List of adaptations of The Prince and the Pauper

  (Redirected from The Prince and the Pauper (film))

Mark Twain's 1881 novel The Prince and the Pauper has been adapted for the screen and television a number of times:

FilmEdit

Direct or faithful adaptationsEdit

Loose translations, pastiches, and parodiesEdit

TelevisionEdit

Direct or faithful adaptationsEdit

Rough translations, pastiches, and parodiesEdit

  • "The Prince and the Paupers" (1967), the 21st episode of The Monkees
  • "P.J. and the President's Son" (1976), a modern American-based ABC Afterschool Special with Lance Kerwin playing the dual role
  • "Duel and Duality" (1987), an episode of Blackadder the Third where the Prince Regent believes that the Duke of Wellington is after him. The prince swaps clothes with Blackadder (his butler) and says, "This reminds me of that story 'The Prince and the Porpoise'." Blackadder corrects him: "Pauper. The Prince and the Pauper."
  • "The Pooch and the Pauper" (1996), an episode of Wishbone with Wishbone playing both Tom Canty and Edward VI
  • "Double, Double, Boy in Trouble" (2008), an episode of The Simpsons
  • Jake & Blake (2010), an Argentine television series which started out as a parody of The Prince and the Pauper, but turned to a more serious plotline as the show progressed
  • "Make Play" (2011), an episode of Phineas and Ferb (season 2, episode 64), with Candace switching places with Princess Baldegunde of Duselstein and discovering that royal life is dull
  • "The Princess and the Pickpocket" (2017), an episode of the anime series Princess Principal. The characters Ange and Princess Charlotte have their history revealed by Ange under the guise of a fairy tale. Ten years prior to the start of the series, Ange, who was actually the real Princess Charlotte, met Princess, who was actually a common pickpocket named Ange and looked identical to her. They befriended one another and eventually decided to trade places for a day. Soon after the switch, however, a revolution broke out and divided their country, separating the girls and leaving them trapped in each other's roles.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit