Tinodon

Tinodon is an extinct genus of mammal alive 155-140.2 million years ago (Oxfordian-Berriasian) which has been found in the Morrison Formation (United States),[2] the Alcobaça Formation (Portugal) and the Lulworth Formation (England). It is of uncertain affinities, being most recently recovered as closer to therians than eutriconodonts but less so than allotherians.[3] Two species are known: T. bellus (Marsh, 1879) and B. micron (Ensom & Sigogneau-Russell, 2000[1]).

Tinodon
Temporal range: Oxfordian-early Berriasian, 155–140.2 Ma
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
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Genus:
Tinodon

Marsh, 1879
Binomial name
Tinodon bellus
Marsh, 1879
Other species
  • T. micron Ensom & Sigogneau-Russell, 2000[1]
Synonyms
  • Amphidon aequicrurius Simpson, 1925
  • Eurylambda aequicrurius Simpson, 1929
  • Menacodon rarus Marsh, 1887
  • Tinodon lepidus Marsh, 1879

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b P. Ensom and D. Sigogneau-Russell. 2000. New symmetrodonts (Mammalia, Theria) from the Purbeck Limestone Group, Lower Cretaceous, southern England. Cretaceous Research 21:767-779
  2. ^ Foster, J. (2007). "Appendix." Jurassic West: The Dinosaurs of the Morrison Formation and Their World. Indiana University Press. pp. 327-329.
  3. ^ S. Bi, Y. Wang, J. Guan, Z. Sheng, and J. Meng. 2014. Three new Jurassic euharamiyidan species reinforce early divergence of mammals. Nature 514:579-584 [P. Mannion/J. Tennant]