Open main menu

Thomas Icely (3 November 1797 – 13 February 1874) was an early colonial New South Wales landholder and stockbreeder.[1] As a nominee Legislative Councillor from 1843,[2] to 1853,[3] and from 1855,[4] until the establishment of responsible government in 1856,[5] he was a consistent supporter of the Governor.[6] He served a second term as a life appointee to the Legislative Council from 1864.[7]

Thomas Icely

Thomas Icely 1874.jpg
Portrait of Thomas Icely published with his obituary in Australian Town and Country Journal (New South Wales), 28 February 1874
Born(1797-11-03)3 November 1797
Plympton, Devonshire, England
Died13 February 1874(1874-02-13) (aged 76)
Parramatta, New South Wales
ResidenceCoombing Park, New South Wales
Elizabeth Farm, Parramatta

Icely was the beneficiary of large land grants to which he added purchased land holdings, his main holding from 1831 was Coombing Park.[8] To support this holding, the village of Mandurama was established in 1876.[9]

His name is associated with the introduction of Shorthorn stock into Australia.[8][10]

He was the first lessee of Elizabeth Farm to which he retired with his family in 1869 and where he died on 13 February 1874.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Mr Thomas Icely". Former Members of the Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  2. ^ "Proclamation: appointed members of the Legislative Council". New South Wales Government Gazette (62). 25 July 1843. p. 952. Retrieved 23 April 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "Proclamation: appointment of Thomas Barker". New South Wales Government Gazette (38). 8 April 1853. p. 655. Retrieved 5 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "Proclamation: appointment Thomas Icely". New South Wales Government Gazette (63). 27 April 1855. p. 1207. Retrieved 5 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "Appointed Prior to the Date of Responsible Government in 1856" (PDF). New South Wales Parliamentary Record: Part Three – Members of the Legislative Council. Parliament of New South Wales. Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 April 2019.
  6. ^ "Who represents the colony?". The Empire. 10 December 1853. p. 4. Retrieved 5 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "Legislative council appointments". New South Wales Government Gazette (115). New South Wales, Australia. 3 June 1864. p. 1315. Retrieved 5 May 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ a b Cable, K J. "Icely, Thomas (1797–1874)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  9. ^ "Carcoar". SMH.com.au. 8 February 2004. Retrieved 5 May 2019.
  10. ^ "Tracing the Breed's History". Beef Shorthorn Society of Australia. Archived from the original on 20 February 2011.
  11. ^ "Guidebook, Elizabeth Farm", Historic Houses Trust (New South Wales) accessed 22 September 2011.