The Gallant Blade

The Gallant Blade is a 1948 American Cinecolor adventure film directed by Henry Levin and starring Larry Parks as a peasant hero of France in the 17th century after the Thirty Years War.[1]

The Gallant Blade
The Gallant Blade.jpg
Directed byHenry Levin
Produced byIrving Starr
StarringLarry Parks
Music byGeorge Duning
CinematographyCharles Lawton, Jr.
Burnett Guffey
Edited byViola Lawrence
Production
company
Columbia Pictures
Distributed byColumbia Pictures
Release date
  • October 23, 1948 (1948-10-23) (New York City)
Running time
81 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

CastEdit

ProductionEdit

Columbia announced in 1945 they would make The Gallant Blade based on a short story by Alexander Dumas. It was to be a follow up to The Fighting Guardsman.[2] It was part of a boom in swashbuckling pictures in 1945.[3]

The film was not made immediately. In 1947 Irving Starr was announced as producer and Charles Vidor as director. Then Vidor was replaced by Henry Levin. Larry Parks was signed to star. He had just made a swashbuckler for Columbia, The Swordsman, then initiated legal proceedings against the studio in July to get out of this contract with them. Parks had refused payment since then; he agreed to be paid for The Gallant Blade on the proviso it did not affect his legal actions.[4][5]

Filming started 1 December 1947. It was also known as The Gay Blade.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ J. Chapman; M. Glancy; S. Harper, eds. (2007), The New Film History, Springer, pp. 122–123, ISBN 9780230206229
  2. ^ Schallert, E. (1945, Jan 30). Big build-up planned for burnett subject. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165580518
  3. ^ By FRED, S. H. (1945, Apr 15). HOLLYWOOD ON THE CLEFS. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/107182987
  4. ^ By THOMAS F BRADY Special to The New York Times. (1947, Nov 18). LARRY PARKS TO DO FILM FOR COLUMBIA. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/108042983
  5. ^ By, T. F. (1947, Nov 23). RKO sets policy of hiring no 'known communists' -- 'all my sons' tailored to the screen -- axe falls at metro. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/107746935
  6. ^ Schallert, E. (1947, Dec 01). DRAMA AND FILM. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165783522

External linksEdit