Tiridates (son of Tiran of Armenia)

Tiridates (Armenian: Տրդատ, flourished 4th century, died between 364 and 375) was a Prince from the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia.

Tiridates was the third born son to the Roman Client King of Armenia, Tiran[1] (Tigranes VII, r. 339–350), and brother of Arsaces II (Arshak II), King from 350 until 368.

The Sassanid King Shapur II launched a war on Rome and her allies, firstly by persecuting the Christians that lived in Persia and Mesopotamia.[2] In his father’s reign, Shapur II with his army had invaded Armenia; eventually taking Tiridates with members of his family as hostages[3] as they were betrayed to Shapur II by his father’s chamberlain.[4][5] Tiridates along with members of his family had become Sassanid political prisoners in which his father was blinded and thrown into prison after Shapur II accused his father of collusion with Rome.[6]

The nobles of Armenia were infuriated by the brutality of Shapur II and his treatment of Tiridates with members of his family, took up arms and fought against Shapur II and his army with assistance from the Romans.[7] They successfully drove Shapur II and his army out from Armenia. After Shapur II was defeated, he had signed a treaty and Tiridates with members of his family were released from prison.

Not much is known on his life and his relationship with Arsaces II. During the reign of the Roman emperor Valentinian I, who ruled from 364 until 375, Tiridates was sent as a political hostage to Constantinople and was executed on the orders of Valentinian I during Arsaces II’s reconciliation with the Sassanid Empire.[8] Tiridates married an unnamed woman by whom he had a son called Gnel, also known as Gnelus.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Movses Khorenatsi’ History of Armenia, 5th Century, Book III, Chapter 13
  2. ^ Kurkjian, A History of Armenia, p.103
  3. ^ Kurkjian, A History of Armenia, p.103
  4. ^ Kurkjian, A History of Armenia, p.103
  5. ^ Encyclopaedia Iranica: Armenia and Iran II. The pre-Islamic period, 5. The Sasanian period I: Armenia between Rome and Iran. b. The Christian Arsacids: Tiridates III and his successors until the partition
  6. ^ Kurkjian, A History of Armenia, p.103
  7. ^ Kurkjian, A History of Armenia, p.103
  8. ^ Movses Khorenatsi’ History of Armenia, 5th Century, Book III, Chapter 21
  9. ^ Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

SourcesEdit