Toyo Eiwa Jogakuin

Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin (東洋英和女学院, Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin) is a private girls academy founded on November 6, 1884, in Azabu, Minato, Tokyo by Martha J. Cartmell, a Methodist missionary from Canada.[1] Toyo Eiwa Women's University, established as a four-year college in 1989, is attached to the school.

Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin
東洋英和女学院;
Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin
Toyo Eiwa Jogakuin junior high school and high school Tokyo.jpg
TypePrivate
Established1884
Location, ,
WebsiteOfficial website

HistoryEdit

Originally begun in 1884 with two students, an elementary school was added in 1888, and a senior high school in 1889.[1] The school expanded to include a kindergarten class in 1914, a dormitory, kindergarten building, and a house for the Methodist missionaries in 1932, and a brand new building for the school in 1933.[2]

Due to the anti-Western sentiment during World War II, the Ei () (meaning "English") in Eiwa (英和) was changed to Ei (), meaning "eternal" or "eternity", in 1941.[2] The name was changed back in 1946.[3] Because of the changes made in the Japanese education system following World War II, each department changed its name to reflect the new government-approved names. In 1965, facilities were expanded to include a location at Oiwake, Karuizawa, Nagano Prefecture and camp was established in 1970 at Lake Nojiri.[3][4]

In 1986, the junior college was moved to a campus in Midori-ku, Yokohama, the attached women's university became a four-year college in 1989, and opened its graduate school in 1993.[5]

Notable graduatesEdit

Fictional referencesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b See History of Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin, page 1 Archived 2006-04-30 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed June 15, 2006]
  2. ^ a b See History of Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin, page 2 Archived 2005-03-07 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed June 15, 2006.
  3. ^ a b See History of Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin, page 3 Archived 2005-03-07 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed June 15, 2006.
  4. ^ See World Lakes Database Archived 2005-11-20 at the Wayback Machine and Nagano Prefecture Tourism Information Archived 2007-05-02 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed June 15, 2006.
  5. ^ See History of Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin, page 4 Archived 2007-03-29 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed June 15, 2006.
  6. ^ History of Tōyō Eiwa Jogakuin. Accessed April 29, 2018.

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 35°30′33″N 139°30′38″E / 35.50917°N 139.51056°E / 35.50917; 139.51056