Trebatius Testa

Gaius Trebatius Testa (C.84 BC-AD 4, fl. 1st century BC,) was a jurist of ancient Rome,[1] whose family, and himself, originated from Elea.

Friendship with Cicero and the CaesarsEdit

Some twenty years younger than Cicero, Trebatius was both a familiar friend and a protégé of the latter.[2] Cicero dedicated his Topica to Trebatius, and recommended Trebatius as a legal advisor to Julius Caesar, calling him a thorough gentleman and a "leading light in civil law".[3] Trebatius enjoyed Caesar's favor, making his fortune alongside him in Gaul, and supporting him in the Civil War.[4]

Later he also worked closely with Augustus, and was subsequently described in the Digest as being of the greatest authority for Augustan law.[5]

CharacterEdit

A good-humoured man - Cicero wrote of sending him "badinage in your own style"[6] - Trebatius was featured by Horace as a learned adviser in his Satires.[7] As well as a fondness for wine, Trebatius also seemed to enjoy swimming as a hobby.[8]

Legal career and influenceEdit

A pupil of Cornelius Maximus, Trebatius played a key part in the transfer of legal authority from the senate to individual jurisconsults under the Principate.[9]

An expert on sacral law,[10] Trebatius' writings included a de religionibus and de iure civili, but not even excerpts of these survive. He was, however, frequently cited by later jurists, and also had a high reputation as the teacher of Marcus Antistius Labeo.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ J Davie trans., Horace: Satires and Epistles (OUP 2011) p. 144
  2. ^ D R Shackleton Bailey trans., Cicero's Letters to his Friends (Atlanta 1988) p. xii and p. 828
  3. ^ D R Shackleton Bailey trans., Cicero's Letters to his Friends (Atlanta 1988) p. 73 ad fam. vii.5
  4. ^ D R Shackleton Bailey trans., Cicero's Letters to his Friends (Atlanta 1988) p. 85 and p. 828
  5. ^ A Bauman, Lawyers in Roman Transitional Politics (1985) p.124 (Inst. 2.25 pr.)
  6. ^ D R Shackleton Bailey trans., Cicero's Letters to his Friends (Atlanta 1988) p. 89 ad fam. vii.14
  7. ^ A Palmer ed., The Satires of Horace (London 1920) p. 242
  8. ^ A Palmer ed., The Satires of Horace (London 1920) p. 243
  9. ^ A Bauman, Lawyers in Roman Transitional Politics (1985) p. 2
  10. ^ A Bauman, Lawyers in Roman Transitional Politics (1985) p.123