The Loves of Joanna Godden

The Loves of Joanna Godden is a 1947 British historical drama film directed by Charles Frend and produced by Michael Balcon.[2] The screenplay was written by H. E. Bates and Angus MacPhail from the novel Joanna Godden (1921) by Sheila Kaye-Smith.

The Loves of Joanna Godden
Joannagodden.jpg
UK release poster by John Minton[1]
Directed byCharles Frend
Produced byMichael Balcon
Written byH.E. Bates
Angus MacPhail
Based onthe novel Joanna Godden by Sheila Kaye-Smith
StarringGoogie Withers
Jean Kent
John McCallum
Derek Bond
Music byRalph Vaughan Williams
CinematographyDouglas Slocombe
Edited byMichael Truman
Distributed byEaling Studios
Release date
  • 9 June 1947 (1947-06-09)
Running time
89 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

It stars Googie Withers, Jean Kent, John McCallum, Derek Bond, Chips Rafferty and Sonia Holm.[3] Some scenes were shot by director Robert Hamer when Frend was ill, though he was uncredited. The music was composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams.[4]

PlotEdit

In Edwardian Britain, a young woman has three suitors who seek her hand in marriage.

When Joanna Godden's father died, he bequeathed her a farm in Romney Marsh in Kent. Joanna is determined to run the farm herself. Her neighbour Arthur Alce (John McCallum), laughs at her ambitions, but loves her. Choosing a new shepherd, she allows physical attraction to a man to overcome her judgment as a farmer, and her scheme for cross-breeding sheep is unsuccessful. Her wealth gone, she turns to Arthur Alce for help - but not love. That she accepts from Martin Trevor (Derek Bond), a visitor from the world beyond the Marsh. But on the eve of their marriage, Martin dies.[4][5]

CastEdit

and the people of Romney Marsh.

ProductionEdit

The film was based on Joanna Godden, a novel by Sheila Kaye-Smith originally published in 1921.[6][7] The book was popular enough for Kaye-Smith to write a sequel, Joanna Godden Married, published in 1926.[8]

After World War Two, Ealing Studios decided to film the novel, with a screenplay written by H. E. Bates and Angus MacPhail. The film had an ending different from the novel.

The studio cast Googie Withers to star; she had been a hit in Pink String and Sealing Wax. Lead roles were given to Australians John McCallum, who had been put under long-term contract to Rank, and Chips Rafferty, who had just starred in The Overlanders for Ealing.[9]

Filming took place in August and September 1946, with location filming in Kent.[10]

Withers and McCallum fell in love during filming and later married. They named their first child "Joanna" in honour of the film.[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Instant Shop". www.rarefilmposters.com.
  2. ^ "The Loves of Joanna Godden (1947)".
  3. ^ "The Loves of Joanna Godden (1947)".
  4. ^ a b 1948 Daily Mail Film Award Annual
  5. ^ "The Loves of Joanna Godden". The Australian Women's Weekly. 15 (14). Australia, Australia. 13 September 1947. p. 38. Retrieved 17 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "JOANNA GODDEN". The Daily Telegraph (13257). New South Wales, Australia. 5 November 1921. p. 7. Retrieved 17 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "FICTION OF THE DAY". The Argus (Melbourne) (23, 486). Victoria, Australia. 11 November 1921. p. 5. Retrieved 17 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "LITERARY JOTTINGS". The Labor Daily (910). New South Wales, Australia. 1 January 1927. p. 10. Retrieved 17 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ ""Chips" Rafferty to work with Australian". The Australian Women's Weekly. 14 (4). Australia, Australia. 6 July 1946. p. 28. Retrieved 17 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "BRITAIN'S FILM NEWS". The Daily Telegraph. VII (45). New South Wales, Australia. 22 September 1946. p. 41. Retrieved 17 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "JOHN McCALLUM AND GOOGIE WITHERS". The Grenfell Record And Lachlan District Advertiser. 84 (121). New South Wales, Australia. 21 June 1951. p. 6. Retrieved 17 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.

External linksEdit