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Timeline of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season

A map of the Atlantic Ocean depicting the tracks of sixteen tropical cyclones
Track map of all Atlantic tropical cyclones in 2018

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season was an above-average season for tropical cyclones for the third consecutive year. Though the season officially began on June 1 and continued until November 30, dates which are adopted by convention and historically describe the period during each year when most tropical cyclones form,[1] it effectively started with the formation of Tropical Storm Alberto on May 25.[2] The season's final storm, Hurricane Oscar, dissipated on October 31.[3]

The year produced sixteen tropical depressions, all but one of which further intensified into named tropical storms. Of the fifteen named storms, eight developed into hurricanes, and two further intensified into major hurricanes, which are rated Category 3 or higher on the Saffir–Simpson scale. These two major hurricanes contributed to a majority of the season's severe destruction and loss of life, mainly in the United States.

Hurricane Florence formed near Cabo Verde on August 31, steered toward the west-northwest with little exception by a large area of high pressure to its north. The cyclone strengthened amid favorable environmental factors, becoming a Category 4 hurricane with maximum sustained winds of 150 mph (240 km/h) at its peak, but weakening occurred before Florence struck the coastline of North Carolina near Wrightsville Beach on September 14, with winds of 90 mph (150 km/h). Florence dealt a devastating blow to the Carolinas as it meandered across the region. Catastrophic, record-breaking flooding contributed to a majority of the storm's $24 billion in damage and 52 deaths, though significant storm surge along the coastline as well as an inland tornado outbreak caused severe damage as well.[4] In early October, Hurricane Michael formed in the western Caribbean Sea, resulting in significant flooding across Central America and Cuba. However, the majority of the storm's impact was felt in the Florida Panhandle, where Michael struck the coastline near Mexico Beach as a Category 5 hurricane, with winds of 160 mph (260 km/h). This constituted the first landfall of a Category 5 hurricane in the United States since Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and only the fifth in recorded history, alongside "Labor Day", Camille, and "Okeechobee". In addition, Michael became the third deepest by atmospheric pressure, the fourth strongest by maximum winds, and the latest Category 5 hurricane to strike the United States on record. Michael killed 74 people and caused $25 billion in damage.[5]

This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season. It includes information that was not released throughout the season, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as a storm that was not initially warned upon, has been included.

Contents

Timeline of eventsEdit

Hurricane MichaelHurricane Leslie (2018)Tropical Storm Gordon (2018)Hurricane FlorenceHurricane BerylTropical Storm Alberto (2018)Saffir–Simpson scale 

MayEdit

May 25

May 26

 
Storm path of Tropical Storm Alberto

May 28

May 29

May 31

JuneEdit

  • No tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean during the month of June.

June 1

  • The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season officially begins.[1]

JulyEdit

July 4

 
Hurricane Beryl on July 6

July 5

July 6

July 7

July 8

 
Chris as an intensifying Category 1 hurricane on July 10

July 10

July 11

July 12

July 14

July 16

AugustEdit

 
Storm path of Tropical Storm Debby

August 7

August 8

August 9

August 15

 
Storm path of Tropical Storm Ernesto

August 16

August 17

August 18

August 31

SeptemberEdit

 
Gordon shortly before landfall on September 4.

September 1

September 3

September 4

September 5

September 6

September 7

 
Hurricane Helene on September 11

September 8

September 9

September 10

 
Storm path of Hurricane Isaac
 
Hurricane Florence at peak strength on September 11.

September 11

September 12

September 13

September 14

 
Storm path of Tropical Storm Joyce

September 15

September 16

September 17

September 19

 
Storm path of Tropical Depression Eleven

September 21

September 22

September 23

 
Tropical Storm Kirk near peak intensity on September 26.

September 25

September 26

September 28

September 29

 
Storm path of Hurricane Leslie

OctoberEdit

October 3

October 4

October 7

October 8

 
Michael minutes before moving ashore as a Category 5 hurricane on October 10

October 9

October 10

 
Storm path of Tropical Storm Nadine

October 11

October 12

October 13

October 26

 
Oscar as an intensifying hurricane on October 29

October 27

October 28

October 29

October 30

October 31

NovemberEdit

  • No tropical cyclones form in the Atlantic Ocean during the month of November.

November 30

  • The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season officially ends.[1]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Christopher W. Landsea; Neal Dorst; Erica Rule (June 2, 2011). "G: Tropical Cyclone Climatology". Hurricane Research Division: Frequently Asked Questions. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. G1) When is hurricane season ?. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Robbie J. Berg (October 18, 2018). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Alberto (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved April 19, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Daniel P. Brown (February 19, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Oscar (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Stacy R. Stewart; Robbie J. Berg (May 3, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Florence (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 3, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l John L. Beven II; Robbie J. Berg; Andrew Hagen (April 19, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Michael (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Lixion A. Avila; Cody L. Fritz (September 20, 2018). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Beryl (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved April 21, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Eric S. Blake (December 14, 2018). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Chris (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved April 21, 2019.
  8. ^ a b c d Richard J. Pasch (March 28, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Debby (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved April 22, 2019.
  9. ^ a b c d e f John L. Beven II (April 2, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Ernesto (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved April 22, 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d e f Daniel P. Brown; Andrew Latto; Robbie J. Berg (February 19, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Gordon (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i John P. Cangialosi (December 13, 2018). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Helene (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  12. ^ a b c d e f David A. Zelinsky (January 30, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Isaac (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  13. ^ a b c d e Robbie J. Berg (January 30, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Joyce (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  14. ^ a b c Lixion A. Avila (November 9, 2018). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Depression Eleven (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h Eric S. Blake (January 29, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Kirk (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Richard J. Pasch; David P. Roberts (March 29, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Hurricane Leslie (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  17. ^ a b c d e Stacy R. Stewart (March 22, 2019). Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Nadine (PDF) (Report). Miami, Florida: National Hurricane Center. Retrieved May 5, 2019.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
2017
Atlantic hurricane season timelines
2018
Succeeded by
2019