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Torasemide, also known as torsemide, is a medication used to treat high blood pressure and fluid overload due heart failure, kidney disease, and liver disease.[1] It is a less preferred treatment for high blood pressure.[1] It is taken by mouth or by injection into a vein.[1]

Torasemide
Torasemide.svg
Torasemide bas.png
Clinical data
Trade namesDemadex, Tortas, others
SynonymsTorsemide
AHFS/Drugs.comMonograph
MedlinePlusa601212
Pregnancy
category
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Routes of
administration
By mouth, IV
Drug classLoop diuretic
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability80-90%
Protein bindingHighly bound (>99%).
MetabolismHepatic (80%)
Elimination half-life3.5 hours; Cirrhosis: 7-8 hours
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
IUPHAR/BPS
DrugBank
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEBI
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.164.924 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC16H20N4O3S
Molar mass348.421 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
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Common side effects include headache, increased urination, diarrhea, cough, and dizziness.[1] Other side effects may include hearing loss and low blood potassium.[1] Torasemide is a sulfonamide and loop diuretic.[1] Use is not recommended in pregnancy or breastfeeding.[2] It works by decreasing the reabsorption of sodium by the kidneys.[1]

Torasemide was patented in 1974 and came into medical use in 1993.[3] It is avaliable as a generic medication.[2] A month supply in the United Kingdom costs the NHS less than 10 £ as of 2019.[2] In the United States the wholesale cost of this amount is about XXX USD.[4]In 2016 it was the 234th most prescribed medication in the United States with more than 2 million prescriptions.[5]

Contents

Medical usesEdit

It is used to treat fluid overload due heart failure and high blood pressure.[1] In heart failure it may improve outcomes more than furosemide.[6][7]

Side effectsEdit

No evidence of torasemide-induced ototoxicity has been demonstrated in humans.[8]

ChemistryEdit

Compared with other loop diuretics, torasemide has a more prolonged diuretic effect than equipotent doses of furosemide and relatively decreased potassium loss.

NamesEdit

Torasemide is the recommended name of the drug (rINN) according to the (INN), which is the drug naming system coordinated by the World Health Organization. Torsemide is the official name of the drug according to the (USAN), which is the drug naming system coordinated by the USAN Council, which is co-sponsored by the American Medical Association (AMA), the United States Pharmacopeial Convention (USP), and the American Pharmacists Association (APhA).

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Torsemide Monograph for Professionals". Drugs.com. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  2. ^ a b c British national formulary : BNF 76 (76 ed.). Pharmaceutical Press. 2018. pp. 227–228. ISBN 9780857113382.
  3. ^ Fischer, Jnos; Ganellin, C. Robin (2006). Analogue-based Drug Discovery. John Wiley & Sons. p. 458. ISBN 9783527607495.
  4. ^ "NADAC as of 2019-02-27". Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Retrieved 3 March 2019.
  5. ^ "The Top 300 of 2019". clincalc.com. Retrieved 22 December 2018.
  6. ^ Roush GC, Kaur R, Ernst ME (2014). "Diuretics: a review and update". J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol. Ther. 19 (1): 5–13. doi:10.1177/1074248413497257. PMID 24243991.
  7. ^ Buggey J, Mentz RJ, Pitt B, Eisenstein EL, Anstrom KJ, Velazquez EJ, O'Connor CM (2015). "A reappraisal of loop diuretic choice in heart failure patients". Am. Heart J. 169 (3): 323–33. doi:10.1016/j.ahj.2014.12.009. PMC 4346710. PMID 25728721.
  8. ^ Dunn CJ, Fitton A, Brogden RN (January 1995). "Torasemide. An update of its pharmacological properties and therapeutic efficacy". Drugs. 49 (1): 121–42. doi:10.2165/00003495-199549010-00009. PMID 7705212.

External linksEdit