Tejen

  (Redirected from Tedzhen)

Tejen (older spellings: Tedzhen, Tejend, Tejent) is an oasis city with district status in the Karakum Desert, in Ahal Province of Turkmenistan. It lies along the M37 highway, between Dushak and Mary, 223 kilometres (139 mi) by road southeast of Ashgabat.[1] It has a population of approximately 52,000. To the east is the larger oasis of Mary.

Tejen
Mosque under construction in Tejen, Ahal Province, Turkmenistan, in May 2018
Mosque under construction in Tejen, Ahal Province, Turkmenistan, in May 2018
Tejen is located in Turkmenistan
Tejen
Tejen
Location in Turkmenistan
Coordinates: 37°23′N 60°30′E / 37.383°N 60.500°E / 37.383; 60.500
Country Turkmenistan
ProvinceAhal Province
Elevation
161 m (528 ft)
Population
 • Total52,000

EtymologyEdit

The meaning of tejen is unclear. Atanyyazov explained,

...The meaning of this ancient name is not clear...Barthold noted that this name was also used in the form of Tuzhen in the X-XI centuries...Vambery derived it from the words tei-e hend (tei-e kent, tei— “down”, kent - “village”, “city”) and derived from that “downstream of the city,” “downstream of the city,” or “downstream of the river". He writes that he may have understood the meaning of the word as "city in the desert"...the name of the village along the Gerrud River is mentioned...This name also means "the foot of the city"...As Barthold rightly points out, this name is not the name of the first river, but the name of the county, village, or land, for the river itself is in its upper reaches Hererrud (Herat-rud, i.e., the "Herat River"), and below Sarahs is Khushk-rud, i.e., it was known as the "Waterless River"...In Persian khushk means "dry", "shroud", rud - "river". This name is a characteristic sign of the river, that is, it is associated with the cutting off of its water in the summer. [2]

HistoryEdit

In 1883 it was occupied by General Komarov during the Russian conquest of Turkestan. In 1916, when the Turkmens participated in a revolt against the Russians, Tejen was a hotbed of activity.[3]

EconomyEdit

Tejen is known for its melon production, and contains numerous textile factories. The city features one hotel, the Hotel Tejen. Tejen is the site of the $240 million Tejen Carbamide (urea) Plant, inaugurated on March 18, 2005, with a design capacity of 350,000 tonnes of urea per year.[4][5] It is also known for its narcotics, which are known locally as "Tejen tea".[6]

Government installationsEdit

A prison is located in Tejen.[7][8]

LandmarksEdit

The city contains the Charman Ahun Mosque and the Hotel Tejen.[6]

WildlifeEdit

Historical records indicate that the Caspian tiger was found in this region.[9]

TransportEdit

It is a stop on the Trans-Caspian railway, and in the 1996 a new rail line via Sarahs to Mashhad in Iran was opened.[6] Tejen is located on the M37 highway, and the P-7 highway leads south from Tejen to Sarahs and onward to Iran.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Google (9 October 2016). "Tejen" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 9 October 2016.
  2. ^ Atanyyazov, S. (1970). Türkmenistanyň Toponymyk Sözlügi (in Turkmen). Ashgabat: Ylym. p. 219-220.
  3. ^ "Turkenistan". Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 8 October 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "В Туркменистане сдан в эксплуатацию Тедженский карбамидный завод" (in Russian). Turkmenistan.ru.
  5. ^ "Страсти по каспийскому карбамиду" (in Russian). KORABEL.RU. 20 August 2019.
  6. ^ a b c Brummell, Paul (2005). Turkmenistan. Bradt Travel Guides. pp. 129–30. ISBN 978-1-84162-144-9.
  7. ^ "Туркменистан: О ситуации в колонии г. Теджена" (in Russian). Alternative News of Turkmenistan. 16 October 2018.
  8. ^ "Туркменбаши жестоко подавляет тюремный мятеж в маленьком Теджене" (in Russian). Независимая газета. 19 November 2002.
  9. ^ Geptner, V. G., Sludskij, A. A. (1992) [1972]. "Tiger". Mlekopitajuščie Sovetskogo Soiuza. Moskva: Vysšaia Škola [Mammals of the Soviet Union. Volume II, Part 2. Carnivora (Hyaenas and Cats)]. Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution and the National Science Foundation. pp. 95–202.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)

Coordinates: 37°23′N 60°30′E / 37.383°N 60.500°E / 37.383; 60.500