The Tiflis uezd[a] was a county (uezd) of the Tiflis Governorate of the Caucasus Viceroyalty of the Russian Empire, and then of Democratic Republic of Georgia, with its administrative center in Tiflis (present-day Tbilisi).[1] The area of the uezd roughly corresponded to the contemporary Kvemo Kartli region of Georgia. The district bordered the Telavi uezd to the northeast, the Tionety and Dusheti uezds to the north, the Gori uezd to the northwest, the Borchaly uezd to the west, the Kazakh uezd of the Elizavetpol Governorate to the south, and the Signakh uezd to the east.

Tiflis uezd
Тифлисскій уѣздъ
Coat of arms of Tiflis uezd
Location in the Tiflis Governorate
Location in the Tiflis Governorate
CountryRussian Empire
ViceroyaltyCaucasus
GovernorateTiflis
Established1804
Abolished1930
CapitalTiflis
(present-day Tbilisi)
Area
 • Total4,556.89 km2 (1,759.43 sq mi)
Population
 (1916)
 • Total521,222
 • Density110/km2 (300/sq mi)
 • Urban
66.53%
 • Rural
33.47%

HistoryEdit

The Tiflis uezd as part of the Georgia Governorate was formed in 1801 as a result of the annexation of the Kingdom of Kartli-Kakhetian to the Russian Empire. In 1840, the district formed a part of the Georgia-Imeretia Governorate, then after 1846 it was included in the Tiflis Governorate until its abolition by Soviet authorities. In 1880, the Borchaly uezd was detached from the Tiflis uezd to be administered separately.[1]

Following the Russian Revolution, the Tiflis uezd was incorporated into the short-lived Democratic Republic of Georgia.[2]

Administrative divisionsEdit

The subcounties (uchastoks) of the Tiflis uezd were as follows:[3]

Uchastok Russian name 1912 population Area
Karayazsky Караязскій участокъ 7,724 1,426.51 square versts (1,623.46 km2; 626.82 sq mi)
Sartachalsky Сартачальскій участокъ 31,905 1,073.92 square versts (1,222.19 km2; 471.89 sq mi)
Tiflissky Тифлисскій участокъ 33,313 1,503.65 square versts (1,711.25 km2; 660.72 sq mi)
Prigorodny Пригородный раіонъ 12,168

DemographicsEdit

Russian Empire census (1897)Edit

According to the Russian Empire Census of 1897, the Tiflis uezd had a population of 234,632, including 137,849 men and 96,783 women. The plurality of the population indicated Georgian to be their mother tongue, with significant Armenian, Russian, and Tatar (later known as Azerbaijani) speaking minorities.[4]

Linguistic composition of the Tiflis uezd in 1897[4]
Language Native speakers %
Georgian 80,293 34.22
Armenian 57,933 24.69
Russian 51,775 22.07
Tatar[b] 13,764 5.87
German 5,417 2.31
Polish 4,918 2.10
Greek 4,554 1.94
Ukrainian 3,450 1.47
Jewish 3,336 1.42
Persian 1,766 0.75
Ossetian 1,712 0.73
Assyrian 1,354 0.58
Imeretian 1,005 0.43
Lithuanian 828 0.35
French 342 0.15
Kurdish 220 0.09
Czech 191 0.08
Mingrelian 191 0.08
Romanian 175 0.07
Italian 150 0.06
Belarusian 148 0.06
Chuvash 141 0.06
Avar-Andean 124 0.05
Latvian 96 0.04
Turkish 71 0.03
Dargin 59 0.03
Chechen 52 0.02
Kazi-Kumukh 47 0.02
Kyurin 43 0.02
Kist 9 0.00
Other 468 0.20
TOTAL 234,632 100.00

Caucasian Calendar (1917)Edit

According to the 1917 publication of the Caucasian Calendar, the Tiflis uezd had 521,222 residents in 1916, including 283,326 men and 236,896 women, 339,668 of whom were the permanent population, and 181,554 were temporary residents:[5]

Nationality Urban Rural TOTAL
Number % Number % Number %
Armenians 149,294 43.05 26,044 14.93 175,338 33.64
Georgians 37,584 10.84 96,040 55.05 133,624 25.64
Russians[c] 91,997 26.53 29,042 16.65 121,039 23.22
Other Europeans 11,883 3.43 9,075 5.20 20,958 4.02
Asiatic Christians 19,560 5.64 35 0.02 19,595 3.76
Shia Muslims[d] 9,408 2.71 8,186 4.69 17,594 3.38
Jews 10,712 3.09 306 0.18 11,018 2.11
Sunni Muslims[e] 6,273 1.81 3,842 2.20 10,115 1.94
Yazidis 4,697 1.35 0 0.00 4,697 0.90
North Caucasians 2,685 0.77 938 0.54 3,623 0.70
Kurds 2,279 0.66 948 0.54 3,227 0.62
Roma 394 0.11 0 0.00 394 0.08
TOTAL 346,766 100.00 174,456 100.00 521,222 100.00

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^
  2. ^ Later known as Azerbaijani.
  3. ^ The Caucasian Calendar did not distinguish between Russians, Ukrainians, and Belarusians.
  4. ^ Primarily Tatars,[6] later known as Azerbaijanis.[7]
  5. ^ Primarily Turco-Tatars.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopaedia: Tiflis Governorate (in Russian)
  2. ^ Tsutsiev, Arthur (2014), Atlas of the Ethno-Political History of the Caucasus, New Haven and London, p. 63, ISBN 978-0-300-15308-8, OCLC 884858065, retrieved 2021-12-25
  3. ^ Кавказский календарь на 1913 год [Caucasian calendar for 1913] (in Russian) (68th ed.). Tiflis: Tipografiya kantselyarii Ye.I.V. na Kavkaze, kazenny dom. 1913. pp. 164–175. Archived from the original on 19 April 2022.
  4. ^ a b "Демоскоп Weekly - Приложение. Справочник статистических показателей". www.demoscope.ru. Retrieved 2022-06-30.
  5. ^ Кавказский календарь на 1917 год [Caucasian calendar for 1917] (in Russian) (72nd ed.). Tiflis: Tipografiya kantselyarii Ye.I.V. na Kavkaze, kazenny dom. 1917. pp. 206–213. Archived from the original on 4 November 2021.
  6. ^ a b Hovannisian 1971, p. 67.
  7. ^ Bournoutian 2015, p. 35.

BibliographyEdit

  • Bournoutian, George (2015). "Demographic Changes in the Southwest Caucasus, 1604–1830: The Case of Historical Eastern Armenia". Forum of EthnoGeoPolitics. Amsterdam. 3 (2).
  • Hovannisian, Richard G. (1971). The Republic of Armenia. Vol. 1. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-01805-2.

Coordinates: 41°43′21″N 44°47′33″E / 41.72250°N 44.79250°E / 41.72250; 44.79250