Timeline of Zanzibar City

The following is a timeline of the history of Zanzibar City, Unguja island, Zanzibar, Tanzania. The city is composed of Ng'ambo and Stone Town. Until recently it was known as Zanzibar Town.

Prior to 19th centuryEdit

  • 1700 – Old Fort of Zanzibar is built by Omanis (approximate date).[1]
  • 1710 – Fatima in power.[2]
  • 1746 – "Arab garrison" installed in fort.[2]
  • 1753 – Fort "unsuccessfully attacked by Mazrui Arabs from Mombasa."[2]
  • 1784 – Zanzibar becomes part of Oman.[2]

19th centuryEdit

20th centuryEdit

21st centuryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Zanzibar". Islamic Cultural Heritage Database. Istanbul: Organization of Islamic Cooperation, Research Centre for Islamic History, Art and Culture. Archived from the original on 4 July 2013. Retrieved 29 May 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d Pearce 1920.
  3. ^ a b c Petersen 1996.
  4. ^ a b c d Britannica 1910.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Stanley 2008.
  6. ^ Norman Robert Bennett (1973). "France and Zanzibar, 1844 to the 1860s". International Journal of African Historical Studies. 6 (4): 602–632. doi:10.2307/217223. JSTOR 217223.
  7. ^ "36 Hours in Zanzibar, Tanzania", The New York Times, 1 May 2014
  8. ^ M. Catharine Newbury (1983). "Colonialism, Ethnicity, and Rural Political Protest: Rwanda and Zanzibar in Comparative Perspective". Comparative Politics. 15 (3): 253–280. doi:10.2307/421681. JSTOR 421681.
  9. ^ "Zanzibar (Sultanate)", Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.), New York: Encyclopædia Britannica Co., 1910, OCLC 14782424
  10. ^ Frederick Cooper (1980), From slaves to squatters: plantation labor and agriculture in Zanzibar and coastal Kenya, 1890-1925, New Haven: Yale University Press, ISBN 0300024541
  11. ^ Ethel Younghusband (1910), "Zanzibar (etc.)", Glimpses of East Africa and Zanzibar, London: J. Long, OCLC 4793682
  12. ^ Africa Pilot. Washington DC: U.S. Navy. 1916.
  13. ^ Karin Adahl and Mikael Ahlund, ed. (2000). "Tanzania". Islamic Art Collections: An International Survey. Curzon Press. ISBN 978-1-136-11362-8.
  14. ^ Myers 1997.
  15. ^ a b c ArchNet. "Zanzibar". MIT School of Architecture and Planning. Archived from the original on 14 October 2012.
  16. ^ Anthony Clayton (1976), 1948 Zanzibar General Strike, Sweden: Nordic Africa Institute – via International Relations and Security Network
  17. ^ "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1955. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations.
  18. ^ Michael Lofchie (1963). "Party Conflict in Zanzibar". Journal of Modern African Studies. 1 (2): 185–207. doi:10.1017/S0022278X00001051. JSTOR 159028.
  19. ^ Roman Loimeier (2009). Between social skills and marketable skills: the politics of Islamic education in 20th century Zanzibar. Leiden: Brill. ISBN 9789004175426.
  20. ^ a b c Myers 1994.
  21. ^ United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1987). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1985 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 247–289.
  22. ^ a b c Siravo 1999.
  23. ^ a b "Eastern Africa, 1900 A.D.–present: Key Events". Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art. Retrieved 30 August 2015.
  24. ^ "Islamist riots threaten Zanzibar's stability". IRIN. United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. 24 October 2012.
  25. ^ Zanzibar acid attack, 9 August 2013, Daily Mirror
  26. ^ Zanzibar mosque bombing kills one, wounds seven, Reuters, 14 June 2014

BibliographyEdit

Published in 19th century
Published in 20th century
Published in 21st century

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 6°09′57″S 39°11′57″E / 6.165833°S 39.199167°E / -6.165833; 39.199167