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Timeline of Lynn, Massachusetts

The following is a timeline of the history of Lynn, Massachusetts, USA.

17th-18th centuryEdit

  • 1629 - Saugus founded. Among the founders—Edmund Ingalls
  • 1637 - Saugus renamed "Lynn."[1]
  • 1642 - Saugus Iron Works in business.
  • 1644 - Reading separates from Lynn.[1]
  • 1720 - Lynnfield burying-ground established.[2]
  • 1732 - Saugus burying-ground established.[2]
  • 1782 - Lynnfield separates from Lynn.[1]
  • 1793 - Post office in operation.[2]
  • 1797 - Population: 2,291.[3]

19th centuryEdit

  • 1803 - Floating Bridge constructed on Salem-Boston turnpike.[2]
  • 1810 - Population: 4,087.[4]
  • 1812 - Eastern Burial-Place established.[2]
  • 1814 - Town House built.[5]
  • 1815
 
Lyceum building
 
Ezra W. Mudge
 
Music Hall
 
St. Stephen's Memorial Episcopal Church
 
G.A.R. Hall and Museum
 
Emblem of Lynn Historical Society, 1898

20th centuryEdit

 
Vamp Building
 
Walter H. Creamer
 
Lynn Post Office
 
Capitol Diner
 
Lynn City Hall

21st centuryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Britannica 1910.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i Arrington 1922.
  3. ^ Morse 1797.
  4. ^ a b Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, U.S. Census Bureau, 1998
  5. ^ a b c d e Industries of Massachusetts 1886.
  6. ^ a b Davies Project. "American Libraries before 1876". Princeton University. Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  7. ^ a b c d e "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  8. ^ "Lynn Natural History Society". Magazine of Horticuture. Boston, Mass.: Hovey & Co. October 1843.
  9. ^ a b c Newhall 1890.
  10. ^ "Frederick Douglass Chronology". Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. U.S. National Park Service. Retrieved May 30, 2015.
  11. ^   The full text of Page:My Bondage and My Freedom (1855).djvu/411 at Wikisource
  12. ^ a b "Frederick Douglass Chronology - Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service)". www.nps.gov. Retrieved 2018-06-01.
  13. ^ "Transportation Protests: 1841 to 1992". www.civilrightsteaching.org. Retrieved 2018-06-01.
  14. ^ "Resistance to the Segregation of Public Transportation in the Early 1840's". primaryresearch.org. Retrieved 2018-06-01.
  15. ^ "High Rock Park". City of Lynn. Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  16. ^ Carlson, Stephen P. (1980). All Aboard!. Saugus, Massachusetts: Stephen P. Carlson.
  17. ^ a b Bradlee, Francis F. C. (1917). The Eastern Railroad: A Historical Account of Early Railroading in Eastern New England. Salem, MA: The Essex Institute.
  18. ^ Lynn Public Library. "About our library". Archived from the original on October 4, 2006. Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  19. ^ Johnson 1880.
  20. ^ Fraser, Caroline (1999). God's Perfect Child: Living and Dying in the Christian Science Church. Henry Holt and Company. p. 52. ISBN 978-0805044317.
  21. ^ Nichols 1869.
  22. ^ Aaron Brenner; Benjamin Day; Immanuel Ness, eds. (2015) [2009]. "Timeline". Encyclopedia of Strikes in American History. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-317-45707-7.
  23. ^ Anniversary 1880.
  24. ^ "Lynn Woods Reservation". City of Lynn. Retrieved October 1, 2012.
  25. ^ W.H. Michael (1889). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fiftieth Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  26. ^ March 11, 1888, Blizzard Shuts Down Massachusetts, Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities
  27. ^ The Thomson-Houston Road at Lynn, Mass., The Electrical World, Dec. 8, 1888, page 303
  28. ^ Electric Railway at Lynn, Mass., Electric Power, January, 1889, page 21
  29. ^ "FAQs: How did the firm impact the advent of electricity?". J.P. Morgan. Retrieved 3 February 2013.
  30. ^ a b c Belcher, Jonathan (31 December 2011). "Changes to Transit Service in the MBTA district" (PDF). NETransit. Retrieved 13 March 2012.
  31. ^ "High Rock Park, Tower and Observatory". City of Lynn. Retrieved 2017-06-14.
  32. ^ "The Roads Not Taken". www.architects.org. Retrieved 2017-06-14.
  33. ^ "Interstate 95-Massachusetts (North of Boston Section)". www.bostonroads.com. Retrieved 2017-06-14.
  34. ^ "BLAZE DESTROYS URBAN COMPLEX IN LYNN, MASS". New York Times. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  35. ^ "City of Lynn, Massachusetts Official Homepage". Archived from the original on July 2001 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  36. ^ "Frederick Douglass' 200th Birthday in Lynn" (PDF). Lynn Douglass 200th Committee. Retrieved 2018-06-01.
  37. ^ "Re-Examining Fredrick Douglass's Time In Lynn". Lynn Daily Item / itemlive.com. Retrieved 2018-06-01.
  38. ^ Federal Writers' Project (1937), "Chronology", Massachusetts: a Guide to its Places and People, American Guide Series, Boston: Houghton Mifflin

BibliographyEdit

Published in the 18th-19th century
Published in the 20th century

External linksEdit