The Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge

The Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge is a chess video game released in 1991 by Telegames for the Atari Lynx. Players can either play against the game or against another player using the same console. The game engine was written by Fidelity Electronics, makers of various chess computers, and reached a master rating of 2325 Elo.[citation needed]

The Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge
Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge cover art.jpg
Cover art in all regions
Developer(s)Telegames
Publisher(s)Telegames
EngineFidelity Electronics[1]
Platform(s)Atari Lynx
Release
Genre(s)Chess
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer
(up to two players via ComLynx)

GameplayEdit

 
Gameplay screenshot.

The program has 17 levels of play. Eight of them are time based level setting the average response time from 5 seconds (level time 1) to 4 minutes (level 8). The eight following levels restrict the program ability to look ahead. For example, level depth 1 restricts the program to 1 ply or 1 half move, level depth 2 restricts the computer to 2 plies or 2 half moves, and so on to level depth 8. The 17th level is an infinite level, the computation can either be stopped by the user or by the finding of a forced mate.

Development and releaseEdit

ReceptionEdit

Reception
Review scores
PublicationScore
AllGame     [2]
IGN7.0/10[3]
Aktueller Software Markt8/12[4]
Atari Gaming Headquarters7/10[5]
Consoles +41%[6]
Génération 490%[7]
Joypad75%[8]
Joystick75%[9]
Play Time70%[10]
Power Play70%[11]

The Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge was met with mostly positive reception.[12] Robert A. Jung reviewed the game which was published to IGN, in his final verdict he wrote; "Telegames has made a respectable entry into the Lynx game market with this title. As a chess game, The Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge fits the bill. It plays a strong, challenging game, though it presumes some knowledge of chess on your part. The lack of a board set-up option, however, is inexcusable; it could have been added with very little effort. However, if you can live with this omission, and want to play chess on the go, then Fidelity Chess is a good solution." Giving a final score of 7 out of 10.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Telegames - The First Licensed Publisher For The Atari Lynx - The Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 18. Sendai Publishing. November 1991. p. 135.
  2. ^ Knight, Kyle (1998). "Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge - Review". AllGame. All Media Network. Archived from the original on 2014-11-15. Retrieved 2020-06-03.
  3. ^ a b A. Jung, Robert (July 7, 1999). "Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge — Telegames makes a respectable entry into the Lynx game market with Fidelty Chess". IGN. Ziff Davis. Retrieved 2020-06-03.
  4. ^ Amann, Hans-Joachim (July 1991). "Konsolen - Schachmatt - Ultimate Chess Challenge". Aktueller Software Markt (in German). No. 54. Tronic Verlag. p. 114.
  5. ^ Iida, Keita (1995). "AGH Lynx Review: THE FIDELITY ULTIMATE CHESS CHALLENGE". atarihq.com. Retrieved 2020-06-02.
  6. ^ Defrance, Laurent (June 1992). "Lynx Review - Ultimate Chess Challenge". Consoles + (in French). No. 10. M.E.R.7. p. 132.
  7. ^ "Consoles: Ultimate Chess Challenge". Génération 4 (in French). No. 45. Computec Media France. June 1992. p. 158.
  8. ^ Morisse, Jean-François (June 1992). "Ultimate Chess Challenge - Duel Sur Plateau!". Joypad (in French). No. 9. Yellow Media. p. 90.
  9. ^ Morisse, Jean-François (June 1992). "Consoles News: The Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge". Joystick (in French). No. 28. Sipress. p. 135.
  10. ^ Szameitat, Thorsten (April 1992). "Review - Konsolen: F.Ul.C.C." (PDF). Play Time (in German). No. 11. CT Computec Verlag GmbH & Co. KG. p. 82.
  11. ^ Locker, Anatol (June 1991). "Videospiele / Tests: Matt-o-mania - Ultimate Chess Challenge". Power Play (in German). No. 38. Future Verlag. p. 132.
  12. ^ Molyneaux, Maurice (July 1991). "Gaming on the Go - Fidelity Ultimate Chess Challenge by Telegames". VideoGames & Computer Entertainment. No. 30. Larry Flynt Publications. pp. 98–100.

External linksEdit