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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Riga, Latvia.

Contents

12th–14th centuriesEdit

16th centuryEdit

17th centuryEdit

18th centuryEdit

19th centuryEdit

20th centuryEdit

21st centuryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Britannica 1910.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Latvia". Political Chronology of Europe. Europa Publications. 2001. p. 131. ISBN 978-1-85743-113-1.
  3. ^ "Chronology of Catholic Dioceses: Latvia". Norway: Roman Catholic Diocese of Oslo. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Baedeker 1914.
  5. ^ a b "History of Riga: Riga Town Council", Riga.lv, Riga Municipality, retrieved 30 September 2015
  6. ^ a b c d e Webster's Geographical Dictionary, USA: G. & C. Merriam Co., 1960, OCLC 3832886
  7. ^ Patrick Robertson (2011). Robertson's Book of Firsts. Bloomsbury. ISBN 978-1-60819-738-5.
  8. ^ "Leading Libraries of the World: Russia and Finland". American Library Annual. New York: R.R. Bowker Co. 1916. pp. 477–478.
  9. ^ Wayne A. Wiegand; Donald G. Davis, Jr., eds. (1994). "Former Soviet Republics: the Baltic Republics: Latvia". Encyclopedia of Library History. p. 205.
  10. ^ a b Arthur Berthold (1935). "Niclas Mollyn, First Printer of Riga, 1588–1625". The Library Quarterly. 5. JSTOR 4302191.
  11. ^ a b c d e f Latvian National Museum of Art. "History". Retrieved 19 November 2012.
  12. ^ Dziļleja K. Rīga - teātru pilsēta. / Rīga kā Latvijas galvaspilsēta. - Rīgas pilsētas valdes izdevums: Rīga, 1932.
  13. ^ Townsend 1877.
  14. ^ Janis Kirsis (1991). "The Homeopathic Drugstore of Riga". Pharmacy in History. American Institute of the History of Pharmacy. 33. JSTOR 41111378.
  15. ^ a b c d e Hamm 1980.
  16. ^ Murray 1868.
  17. ^ "History of the Museum". National History Museum of Latvia. Retrieved 19 November 2012.
  18. ^ "Russia". Statesman's Year-Book. London: Macmillan and Co. 1885.
  19. ^ Rīgas Centrālās bibliotēkas vēsture (in Latvian), Rīgas Centrālā bibliotēka, retrieved 30 September 2015 (includes chronology)
  20. ^ Vernon N. Kisling, ed. (2000). "Zoological Gardens of Western Europe: Russia and former Soviet Union (chronological list)". Zoo and Aquarium History. USA: CRC Press. p. 375+. ISBN 978-1-4200-3924-5.
  21. ^ "Latvia". Statesman's Year-Book. London: Macmillan and Co. 1921 – via HathiTrust.
  22. ^ Stephen Pope; Elizabeth-Anne Wheal (1995). "Select Chronology". Dictionary of the First World War. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-85052-979-1.
  23. ^ a b c "Latvia Profile: Timeline", BBC News, retrieved 30 September 2015
  24. ^ "In Riga, Creating an Identity Through the Arts". New York Times. 16 July 2007.
  25. ^ "Garden Search: Latvia". London: Botanic Gardens Conservation International. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  26. ^ "Riga". Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe. New York: Yivo Institute for Jewish Research. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  27. ^ a b c d e "Latvia". Europa World Year Book. Europa Publications. 2004. p. 2590+. ISBN 978-1-85743-255-8.
  28. ^ "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1965. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations. 1966.
  29. ^ Henry W. Morton; Robert C. Stuart, eds. (1984). The Contemporary Soviet City. New York: M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 978-0-87332-248-5.
  30. ^ United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1987). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1985 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 247–289.
  31. ^ Walter Rüegg, ed. (2011). "Universities founded in Europe between 1945 and 1995". Universities Since 1945. History of the University in Europe. 4. Cambridge University Press. pp. 575–594. ISBN 978-1-139-49425-0.
  32. ^ a b c "Organizations". International Relations and Security Network. Switzerland: Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich. Retrieved 30 September 2015.
  33. ^ "Movie Theaters in Riga, Latvia". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved 27 July 2013.
  34. ^ "Population of Capital Cities and Cities of 100,000 or More Inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2011. United Nations Statistics Division. 2012.

This article incorporates information from the Latvian Wikipedia, Polish Wikipedia, and Russian Wikipedia.

BibliographyEdit

Published in 17th-19th centuries
Published in 20th century

External linksEdit