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A tortilla (/tɔːrˈtə/, Spanish: [toɾˈtiʎa]) is a type of thin, unleavened flatbread, typically made from corn or wheat. In Spanish, "tortilla" means "small torta", or "small cake". It was first made by the indigenous peoples of Mesoamerica before European contact. The Aztecs and other Nahuatl speakers call tortillas tlaxcalli ([t͡ɬaʃˈkalli]).[1]

Tortilla
Tortilla2.JPG
TypeFlatbread
Place of originMesoamerica
Main ingredientsFlour

Tortilla is not to be confused with the Spanish omelette (known as tortilla española, tortilla de patatas, or tortilla de papas in Spanish) that is consumed in South America and Spain.


VarietiesEdit

Corn tortillaEdit

Tortillas made with maize (corn) are the oldest variety of tortilla, and remain very popular in Mexico and Central America.

Wheat tortillaEdit

Wheat was not grown in the Americas prior to the arrival of Europeans, but is a common source of flour for tortillas today.

Flour tortillas originated in the Texas-Mexico border region where the Mexican and Anglo cultures came in close contact and enormously influenced each other. Flour tortillas usually contain lard and salt, but otherwise the preparation and cooking of flour tortillas on a comal is identical to that of corn tortillas. Flour tortillas are commonly used in burritos, tacos, fajitas, and other Tex-Mex foods, especially if eaten with hands, as flour tortillas hold together with damp foods better than corn tortillas.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Nahuatl Dictionary. (1997). Wired Humanities Project. University of Oregon. Retrieved August 29, 2012, from link