
4 × 100 m relay 38.10 3 Q N/A 38.12  
Ade Alleyne-Forte
Machel Cedenio
Lalonde Gordon
Deon Lendore
Renny Quow
Jarrin Solomon
4 × 400 m relay 3:00.38 1 Q N/A 2:59.40 NR  

* Jamol James was selected in the men's 4 × 100 m relay, but did not compete.

Field events
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Distance Position Distance Position
Keshorn Walcott Javelin throw 81.75 10 q 84.58 NR  
Women
Track & road events
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank Result Rank
Michelle-Lee Ahye 100 m Bye 11.28 3 Q 11.32 8 Did not advance
Kelly-Ann Baptiste Bye 10.96 1 Q 11.00 3 q 10.94 6
Janeil Bellille 400 m hurdles 57.27 7 N/A Did not advance
Semoy Hackett 100 m Bye 11.04 2 Q 11.26 5 Did not advance
200 m 22.81 2 Q N/A 22.55 3 q 22.87 8
Kai Selvon 200 m 22.85 4 q N/A 23.04 5 Did not advance
Michelle-Lee Ahye
Kelly-Ann Baptiste
Semoy Hackett
Sparkle McKnight
Kai Selvon
Reyare Thomas
4 × 100 m relay 42.31 NR 2 Q N/A DNF
Field events
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Distance Position Distance Position
Ayanna Alexander Triple jump 14.09 14 Did not advance
Cleopatra Borel Shot put 18.36 12 Did not advance

BoxingEdit

Trinidad and Tobago has qualified boxers for the following events.

Men
Athlete Event Round of 32 Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Carlos Suárez Light flyweight   Pehlivan (TUR)
L 6–16
Did not advance

CyclingEdit

TrackEdit

Sprint
Athlete Event Qualification Round 1 Repechage 1 Round 2 Repechage 2 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Opposition
Time
Speed (km/h)
Rank
Njisane Phillip Men's sprint 10.202
70.574
10   Dawkins (NZL)
W 10.221
70.443
Bye   Förstemann (GER)
W 10.467
68.787
Bye   Dmitriev (RUS)
W 10.545, W 10.300
  Kenny (GBR)
L, L
  Perkins (AUS)
L, L
4
Keirin
Athlete Event 1st Round Repechage 2nd Round Final
Rank Rank Rank Rank
Njisane Phillip Men's keirin 5 R 3 Q 4 7

SailingEdit

Trinidad and Tobago has qualified 1 boat for each of the following events

Men
Athlete Event Race Net points Final rank
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 M*
Andrew Lewis Laser 46 43 38 40 29 47 34 46 14 26 EL 315 37

M = Medal race; EL = Eliminated – did not advance into the medal race;

ShootingEdit

Men
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Points Rank Points Rank
Roger Daniel 10 m air pistol 568 36 Did not advance
50 m pistol 539 35 Did not advance

SwimmingEdit

Swimmers from Trinidad and Tobago have further achieved qualifying standards in the following events (up to a maximum of 2 swimmers in each event at the Olympic Qualifying Time (OQT), and potentially 1 at the Olympic Selection Time (OST)):[10][11]

Men
Athlete Event Heat Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
George Bovell 50 m freestyle 21.77 1 Q 21.77 5 Q 21.82 7
100 m freestyle DNS Did not advance
100 m backstroke 55.22 29 Did not advance

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Trinidad and Tobago". Sports-reference.com. 2012. Archived from the original on 25 September 2012. Retrieved 26 August 2012.
  2. ^ Palmer, Justin (11 August 2012). "Trinidad's Walcott takes surprise javelin gold". Reuters. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 11 August 2012.
  3. ^ "Walcott wins men's javelin gold for Trinidad and Tobago". Washington Post. 11 August 2012. Archived from the original on 12 August 2012. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  4. ^ "Tyson Gay gets one-year ban for failed drugs test". 2 May 2014. Archived from the original on 5 January 2018. Retrieved 26 April 2018 – via www.bbc.com.
  5. ^ "US stripped of London 2012 Olympic relay medals". 13 May 2015. Archived from the original on 27 April 2016. Retrieved 26 April 2018 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  6. ^ "USA men's 4 x 100m relay team disqualified from the 2012 London Olympic Games". olympic.org. 21 July 2016. Archived from the original on 31 May 2016. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  7. ^ "London 2012 4x100m relay men - Olympic Athletics". olympic.org. 3 June 2017. Archived from the original on 26 April 2018. Retrieved 26 April 2018.
  8. ^ "iaaf.org – Top Lists". IAAF. Archived from the original on 4 June 2011. Retrieved 4 June 2011.
  9. ^ IAAF Games of the XXX Olympiad – London 2012 ENTRY STANDARDS (PDF), IAAF, archived from the original (PDF) on 7 July 2012, retrieved 4 June 2011
  10. ^ "Swimming World Rankings". FINA. Archived from the original on 6 January 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2011.
  11. ^ FÉDÉRATION INTERNATIONALE DE NATATION – Swimming (PDF), FINA, archived from the original (PDF) on 26 July 2011, retrieved 8 June 2011

External linksEdit