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The Toronto Furies are a professional women's ice hockey team that plays in Toronto, Ontario, as members of the Canadian Women's Hockey League. The Toronto Furies play their home games at the Mastercard Centre in Toronto, Ontario. The team was established in 2010 as an expansion team called Toronto CWHL during a league-wide restructuring. The team adopted the name "Furies" after the 2011 Clarkson Cup.

Toronto Furies
2018–19 CWHL season
Toront Furies logo.png
CityToronto, Ontario
LeagueCanadian Women's Hockey League
Founded2011
Home arenaMastercard Centre
ColoursBlue and white
         
Owner(s)CWHL
General managerSami Jo Small
Head coachCourtney Kessel
CaptainNatalie Spooner
Websitetoronto.thecwhl.com
Franchise history
2010–2011Toronto CWHL
2011–presentToronto Furies
Championships
Playoff championships1 (2013–14)

The club won the 2014 Clarkson Cup championship in 1–0 overtime victory over the Boston Blades.

Contents

HistoryEdit

Prior to the 2010–11 season, the Canadian Women's Hockey League (CWHL) underwent a structural reorganization. The CWHL considered the restructure a relaunch of the league.[1] Among the changes included the Mississauga Chiefs, Ottawa Senators and Vaughan Flames teams ceasing operations,[2] adding a new team in Toronto. The relaunch also branded the five teams after their respective locations, simply calling the new teams by their locations such as "Toronto CWHL". However, the CWHL teams that were playing in previous markets were commonly referred to as their former names, and the new Toronto team was sometimes called the Toronto Aeros after a former NWHL team that ceased operations in 2007[3] or Toronto HC.[4] The league held its first player draft on August 12, 2010, although it was only for the three Greater Toronto Area teams as the league decided that since they do not pay a salary, it would be unfair to force players to be based outside their hometown.[5] The new Toronto team protected former Mississauga Chiefs' Jennifer Botterill and Sami Jo Small and acquired many of the former Chiefs' players in the draft.[6]

The Toronto CWHL team finished the 2010–11 regular season in fourth place and qualified for the 2011 Clarkson Cup by defeating fellow CHWL expansion team and third place finisher, the Boston Blades two games to none in playoff. The team then defeated the Brampton Thunder 3–2 and the Minnesota Whitecaps 6–0 during the Clarkson Cup round-robin to advance to the championship game. Toronto then lost 5–0 to the Montreal Stars. The team adopted the Toronto Furies name after the season ended. The decision behind naming the franchise Furies was featured on an episode of History Television's program What's In a Name? aired on September 12, 2011.[7] Players voted on one of five names suggested by fans. The five names that fans suggested included: the Toronto Force, Toronto Tornadoes, Toronto Snipes, Toronto Furies and the Toronto Vamps.

Two Furies players became the fourth and fifth women to play 150 career games in 2013–14. On November 16, 2013, Kristy Zamora reached the milestone. On November 23, 2013, a 4–2 victory over Brampton provided Meagan Aarts with her 150th game.

During the 2013–14 CWHL season, there were a handful of milestones which the Furies reached. On February 9, 2014, a victory against the defending Clarkson Cup champion Boston Blades provided Furies goaltender Sami Jo Small with the 60th victory of her career. With the win, she became the first CWHL goaltender to reach the 60 wins plateau.[8] A March 8 game against the Brampton Thunder resulted in Meagan Aarts earning the 100 point in her CWHL career.[9]

The Furies defeated the Boston Blades by a 1–0 tally in overtime to claim their first Clarkson Cup title in 2014.[10] The tournament was played at Markham Centennial Centre. With the victory, Natalie Spooner became the first woman in hockey history to claim the gold medal in the Olympic Winter Games and the Clarkson Cup in the same year.

During the summer of 2016, Kori Cheverie retired from the Furies with three franchise records: points (82), games played (152) and power play goals (14). In addition, she holds the league record for most consecutive games played with 152.[when?]

On June 11, 2018, inaugural member Sami Jo Small was named general manager of the Furies.[11] Among her first moves was signing Courtney Birchard as their new head coach. In addition, Ken Dufton was named as an advisor to the team.[12] On the free agent market, Small signed goaltender Elaine Chuli[13] and forward Shiann Darkangelo to contracts in August 2018.

 
Sami Jo Small

Season-by-season recordsEdit

Year GP W L OTL SOL GF GA Pts Finish Playoffs
2010–11 26 8 13 0 5 83 98 21 4th Lost 2011 Clarkson Cup championship game, 0–5 vs. Montreal Stars
2011–12 27 9 13 2 3 75 105 26 4th Eliminated in 2012 Clarkson Cup round-robin
2012–13 24 10 13 1 0 60 72 21 4th Eliminated in 2013 Clarkson Cup round-robin
2012–13 23 10 10 1 2 70 61 23 4th Won 2014 Clarkson Cup championship game, 1–0 (OT) vs. Boston Blades
2014–15 24 8 13 1 2 51 88 19 4th Lost 2015 Clarkson Cup semifinals, 0–2 vs. Boston Blades
2015–16 24 6 16 1 1 59 87 14 4th Lost 2016 Clarkson Cup semifinals, 0–2 vs. Les Canadiennes
2016–17 24 9 11 3 1 52 58 22 4th Lost 2016 Clarkson Cup semifinals, 1–2 vs. Calgary Inferno
2017–18 28 9 17 1 1 56 99 20 6th Did not qualify

Current rosterEdit

Updated October 30, 2018.[14][15]

# Nat Player Pos S/G Age Acquired Birthplace
2   Julie Allen F R 31 2013 Brampton, Ontario
  Alysha Burriss F L 23 2018 Napanee, Ontario
9   Mellissa Channell D L 24 2018 Oakville, Ontario
29   Elaine Chuli G L 24 2018 Waterford, Ontario
22   Shiann Darkangelo LW L 25 2018 Royal Oak, Michigan
14   Renata Fast D R 24 2016 Hamilton, Ontario
4   Julie Fedeski D L 22 2018 Orillia, Ontario
17   Emily Fulton F L 26 2015 Stratford, Ontario
37   Anissa Gamble F R 26 2018 Fredericton, New Brunswick
25   Emma Greco D L 23 2018 Burlington, Ontario
96   Jordan Hampton D R 24 2018 Foxborough, Massachusetts
3   Brittany Howard F R 23 2018 St. Thomas, Ontario
28   Mackenzie MacNeil F R 23 2018 Richmond Hill, Ontario
34   Amanda Makela G L 25 2017 Thunder Bay, Ontario
23   Shannon Moulson D L 32 2012 Mississauga, Ontario
16   Sarah Nurse F L 24 2018 Burlington, Ontario
11   Jessica Platt D L 29 2016 Sarnia, Ontario
27   Carolyne Prevost F L 29 2013 Sarnia, Ontario
21   Megan Quinn D R 22 2018 Belleville, Ontario
24   Natalie Spooner F R 28 2012 Toronto, Ontario
10   Shannon Stewart F R 25 2017 Pickering, Ontario
6   Sena Suzuki D L 27 2015 Hokkaido, Japan
35   Shea Tiley G L 22 2018 Shallow Lake, Ontario
12   Jessica Vella F R 27 2018 Pickering, Ontario
19   Brittany Zuback F L 25 2018 Thunder Bay, Ontario

CoachesEdit

Scoring leadersEdit

Year-by-yearEdit

Season Leader (F) GP G A Pts Leader (D) GP G A Pts PPG SHG GWG
2010–11[16] Jennifer Botterill 25 14 30 44 Britni Smith 29 8 21 29 Tessa Bonhomme (4) Three tied with 1 Bonhomme (3)
2011–12[17] Mallory Deluce 20 12 9 21 Tessa Bonhomme 24 4 12 16 Kori Cheverie (6) Three tied with 1 Deluce (4)
2012–13[18] Rebecca Johnston 24 8 17 25 Tessa Bonhomme 24 4 5 9 Six tied with 1 Natalie Spooner (3) Spooner (3)
2013–14[19] Carolyne Prevost 23 11 12 23 Michelle Bonello 22 2 10 12 Prevost and Alyssa Baldin (4) Prevost (1) Katie Wilson (3)
2014–15 Jenelle Kohanchuk 21 7 10 17 Megan Bozek 22 3 7 10 Carolyne Prevost (4) None Prevost (3)
2015–16 Natalie Spooner 22 17 13 30 Michelle Bonello 24 0 8 8 Spooner (5) Spooner (2) Kori Cheverie (2)
2016–17 Natalie Spooner 20 13 7 20

Draft picksEdit

  • These are the first selections for every respective draft that Toronto participated in.
Draft year Player Pick College
2010 Tessa Bonhomme 1st Overall Ohio State Buckeyes
2011 Jesse Scanzano[20] 5th Overall Mercyhurst Lakers
2012 Rebecca Johnston 2nd Overall Cornell Big Red
2013 Katie Wilson 2nd Overall Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs
2014 Megan Bozek 2nd Overall Minnesota Golden Gophers
2015 Emily Fulton 2nd Overall Cornell Big Red
2016 Renata Fast 2nd Overall Clarkson

Awards and honoursEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Elite Women's Hockey Action Starts". CWHL.ca. October 21, 2010. Archived from the original on November 21, 2010.
  2. ^ "NEWS - The "NEW" Canadian Women's Hockey League" (Press release). Ottawa Senators. June 7, 2010. Archived from the original on July 18, 2018. Retrieved August 9, 2010.
  3. ^ "Aeros History". TorontoAeros.com. Retrieved September 28, 2018.
  4. ^ "What it's all about..." CWHL.com. February 25, 2011. Archived from the original on October 2, 2011.
  5. ^ "Women's Elite Hockey "First Ever" Draft". CWHL.ca. August 12, 2010. Archived from the original on November 21, 2010.
  6. ^ "Toronto 2010–11 draft". Archived from the original on April 5, 2011.
  7. ^ "Canadian TV Guide - Your guide to Canadian TV News, TV Reviews, TV Listings and so much more". Canadian TV Guide. Retrieved 30 October 2018.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-05-06. Retrieved 2014-05-07.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-05-06. Retrieved 2014-05-07.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-03-25. Retrieved 2016-06-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ Donna Spencer, The Canadian Press (11 June 2018). "Sami Jo Small named GM of CWHL's Toronto Furies". The Toronto Star. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  12. ^ Press Release (31 July 2018). "Kessel New Head Coach, Dufton New Advisor". Toronto Furies. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  13. ^ Press Release (1 August 2018). "Toronto Adds Free Agent Goaltender Elaine Chuli". Toronto Furies. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  14. ^ "Toronto Furies Roster". Toronto Furies. Retrieved 15 August 2016.
  15. ^ "Toronto Furies Elite Prospects". eliteprospects.com. Retrieved January 5, 2016.
  16. ^ "CWHL: Boston Blades | Pointstreak Stats". Cwhlboston_hockey.stats.pointstreak.com. Retrieved 2017-07-06.
  17. ^ "CWHL: Boston Blades | Pointstreak Stats". Cwhlboston_hockey.stats.pointstreak.com. Retrieved 2017-07-06.
  18. ^ [1]
  19. ^ [2]
  20. ^ [3]
  21. ^ "Sudbury Lady Wolves and Red Deer Chiefs to meet for gold medal at 2015 Esso Cup; award winners announced : NR.052.15". hockeycanadawest.ca. 2015-04-25. Retrieved 2016-06-22.
  22. ^ [4]

External linksEdit