The Myth of Mars and Venus

The Myth of Mars and Venus: Do Men and Women Really Speak Different Languages? is a book by Deborah Cameron that was originally released in the autumn of 2008, which was published by Oxford University Press.[1] The title refers to the central conceit of the book by John Gray of January 1992, Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus, which Cameron’s book is (partially) the response to.[2][3]

The Myth of Mars and Venus:
Do Men and Women Really Speak Different Languages?
The Myth of Mars and Venus.jpg
First Edition (September 2008)
AuthorDeborah Cameron
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
GenreNon Fiction
Relationships
Psychology
Self Help
PublisherOxford University Press
Publication date
11 September 2008
Pages196
ISBN9780199550999

DetailsEdit

Cameron argues that “what linguistic differences there are, between men and women, are driven, by the need to construct and project personal meaning, and identity.” She challenges “the idea that sex differences might have biological rather than social causes” as being more motivated by the reaction to politically correct attitudes than being derived from basic research.

The book argues that there is as much similarity and variation within each gender as there is between men and women. Cameron concludes there is a need to think about gender in more complex ways than the prevailing myths and stereotypes allow.[4]

Further readingEdit

  • Sprecher, Susan; Toro-Morn, Maura (2011), "A study of men and women, from different sides of Earth, to determine, if men are from Mars, and women are from Venus, in their beliefs about love, and romantic relationships", in Kimmel, Michael; Aronson, Amy (eds.), The gendered society reader (4th ed.), New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 559–577, ISBN 9780199733712.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Cameron, Deborah (2008). The myth of Mars and Venus: do men and women really speak different languages?. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199550999.
  2. ^ Cameron, Deborah (2 October 2007). "Speak up, I can't hear you". theguardian.com. Retrieved 30 November 2020.
  3. ^ Poole, Steven (20 October 2007). "Gender agenda". theguardian.com. Retrieved 30 November 2020.
  4. ^ Cameron, Deborah (1 October 2007). "What language barrier?". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 3 July 2017.