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Timeline of Birmingham, Alabama

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Birmingham, Alabama, USA.

19th centuryEdit

20th centuryEdit

1900s-1950sEdit

1960s-1990sEdit

21st centuryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 221, OL 6112221M
  2. ^ a b c d Owen 1921.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Browse Collections". Digital Collections. Birmingham Public Library. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  4. ^ a b c Federal Writers' Project 1941: "Birmingham"
  5. ^ a b c d e "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  6. ^ Teeple 1887.
  7. ^ Barbara Brandon Schnorrenberg (2002), ""The Best School for Blacks in the State" St. Mark's Academic and Industrial School, Birmingham, Alabama 1892-1940", Anglican and Episcopal History, 71 (4): 519–549, JSTOR 42615917
  8. ^ "St. Mark's School, Birmingham, Alabama", Colored American Magazine, New York: Moore Publishing, 13, 1907
  9. ^ a b "Encyclopedia of Alabama". Alabama Humanities Foundation. Retrieved March 26, 2017.
  10. ^ a b Patterson's American Educational Directory. 19. Chicago. 1922.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, US Census Bureau, 1998
  12. ^ a b c Lynda Brown; et al. (1998). "Chronology". Alabama History: An Annotated Bibliography. Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0-313-28223-2.
  13. ^ Negro Education: A Study of the Private and Higher Schools for Colored People in the United States. U.S. Government Printing Office. 1917.
  14. ^ a b c d e Brownell 1972.
  15. ^ "Archives & Manuscripts - Guide to the Collections". Birmingham Public Library. Retrieved March 2, 2017.
  16. ^ a b Jack Alicoate, ed. (1939), "Alabama", Radio Annual, New York: Radio Daily, OCLC 2459636
  17. ^ "Institution Directory". Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. Archived from the original on May 10, 2000. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  18. ^ Ingalls 1981.
  19. ^ Draper 1996.
  20. ^ Norrell 1986.
  21. ^ a b c American Association for State and Local History 2002.
  22. ^ Charles A. Alicoate, ed. (1960), "Television Stations: Alabama", Radio Annual and Television Year Book, New York: Radio Daily Corp., OCLC 10512206
  23. ^ Vernon N. Kisling, Jr., ed. (2001). "Zoological Gardens of the United States (chronological list)". Zoo and Aquarium History. USA: CRC Press. ISBN 978-1-4200-3924-5.
  24. ^ a b Scott Thumma (ed.). "Database of Megachurches in the U.S." Connecticut: Hartford Seminary. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  25. ^ "Events", Civil Rights Digital Library, Athens, GA: Digital Library of Georgia (Timeline)
  26. ^ "On This Day", New York Times, retrieved November 1, 2014
  27. ^ a b "Movie Theaters in Birmingham, AL". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  28. ^ "Birmingham, Alabama: A city using theatres to reinvent itself", BBC News, April 12, 2019
  29. ^ "About". Birmingham: Community Food Bank of Central Alabama. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  30. ^ "Alabama Food Banks". Food Bank Locator. Chicago: Feeding America. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Birmingham Sister City Anniversary Dates". Birmingham Sister Cities. Archived from the original on March 2, 2017.
  32. ^ "History". Hoover, Alabama: Birmingham Islamic Society. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  33. ^ Pluralism Project. "Birmingham, Alabama". Directory of Religious Centers. Harvard University. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  34. ^ "Alabama". Official Congressional Directory. 1993 – via Hathi Trust.
  35. ^ "City of Birmingham, Alabama". Archived from the original on October 1996 – via Internet Archive, Wayback Machine.
  36. ^ "Alabama". CJR's Guide to Online News Startups. New York: Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  37. ^ "Organization Directory". Birmingham365.org. Create Birmingham. Retrieved April 3, 2017.
  38. ^ "Birmingham (city), Alabama". State & County QuickFacts. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 22, 2014.
  39. ^ "Alabama". Official Congressional Directory. 2011.
  40. ^ "When a State Balks at a City's Minimum Wage", New York Times, February 21, 2016
  41. ^ Federal Writers' Project (1941), "Chronology", Alabama; a Guide to the Deep South, American Guide Series, New York: Hastings House – via Hathi Trust

BibliographyEdit

Published in 19th centuryEdit

Published in 20th centuryEdit

  • Code of City of Birmingham, Alabama. 1917.
  • "Birmingham". Automobile Blue Book. USA. 1919.
  • Cruikshank, A History of Birmingham and Its Environs (2 vols., Chicago, 1920)
  • Thomas McAdory Owen (1921), "Birmingham", History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, Chicago: S.J. Clarke, OCLC 1872130
  • Harrison A. Trexler, "Birmingham's Struggle with Commission Government," National Municipal Review, XIV (November 1925)
  • George R. Leighton, "Birmingham, Alabama: The City of Perpetual Promise," Harper's Magazine, CLXXV (August 1937)
  • Federal Writers' Project (1941), "Birmingham", Alabama; a Guide to the Deep South, American Guide Series, New York: Hastings House
  • Florence H. W. Moss, Building Birmingham and Jefferson County (Birmingham, Ala.: Birmingham Printing Company, 1947)
  • John C. Henley, Jr., This Is Birmingham: The Story of the Founding and Growth of an American City. 1960.
  • Paul B. Worthman, "Black Workers and Labor Unions in Birmingham, Alabama, 1897-1904," Labor History, 10 (Summer 1969)
  • Paul B. Worthman, "Working Class Mobility in Birmingham, Alabama, 1880-1914," in Anonymous Americans: Explorations in Nineteenth-Century Social History, ed. Tamara K. Hareven (Englewood Cliffs, 1971)
  • Blaine A. Brownell (1972), "Birmingham, Alabama: New South City in the 1920s", Journal of Southern History, 38 (1): 21–48, doi:10.2307/2206652, JSTOR 2206652
  • McMillan, Malcolm C. Yesterday's Birmingham. Miami: E.A. Seeman Publishing, 1975.
  • Ory Mazar Nergal, ed. (1980), "Birmingham, AL", Encyclopedia of American Cities, New York: E.P. Dutton, OL 4120668M
  • Robert P. Ingalls (1981), "Antiradical Violence in Birmingham During the 1930s", Journal of Southern History, 47 (4): 521–544, doi:10.2307/2207401, JSTOR 2207401
  • Valley and the Hills: An Illustrated History of Birmingham and Jefferson County. 1981
  • Robert J. Norrell (1986), "Caste in Steel: Jim Crow Careers in Birmingham, Alabama", Journal of American History, 73 (3): 669–694, doi:10.2307/1902982, JSTOR 1902982
  • Old Birmingham, OCLC 38508791 1991-
  • George Thomas Kurian (1994), "Birmingham, Alabama", World Encyclopedia of Cities, 1: North America, Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO, ISBN 9780874366495-9780874366501-9780874366518 Check |isbn= value: length (help) – via Open Library
  • Henry M. McKiven (1995). Iron and Steel: Class, Race, and Community in Birmingham, Alabama, 1875-1920. Univ of North Carolina Press. ISBN 978-0-8078-4524-0.
  • Alan Draper (1996), "New Southern Labor History Revisited: The Success of the Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers Union in Birmingham, 1934-1938", Journal of Southern History, 62 (1): 87–108, doi:10.2307/2211207, JSTOR 2211207
  • "The South: Alabama: Birmingham", USA, Let's Go, New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999, OL 24937240M
  • Lynne B. Feldman, A Sense of Place: Birmingham's Black Middle Class Community, 1890-1930 (Tuscaloosa, 1999)

Published in 21st centuryEdit

External linksEdit

ImagesEdit