Tim Sweeney (ice hockey)

Timothy Paul Sweeney (born April 12, 1967) is an American former professional ice hockey player who played in the National Hockey League from 1990 to 1998 with the Calgary Flames, Boston Bruins, Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, and New York Rangers. He was born in Boston, but grew up in Weymouth, Massachusetts. Sweeney played for Boston College from 1985–89, and then made his professional debut in 1989, and aside from playing in the NHL played in the minor leagues. Internationally Sweeney played for the American national team at the 1992 Winter Olympics and 1994 World Championship.

Tim Sweeney
Born (1967-04-12) April 12, 1967 (age 53)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Calgary Flames
Boston Bruins
Mighty Ducks of Anaheim
New York Rangers
National team  United States
NHL Draft 122nd overall, 1985
Calgary Flames
Playing career 1989–1999

Playing careerEdit

He was selected 122nd overall in the 1985 NHL Entry Draft by the Calgary Flames.

After college, Sweeney played for the Salt Lake Golden Eagles of the IHL, and then in the NHL for the Calgary Flames, the Boston Bruins, the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim and the New York Rangers. Sweeney left his legacy on the NHL by being recognized as the only player to play for only these four clubs during his career. His last professional season was 1998–99, for the Providence Bruins of the AHL.

In his first year after college, the 1989–90 season, he won the International Hockey League's Ken McKenzie Trophy for Rookie of the Year. Sweeney represented the United States at the 1992 Winter Olympics.[1]

Post retirementEdit

After retiring from hockey, Sweeney worked as a color commentator for Boston College and Hockey East games.[2][3]

Personal lifeEdit

Sweeney is married to Chrissy (Roche) Sweeney. Together they have three children, Lily, Emily, and Timothy Sweeney.[4]

Career statisticsEdit

Regular season and playoffsEdit

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1983–84 Weymouth High School HS-MA 23 33 26 59
1984–85 Weymouth High School HS-MA 22 32 56 88
1985–86 Boston College HE 32 8 4 12 8
1986–87 Boston College HE 38 31 16 49 28
1987–88 Boston College HE 18 9 11 20 18
1988–89 Boston College HE 39 29 44 73 26
1989–90 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 81 46 51 97 32 11 5 4 9 4
1990–91 Calgary Flames NHL 42 7 9 16 8
1990–91 Salt Lake Golden Eagles IHL 31 19 16 35 8 4 3 3 6 0
1991–92 Calgary Flames NHL 11 1 2 3 4
1991–92 United States National Team Intl 21 9 11 20 10
1992–93 Boston Bruins NHL 14 1 7 8 6 3 0 0 0 0
1992–93 Providence Bruins AHL 60 41 55 96 32 3 2 2 4 0
1993–94 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 78 16 27 43 49
1994–95 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 13 1 1 2 2
1994–95 Providence Bruins AHL 2 2 2 4 0 13 8 17 25 6
1995–96 Boston Bruins NHL 41 8 8 16 14 1 0 0 0 2
1995–96 Providence Bruins AHL 34 17 22 39 12
1996–97 Boston Bruins NHL 36 10 11 21 14
1996–97 Providence Bruins AHL 23 11 22 33 6
1997–98 New York Rangers NHL 56 11 18 29 26
1997–98 Hartford Wolf Pack AHL 7 2 6 8 8
1998–99 Providence Bruins AHL 2 0 0 0 0
NHL totals 291 55 83 138 123 4 0 0 0 2

InternationalEdit

Year Team Event GP G A Pts PIM
1992 United States OLY 8 3 4 7 6
1994 United States WC 8 3 2 5 0
Senior totals 16 6 6 12 6

Awards and honorsEdit

Award Year
All-Hockey East First Team 1988–89 [5]
AHCA East Second-Team All-American 1988–89 [6]
Hockey East All-Tournament Team 1989 [7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Loftus, Marcus (March 22, 2018). "Hanover's Timmy Sweeney outdoes his dad with Frozen Four appearance". Hanover Mariner. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  2. ^ "Former NHL Star And Boston College Alumnus Adds Color To Hockey East". amcnetworks.com. January 4, 2001. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  3. ^ "South Shore athletes have found Olympic glory". Hanover Mariner. February 23, 2010. Retrieved June 30, 2018.
  4. ^ "Ducks Will Welcome Back Players from Original Team at Sunday's Throwback Night". NHL.com. October 9, 2013. Retrieved June 29, 2018.
  5. ^ "Hockey East All-Teams". College Hockey Historical Archives. Retrieved May 19, 2013.
  6. ^ "Men's Ice Hockey Award Winners" (PDF). NCAA.org. Retrieved June 11, 2013.
  7. ^ "2013-14 Hockey East Media Guide". Hockey East. Retrieved 2014-05-19.

External linksEdit

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Dave Capuano
Hockey East Scoring Champion
1988–89
Succeeded by
David Emma