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Thomas Pitt, 1st Earl of Londonderry

Thomas Innes Pitt, 1st Earl of Londonderry (c. 1688 – 12 September 1729) was a British Army officer and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1713 to 1728. He served as Governor of the Leeward Islands from 1728 to 1729.

Pitt was the second son of Thomas Pitt, of Boconnoc, and his wife Jane Innes, daughter of James Innes. William Pitt the Elder was his nephew and William Pitt the Younger his great-nephew. He attended Mr Meure’s academy at Soho Square from 1703 to 1706. In 1708 he joined the army and was ensign in the 9th Foot until April 1709. He was then a captain in Killigrew’s dragoons until February 1715.[1]

Pitt was returned as a Whig Member of Parliament for Wilton on his father's interest at the 1713 British general election. He voted against the expulsion of Richard Steele. At the 1715 British general election, he was returned again for Wilton and voted regularly with the Administration.. He became Colonel of the Princess of Wales's Own Regiment of Horse in 1715 and served in the Jacobite rebellion. He was said to have lost over £50,000 in the South Sea bubble. He was returned again for Wilton at the 1722 British general election. He became Colonel of Prince George of Denmark's Regiment in 1726. At the 1727 British general election he was returned as MP for Old Sarum. In 1728, he was appointed Governor of the Leeward Islands, and vacated his seat in the House of Commons [2]

Pitt died in the Leeward Islands after a year's service on 12 September 1729. He had married Lady Frances Ridgeway, daughter of Robert Ridgeway, 4th Earl of Londonderry, on 10 March 1717. They had two sons and one daughter. The earldom of Londonderry held by his father-in-law had become extinct on the latter's death in 1714. In 1719 the Londonderry title was revived for Pitt who was created Baron Londonderry in the Peerage of Ireland. Seven years later the earldom was also revived when he was created Viscount Gallen-Ridgeway and Earl of Londonderry, again in the Peerage of Ireland. Lord Londonderry died on 12 September 1729, and was succeeded in his peerages by his eldest son Thomas Pitt.

ReferencesEdit

  • Lee, Sidney, ed. (1896). "Pitt, Thomas (1688?-1729)" . Dictionary of National Biography. 45. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  1. ^ "PITT, Thomas II (c.1688-1729), of Hanover Square, Mdx. and Pall Mall". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715. Retrieved 27 April 2019.
  2. ^ "PITT, Thomas (c.1688-1729), of Pall Mall, London". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 27 April 2019.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Charles Mompesson
Peter Bathurst
Member of Parliament for Wilton
17131727
With: John London 1713–1722
Robert Sawyer Herbert 1722–1727
Succeeded by
Robert Sawyer Herbert
Thomas Martin
Preceded by
John Pitt
George Pitt
Member of Parliament for Old Sarum
1727–1728
With: Thomas Pitt 1727–1728
Matthew St Quintin 1728
Succeeded by
Matthew St Quintin
Thomas Harrison
Military offices
Preceded by
John Bland
Colonel of The Princess of Wales's Own Regiment of Horse
1715–1726
Succeeded by
The Duke of Argyll
Preceded by
Sir Charles Wills
Colonel of Prince George of Denmark's Regiment
1726–1729
Succeeded by
William Tatton
Political offices
Preceded by
John Hart
Governor of the Leeward Islands
1728–1729
Succeeded by
William Cosby
(acting)
Peerage of Ireland
New creation Earl of Londonderry
1726–1729
Succeeded by
Thomas Pitt
Baron Londonderry
1719–1729