Tivoli railway station

Tivoli railway station was a non-public timetable railway station[a] operated by the South Eastern Railway (SER) between 1848 and c. 1873.

Tivoli railway station
General information
LocationMargate, Thanet, Kent
England
Coordinates51°22′44″N 1°22′49″E / 51.37889°N 1.38028°E / 51.37889; 1.38028Coordinates: 51°22′44″N 1°22′49″E / 51.37889°N 1.38028°E / 51.37889; 1.38028
Grid referenceTR35316983
Platforms1
Other information
StatusDisused
History
Original companySouth Eastern Railway
Key dates
20 July 1848 (1848-07-20)Opened[1]
c. 1867[1]Closed
Ramsgate and Margate
Margate Sands
Margate West
Chatham Main Line
to London Victoria
Line closed north and south of
Margate Sands Goods in 1926.
Margate East
Tivoli
Broadstairs
To Ashford and Dover
Dumpton Park
St Lawrence
for Pegwell Bay
Ramsgate
Ramsgate Town
Ramsgate Harbour

The arrangement inherited by the Southern Railway in 1923 with the lines and stations closed in 1926 shown in pink (Tivoli had closed c.1867 and St Lawrence for Pegwell Bay had closed in 1916). The dotted line represent the new surface lines and stations. Ramsgate and Dumpton Park both opened in 1926. Margate Sands Goods closed in 1972. The diagram shows the position as of 1926.

HistoryEdit

The Tivoli Gardens in Margate opened in 1829.[2] In December 1846 the SER opened its line from Ramsgate to a terminus at Margate Sands.[3] The Tivoli Gardens lay alongside the railway line, approximately 940 yards (860 metres) south of Margate Sands station and the manager of the gardens, a Mr Divers, negotiated with the SER to open a station to serve the gardens. The station, a single platform with steps down to the gardens opened on 20 July 1848 and was located on the opposite side of Tivoli Road from the gardens.[4][5] The station was not served by scheduled passenger trains but only by excursions to the gardens and race meetings at Margate Racecourse, situated nearby at Shottendane.[6]

The gardens closed in 1867[1] and the last recorded race meeting was in 1871.[7][8] Closure of the station was probably concurrent with these closures although the actual date of the station is unknown. The Railway Magazine for June 1906 stated that it had been over 30 years since the station closed.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Quick, Michael (2019) [2001]. Railway passenger stations in Great Britain: a chronology (PDF) (5th ed.). Railway & Canal Historical Society. p. 423.
  2. ^ Wood, Jason, ed. (2017). The amusement park: history, culture and the heritage of pleasure. Routledge. p. 254. ISBN 978-1472423726.
  3. ^ "Opening of the Margate branch of the South-Eastern Railway". Kentish Gazette. No. 7, 483. 8 December 1846. p. 2 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  4. ^ "Margate. Tivoli Gardens and New Railway Station". Kentish Gazette. No. 7, 564. 25 July 1848. p. 3 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ Whittingham, Chris (2007). A centenary history of Margate lawn tennis club (PDF). p. 2.
  6. ^ a b "Pertinent Paragraphs". The Railway Magazine. Vol. 19, no. 108. June 1906. p. 473.
  7. ^ "Margate Racecourse". Racecourses: Here today and gone tomorrow. Retrieved 4 March 2020.
  8. ^ Dreamland Margate. Margate Renewal Partnership. 2009. p. 3.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Non-public timetable stations were stations that did not feature in the publicly advertised railway timetable and were, for example, for internal railway use only or only served by excursion trains rather than regular services.