The Mystic

The Mystic is a 1925 American MGM silent drama film directed by Tod Browning, who later directed MGM's Freaks (1932). It was co-written by Browning and Waldemar Young, writing a similar storyline to their earlier 1925 hit film The Unholy Three. Browning was unable however to hire his favorite star Lon Chaney this time around, and The Mystic wound up a little-known film with a cast of now-forgotten names.[1] Aileen Pringle's gowns in the film were by already famous Romain de Tirtoff (known as Erté).[2] A print of the film exists.[3]

The Mystic
Poster of the movie The Mystic.jpg
Lobby card
Directed byTod Browning
Produced byLouis B. Mayer
Irving Thalberg
Written byTod Browning
Waldemar Young
StarringAileen Pringle
Conway Tearle
CinematographyIra H. Morgan
Edited byFrank Sullivan
Distributed byMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date
  • September 27, 1925 (1925-09-27)
Running time
70 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageSilent

PlotEdit

Zara (Aileen Pringle) is a gypsy rogue who joins with Confederate Zazarack (Mitchell Lewis) to aid Michael Nash (Conway Tearle), the crooked guardian of heiress Doris Merrick (Gladys Hulette), to gain control of her estate by way of fake seances. He tries to convince her that her dead father is telling her to give all of her worldly possessions to the phony spitualists.

CastEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Workman, Christopher; Howarth, Troy (2016). "Tome of Terror: Horror Films of the Silent Era". Midnight Marquee Press. p.289. ISBN 978-1936168-68-2.
    Eaker, 2016: “Because of the lack of usual Browning stars, The Mystic is an interesting, lesser-known film in the director’s canon. Not only is it thematically related to his other films, but it also shows the idiosyncratic continuity of his taste in actresses and his ability to mold actors, whoever they were.”
  2. ^ "Progressive Silent Film List: The Mystic". Silent Era. Retrieved May 8, 2008.
    Eaker, 2016: “the luxurious costumes for The Mystic were the work of legendary French designer Erté. Erté said it was a thrilling experience to collaborate with such a distinguished surrealist as Tod Browning.”
  3. ^ "The Mystic". American Silent Feature Film Survival Database. Retrieved January 10, 2014.

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