The Beijing News

The Beijing News is a Chinese Communist Party-owned newspaper from Beijing. The Chinese name of the newspaper is Xīn Jīng Bào (Chinese: 新京报), meaning "New Beijing News", which is a reference to the defunct Peking Gazette (simplified Chinese: 京报; traditional Chinese: 京報; lit. 'Beijing News').

The Beijing News
Typedaily newspaper
Formattabloid (in Chinese: 四开 size)[1]
Owner(s)Publicity Department of the Beijing municipal committee of the Chinese Communist Party
Founder(s)
  • Guangming Daily Press
  • Nanfang Media Group
PublisherThe Beijing News Press
(Chinese: 新京报社)
Founded11 November 2003; 17 years ago (2003-11-11)
Political alignmentChinese Communist Party
LanguageChinese
CityBeijing
CountryChina
Websitewww.bjnews.com.cn
Free online archiveswww.bjnews.com.cn
The Beijing News
Simplified Chinese新京报
Traditional Chinese新京報
Literal meaningNew Beijing News
(or New Capital News)

The Chinese publications serial number of the newspaper is CN11-0245.[2]

HistoryEdit

The Beijing News began publishing on 11 November 2003[1] by a joint venture of Guangming Daily Press and Nanfang Media Group (also transliterated as "Southern Newspaper Group" or Southern Daily Press Group),[1][3] both owned by the sub-committees of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), the ruling party of China since 1949. Guangming Daily Press was owned by the Central Committee[4] while Nanfang Media Group was owned by the Guangdong provincial committee of the CCP.[5] Initially, staff from Nanfang Media Group dominated the day-to-day operation of the newspaper, turning The Beijing News into one of Beijing's most influential newspapers.[3]

According to Jonathan Hassid, an assistant professor (from 2015 to 2018) at Iowa State University, the two publishers had different difficulties in their publishing business. Guangming Daily had a valuable central-level administrative rank but was the country poorest major publisher, while "Nanfang" had money to invest but its administrative rank was restricting the publisher to obtain new publication number or expand outside their home province Guangdong.[3] According to another article by Congressional-Executive Commission on China, "the Guangming Daily consistently follows the Party's line, while the Southern Daily Press Group's [sic] publications tend to be more commercially-oriented and willing to test Chinese censors".[6]

In 2005, staff and online readers protested the sacking of the editors of the newspaper.[7]

In July 2011, the newspaper defied the ban on reporting Wenzhou train collision.[8] However, in the same month, the newspaper scrapped 9 pages of special reporting.[9]

On 1 September 2011, the newspaper was taken over by the Publicity Department of the Beijing municipal committee of the Chinese Communist Party [zh].[1]

In 2013, it was reported that Dai Zigeng, a publisher of the newspaper, had verbally resigned due to political pressure from the propaganda authorities.[10][11]

In 2014, it was reported that the Publicity Department had acquired the remaining 49% stake from Nanfang Media Group.[12] According to the South China Morning Post, an English newspaper from Hong Kong, general public were feared that The Beijing News would turned into a "propaganda mouthpiece".[12] In February 2014, The Beijing News, made a news coverage regarding Zhou Yongkang's son possible corruption, but the article was take down from the newspaper's website.[13]

In 2018 the merger of the newspapers The Beijing News, the Beijing Morning Post [zh] and the news website qianlong.com (千龙网) was announced.[14] Beijing Morning Post ceased the publication in the same year.[15]

See alsoEdit

  • Beijing Times, another Beijing newspaper, ceased publication in 2017
  • Beijing Daily Group: a publishing group that was also owned by the Beijing Municipal Party Committee,[16] the owner of The Beijing News. Beijing Daily Group publishes Beijing Morning Post as well as 8 other newspapers as of 2016,[16] such as:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d 关于我们 [About us]. The Beijing News (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 12 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  2. ^ "《新京报》简介_光明日报网上报史馆".
  3. ^ a b c Jonathan Hassid (2016). "Beyond pushback". China's Unruly Journalists: How Committed Professionals are Changing the People's Republic. Routledge. p. 113. ISBN 978-1-315-66611-2. Retrieved 17 April 2019 – via Google Book.
  4. ^ "Archived copy" 报社概况 (in Chinese). Guangming Daily Press. Archived from the original on 22 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Archived copy" 南方报业传媒集团简介 (in Chinese). Nanfang Media Group. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Chinese Authorities Crack Down on Progressive Newspaper Publisher". Congressional-Executive Commission on China. 3 February 2006. Archived from the original on 18 April 2019. Retrieved 18 April 2019.
  7. ^ Mure Dickie (31 December 2005). Written at Beijing. "Journalists protest at dismissal of Beijing editor". Financial Times. London. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  8. ^ Kathrin Hille (27 July 2011). Written at Beijing. "Chinese media defy censors to attack government on crash". Financial Times. London. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  9. ^ Patti Waldmeir (31 July 2011). Written at Shanghai. "Beijing imposes media ban on rail crash coverage". Financial Times. London. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  10. ^ Ng, Teddy; Li Jing (10 January 2013). "Media crisis spreads as row erupts over state meddling at Beijing News". South China Morning Post. Hong Kong. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  11. ^ Priyanka Boghani; Carlson, Ben (9 January 2013). "Beijing News Publisher Resigns Over Censorship Dispute". CNBC. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  12. ^ a b Boehler, Patrick (27 January 2014). "Sale of stake in outspoken Beijing News may turn it into 'propaganda mouthpiece'". South China Morning Post. Hong Kong. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  13. ^ Boehler, Patrick (26 February 2014). "Beijing paper's investigative report on Zhou Yongkang's son censored". South China Morning Post. Hong Kong. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  14. ^ "Archived copy" 新京报、千龙网、北京晨报将合并整合. jrj.com.cn (in Chinese). 31 October 2018. Archived from the original on 17 April 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  15. ^ 1998年之前,,,2018年以后. Beijing Morning Post (in Chinese). 31 December 2018 [local time]. Archived from the original on 30 December 2018. Retrieved 17 April 2019.
  16. ^ a b 北京日报报业集团简介. bjd.com.cn (in Chinese). Beijing Daily Group. Archived from the original on 12 March 2016. Retrieved 17 April 2019.

External linksEdit