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Timeline of nuclear weapons development

This timeline of nuclear weapons development is a chronological catalog of the evolution of nuclear weapons rooting from the development of the science surrounding nuclear fission and nuclear fusion. In addition to the scientific advancements, this timeline also includes several political events relating to the development of nuclear weapons. The availability of intelligence on recent advancements in nuclear weapons of several major countries (such as United States and the Soviet Union) is limited because of the classification of technical knowledge of nuclear weapons development.

Before 1930Edit

1930–1940Edit

1940–1950Edit

1950–1960Edit

1960–1970Edit

1970–1980Edit

1980–1990Edit

1990–2000Edit

2000–2010Edit

2010–presentEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

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