Lambeth Awards

  (Redirected from The Lambeth Cross for Ecumenism)

The Lambeth Awards are awarded by the Archbishop of Canterbury. In addition to the Lambeth degrees, there are a number of non-academic awards. Before 2016, these awards consisted of the Lambeth Cross, the Canterbury Cross, and the Cross of St Augustine. In 2016, these awards were expanded with six new awards named after previous Archbishops of Canterbury.[1][2]

List of awardsEdit

Archbishop of Canterbury's Award for Outstanding Service to the Anglican CommunionEdit

The Archbishop of Canterbury's Award for Outstanding Service to the Anglican Communion is the highest award within the Anglican Communion. It is a very rare honour and has only been awarded twice.

Cross of St Augustine for Services to the Anglican CommunionEdit

The Cross of St Augustine was created in 1965 by Archbishop Michael Ramsey. It is the second highest award of the Anglican Communion and has three grades - bronze, silver and gold.

Lambeth Cross for EcumenismEdit

The Lambeth Cross for Ecumenism was originally created in 1940. It is awarded "to those who have made an outstanding contribution to ecumenical work in support of the Church of England or to those who have made exceptional contributions to relations between the faiths".[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2004

2016

  • Anba Angaelos, "for his contributions to ecumenical and interfaith engagement and his tireless commitment to peace and reconciliation"[4][5]
  • Gregorios Theocharous, "for his contributions to Church relations, the integration and education of the Greek community in Great Britain and the promotion of respect between communities"[5]
  • Simon Stephens, " for his significant contribution to ecumenism, especially with the Eastern Orthodox Churches"[5]

2017[6][7]

  • Agnes Abuom, "for her exceptional contribution to the Ecumenical Movement, for her work with the World Council of Churches and currently its Moderator"
  • John Glass, "for leading the Elim Pentecostal Church into new ecumenical relationships and for his commitment to Christian unity in evangelism"
  • Peter Howdle, "for his outstanding contribution to Anglican-Methodist relations"
  • Antje Jackelén, "for her services to ecumenism - especially her leadership in addressing human, theological and social issues in partnership and dialogue"
  • Kallistos Ware, "for his outstanding contribution to Anglican-Orthodox theological dialogue"

Canterbury Cross for Services to the Church of EnglandEdit

The Canterbury Cross for Services to the Church of England is awarded for "outstanding service to the Church of England".[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2016

  • Peter Beesley, "for his contribution to the practical application of ecclesiastical, property and charity law throughout and beyond the Church of England over a period of approximately 40 years"[4][5]
  • Philip Giddings, "for sustained excellence in voluntary service to the Church"[5]
  • Sarah Horsman, "for her contribution to the alleviation of clergy stress"[5]
  • Carl Lee, "for his contribution to the alleviation of clergy stress"[5]
  • Bob Mackintosh, "for his contribution to leadership development in the Church of England"[4][5]

2017[6][7]

  • Peter Bruinvels, "for sustained and outstanding work in support of the Church of England"
  • Paul Dillingham, "for sustained and outstanding service to the Anglican Church in Finland"
  • Sir William Fittall, "for his outstanding and sustained contribution to the Church of England and to the Archbishops' Council in particular"
  • Jane Kennedy, "for outstanding conservation work, including supervision of major projects, at Ely Cathedral, Newcastle Cathedral and Christ Church, Oxford"[8]
  • George Lings, "for leading significant research into church growth and planting which has had a long lasting effect on dioceses across the Church of England"
  • Sir John Mummery, "for his outstanding contribution in the fields of clergy discipline and ecclesiastical law"
  • John Rees, "for services to the Church of England as both a lawyer and a priest"[9]
  • Sir Andreas Whittam Smith, "for his outstanding contribution as First Estates Commissioner of the Church of England"

2018[10]

  • Rupert Bursell, "for his contribution to the understanding and application of ecclesiastical law in the Church of England"
  • Michael Gilbert Clarke, "for outstanding service to church and society over many years"
  • John Collins, "for his outstanding record in growing churches and training evangelists and leaders"
  • Margaret Holness, "for sustained excellence as Education Correspondent of the Church Times for over twenty years"
  • Andrew Nunn, "for outstanding and unstinting service to the Church's and the Archbishop's administration for 37 years"
  • Rona Orme, "for outstanding work in the field of Christian education for children in Peterborough Diocese and beyond"

Dunstan Award for Prayer and the Religious LifeEdit

The Dunstan Award for Prayer and the Religious Life is named after St Dunstan (Archbishop of Canterbury in the 10th century). It is awarded for "outstanding contributions to the renewal of Prayer and the Religious Life".[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2016[5]

  • Fr Laurent Fabre, "for services towards the renewal of Religious Life"
  • Brother Samuel SSF, "for his contribution to revitalising the religious life"

2017[7]

  • Adrian Chatfield, "for outstanding contributions to prayer and spiritual formation through the work of the Simeon Centre at Ridley Hall, Cambridge"
  • Abbot Stuart Burns OSB, "for his outstanding contribution both to the Burford Community and its move to Mucknell Abbey and his wider involvement nationally in developing and supporting Fresh Expressions of the Religious Life"

Hubert Walter Award for Reconciliation and Interfaith CooperationEdit

The Hubert Walter Award for Reconciliation and Interfaith Cooperation is named after Hubert Walter (Archbishop of Canterbury from 1193 to 1205). It is awarded for "an outstanding contribution in the areas of reconciliation and interfaith cooperation".[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2016[5]

  • Bill Marsh, "for his outstanding work in mediation"
  • Ibrahim Mogra, "for his sustained contribution to understanding between the Abrahamic faiths"
  • Sir Andrew Pocock, "for his service to peace and stability in Nigeria"
  • David Rosen, "for his commitment and contribution to the work of Inter Religious relations between, particularly, the Jewish and Catholic faiths"
  • Martin Turner, "for his work in post-war reconciliation with Germany"

2017[7]

  • Samuel Azariah, "for outstanding dedication to supporting and strengthening the work of women and young people in the Church of Pakistan, and for fostering ecumenical relations among Christians in Pakistan"[6]
  • Jane Clements, "for her outstanding contribution to Christian-Jewish understanding and, especially, her leadership of the Council of Christians and Jews"[9]
  • Bill Musk, "for his contributions to the understanding of Islam for non-Muslims, through his outstanding five books on Islam and his many articles on the subject"[6]
  • Paride Taban, "for his contribution to reconciliation and interfaith cooperation in Southern Sudan"[6]

Alphege Award for Evangelism and WitnessEdit

The Alphege Award for Evangelism and Witness is named after St Alphege (Archbishop of Canterbury in the 11th century). It is awarded for evangelism and witness.[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2016[5]

  • Chrysogon Bamber, "for her distinguished service and leadership in Reader ministry"
  • John Coles, "for his contribution to Missio Dei"
  • Pamela Cooper, "for her contribution to the church in Japan over 41 years between 1968 and 2008"
  • Susan C. Essam, "for her contribution to Theological Education by Extension in Nigeria"
  • Agu Irukwu, "for his contribution to the sustainable spread of the gospel of Jesus Christ in the United Kingdom and beyond"
  • Tim Royle, "for his contribution to the life of the Church of England for more than sixty years as an evangelical preacher, innovator and enabler"

2017[7]

  • Philip Fletcher, "for outstanding leadership in mission through his chairmanship of the Mission and Public Affairs Council"
  • Robert and Mary Hopkins, "for outstanding contributions to fresh expressions of church"

Lanfranc Award for Education and ScholarshipEdit

The Lanfranc Award for Education and Scholarship is named after Lanfranc (Archbishop of Canterbury in the 11th century). It is awarded for education and scholarship.[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2016[5]

  • David V. Day, "for his contribution to Christian education and preaching"[11]
  • Maureen Hogarth, "for her exemplary career in teaching imbued with Christian values"
  • Eeva John, "for her contribution to the development of theological education for ministry and mission across England"

2017[6][7]

  • Zoë Bennett, "for her outstanding contribution to theological education in East Anglia and beyond"
  • Jeremy Morris, "for outstanding contributions as a teacher, scholar, and nurturer of the desire to learn, which have influenced the next generation of ordinands and enhanced the Church of England's self-understanding"
  • Haifa Najjar, "for her outstanding contribution to education in Jordan and her exemplary leading role in Jordanian society as a Christian woman"
  • Colin Podmore, "for services to education and scholarship in support of the Church of England and the wider Church"

Langton Award for Community ServiceEdit

The Langton Award for Community Service is named after Stephen Langton (Archbishop of Canterbury in the 13th century). It is awarded "for outstanding contribution to the community in accordance with the Church's teaching".[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2016[5]

  • Sir Tony Baldry, "for his community service, especially as an advocate for the continuing contribution of parish churches to the common good"
  • Geoff Davies, "for his farsighted commitment to environmental concerns"
  • Joel Edwards, "for his unique contribution in uniting evangelical Christians across the UK in challenging global injustice"
  • Duncan Green, "for his contribution to the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games"[12]
  • Arthur Hawes, "for his contribution to the ministry of the Church of England, particularly in the area of mental health"
  • Sir Hector Sants, "for his contribution to the Church of England's work for the common good in all communities"

2017[6][7]

  • Joan Ashton, "for outstanding work for the Community of Rotherham General Hospital as Coordinator of Chaplaincy work"
  • Frank Field, "for sustained and outstanding commitment to social welfare"
  • Suhaila Tarazi, "for outstanding service to the community in one of the poorest and most neglected corners of the world, overseeing with a calm grace, the provision of vital medical services at the Al Ahli Arab Hospital, Gaza"

Cranmer Award for WorshipEdit

The Cranmer Award for Worship is named after Thomas Cranmer (Archbishop of Canterbury from 1533 to 1555). It is awarded for "outstanding contributions to all aspects of worship in the Church, including both words and music".[2]

List of recipientsEdit

2016[5]

  • James Lancelot, "for his contribution to cathedral worship through excellence in the practice of music within the liturgy"
  • Philip Moore, "for his contribution to the English choral tradition as a composer, arranger and performer"
  • Michael Perham, for his work on Common Worship[13]
  • Matt Redman, "for his contribution to the worship life of the Church"
  • Michael Williams, "for his distinguished contribution to church music in the Diocese of Derby and beyond"

2017[7]

  • Ralph Allwood, "for services to choral music in the Church of England and especially for fostering musical education amongst disadvantaged children"
  • Vicky Beeching, "for outstanding contributions to contemporary worship music"
  • Paul Hale, "for his distinguished service as Rector Chori and Cathedral Organist at Southwell Minster and as one of the UK's foremost organ consultants"
  • Anne Harrison, "for her sustained and outstanding contribution to music in worship"[7][14]
  • Tim Hughes, "for his outstanding contribution to contemporary worship music
  • Stuart Townend, "for his outstanding contribution to contemporary worship music"

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Archbishop of Canterbury announces new set of awards". Archbishop of Canterbury. 21 March 2016. Retrieved 13 July 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Archbishop's Awards and Examinations". Archbishop of Canterbury. Retrieved 13 July 2017.
  3. ^ "Archbishop makes Cross of St Augustine and Lambeth Cross awards". Archbishop of Canterbury. 8 November 2004. Retrieved 13 August 2017.
  4. ^ a b c "First ceremony for Archbishop of Canterbury's new awards". Anglican Communion News Service. Anglican Communion Office. 1 April 2016. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "The Archbishop of Canterbury's Awards: Lambeth Palace" (pdf). Archbishop of Canterbury. 31 March 2016. Retrieved 14 July 2017.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Archbishop of Canterbury's Awards ceremony held at Lambeth Palace". Archbishop of Canterbury. 13 June 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i "The Archbishop of Canterbury's Awards: Citations in Alphabetical Order" (PDF). Archbishop of Canterbury. 9 June 2017. Archived from the original (pdf) on 19 June 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  8. ^ "Prestigious Award" (pdf). Ely Cathedral Newsletter (142). July 2017. p. 3. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  9. ^ a b "Archbishops' Awards for Jane and John". Diocese of Oxford. 28 June 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  10. ^ "Archbishop of Canterbury presents 2018 Lambeth Awards". The Archbishop Of Canterbury. 6 April 2018. Retrieved 14 April 2018.
  11. ^ Wyatt, Tim (24 March 2016). "Welby announces Lambeth Award recipients". The Church Times. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  12. ^ "Archdeacon of Northolt receives award for London 2012 work". Sports Chaplaincy UK. 25 April 2016. Retrieved 14 July 2017.
  13. ^ The Cranmer Award - Michael Perham on YouTube
  14. ^ "Durham church musician receives accolade from the Archbishop of Canterbury". ITV News. 26 June 2017. Retrieved 14 July 2017.