Thomas Bostock Whinney

Midland Bank, Stow Hill/Tredegar Place, Newport 1896–97
Midland Bank, The Cross, Gloucester 1905–07
London City and Midland Bank, Long Row, Nottingham 1911
Midland Bank, Cirencester 1915–16

Thomas Bostock Whinney (1860 – 7 May 1926) FRIBA was an English architect based in London who became the chief architect of the Midland Bank.

HistoryEdit

He was born in 1860, the son of Frederick Whinney of Regent's Park Road, London. He was educated at Charterhouse School.[1]

He was appointed Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, and had his offices at 8 Old Jewry, London. Later he was in partnership as Whinney, Son and Austen Hall

He married Sydney Margaret Dickens, daughter of Charles Dickens, Jr., on 30 July 1895 at St Andrew's Church, Fulham. Their children were:

  • Margaret Dickens Whinney (1897–1974) who wrote books on British sculpture and architecture.[2]
  • Humphrey Charles Dickens Whinney (1899–1982)
  • Philip Charles Dickens Whinney (1901–1959)

He died on 7 May 1926 and left an estate of £65,107 10s. 1d. (equivalent to £3,806,800 in 2019).[3]

WorksEdit

  • Midland Bank, Stow Hill/Tredegar Place, Newport, South Wales 1896–97[4]
  • Midland Bank, High Street/Albion Place, Southampton 1900[5]
  • Midland Bank, North Street, Brighton 1902
  • Midland Bank, London Street, Norwich 1902–03[6]
  • Midland Bank, Western Road, Brighton 1905[7]
  • London City and Midland Bank, The Cross, Gloucester 1905–07[8]
  • Midland Bank, Wallgate, Wigan 1910[9] alteration
  • Midland Bank, Cornfield Road/Terminus Road, Eastbourne 1910–11[10]
  • London, City and Midland Bank, 15–16 Long Row, Nottingham 1911.
  • Midland Bank, Bath Street/Longden Street, Sneinton, Nottingham 1911.
  • Midland Bank, Linthorpe Road, Middlesbrough 1912[11]
  • London City and Midland Bank, High Street, Oakham[12]
  • Midland Bank, 2 Market Place, Cirencester 1915–16[13]
  • War memorial, London City and Midland Bank, Threadneedle Street, London 1921[14]
  • Midland Bank, Golders Green Road, Golders Green, London 1921[15]
  • Bank extension, 6 Victoria Street, Nottingham 1920–21 (two right hand bays)
  • Midland Bank, 49 and 51, Corn Street, Bristol 1922[16]
  • Midland Bank, Henley on Thames, 1924

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Parish, W.D. (1879). List of Carthusians, 1800 to 1879. Google Books: Farncombe and Co.
  2. ^ "Whinney, Margaret [Dickens]". The Dictionary of Art Historians. Archived from the original on 21 February 2012. Retrieved 7 April 2013.
  3. ^ UK Retail Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  4. ^ "The new Midland Bank at Newport". South Wales Echo. Wales. 6 June 1896. Retrieved 2 April 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  5. ^ Historic England, "Midland Bank Limited (1092018)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 April 2017
  6. ^ "New Bank for Norwich". Norfolk Chronicle. England. 4 April 1903. Retrieved 2 April 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ Historic England, "Midland Bank (1381099)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 April 2017
  8. ^ "London City and Midland Bank". Gloucester Journal. England. 4 November 1905. Retrieved 2 April 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. ^ Historic England, "Midland Bank (1384481)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 April 2017
  10. ^ "Another Bank in Terminus Road!". Eastbourne Gazette. England. 3 August 1910. Retrieved 2 April 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. ^ Historic England, "Midland Bank (1139852)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 April 2017
  12. ^ "London City and Midland Bank. New premises at Oakham". Grantham Journal. England. 20 June 1914. Retrieved 2 April 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  13. ^ Historic England, "Midland Bank and attached railings (1187494)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 April 2017
  14. ^ "Bank Memorial". Western Daily Press. England. 12 November 1921. Retrieved 2 April 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  15. ^ "A Golders Green Bank". Western Daily Press. England. 12 November 1921. Retrieved 2 April 2017 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  16. ^ Historic England, "Midland Bank (1282312)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 April 2017