Tokyo Journal is an English-language quarterly magazine about Tokyo and Japan, which was established in 1981. The international edition of the magazine was published under the title Japan Journal for a time.[1]

Tokyo Journal
First issue1981
CompanyAuthentasia, Inc.
CountryJapan/International
LanguageEnglish
Websitewww.tokyojournal.com
ISSN0289-811X
OCLC13995159

HistoryEdit

Tokyo Journal was founded in 1981, and owned for a number of years by the Japanese magazine distributor Yohan.[2] Its editors-in-chief have included Don Morton and Greg Starr.[3][4] In 1987, Boyé Lafayette De Mente became Associate Publisher of the Tokyo Journal. Together with Editor Glenn Davis, they made Tokyo Journal the first publication in Japan to produce a magazine on a computer from scratch using Apple Macintosh computers.[5] He later returned as a regular contributor to the Tokyo Journal, which continues to print articles he left to the magazine in tribute to him. The magazine was later sold to the Tokyo-based translation and publishing company Nexxus Communications K.K.[2] Ownership was transferred to Authentasia, Inc.Tokyo Journal is the oldest English magazine still on sale in Japanese bookstores.[2]

StyleEdit

The magazine's approach has been to cover Japanese culture as seen through the eyes of those who know and live it.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Tokyo Journal". CiNii. National Institute of Informatics. Retrieved 29 December 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d "The Oldest English Magazine Sold in Japanese Bookstores Is Back on the Shelf". Financial Content. 4 September 2012. Retrieved 14 April 2014.
  3. ^ Gianni Simone (26 April 2011). "English mags approach milestone, crossroads". The Japan Times Online (in Japanese). p. 12. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  4. ^ Bruce Rutledge (22 July 2011). "The death of publishing: Where are Tokyo's English magazines now?". CNN. Retrieved 7 October 2016.
  5. ^ DeMente, Boye Lafayette (2012), The Incredible Power of Serendipity! Highlights of an Uncommon Life! Paradise Valley, CA: Createspace Independent

External linksEdit