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Ted Collins (manager)

Collins and singer Kate Smith
on her television show (1953)

Ted Collins (October 12, 1900 – May 27, 1964) was an American show business manager, best known for managing singer and TV show star Kate Smith, (1907-1986) for thirty years.[1][2][3][4]

Collins was also involved in professional sports, as owner of the National Football League's franchises Boston Yanks (1944–48) and which followed as the New York Bulldogs/Yanks (1949–51) - later became the Dallas Texans in 1952.[4][5][6] He was considerably more successful in entertainment management than as an oldtime NFL owner.[7][8]

Collins died at age 63 in May 1964, of a heart attack in Lake Placid, New York at a doctor's office. He had previous health issues, including a heart attack in 1956.[1][9][10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Ted Collins, business manager for Kate Smith 30 years, dies". New York Times. (obituary). May 28, 1964. Retrieved April 21, 2016.
  2. ^ Butterfield, C.E. (January 5, 1954). "Ted Collins in new role as chief at 'Cracker Barrel'". Reading Eagle. Pennsylvania. Associated Press. p. 18.
  3. ^ "Kate Smith, Ted Collins partnership regarded unique". Reading Eagle. Pennsylvania. United Press. January 28, 1956. p. 12.
  4. ^ a b "Ted Collins dies; Kate Smith weeps". St. Petersburg Times. Florida. UPI. May 28, 1964. p. 9A.
  5. ^ "Ewart is selected to coach Bulldogs". Milwaukee Journal. Associated Press. February 3, 1949. p. 6, part 2.
  6. ^ "Ted Collins dies at 64". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Florida. Associated Press. May 28, 1964. p. 2.
  7. ^ Reichler, Joe (January 18, 1952). "Ted Collins may make good his threat to quit N.F.L." The Day. New London, Connecticut. Associated Press. p. 12.
  8. ^ Fleischer, Jack (January 27, 1952). "Ted Collins can only blame self for losing Yankees". Sunday Herald. Bridgeport, Connecticut. p. 21.
  9. ^ "Kate Smith loyal to her manager". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. Florida. Associated Press. March 18, 1956. p. 7A.
  10. ^ "Kate Smith set to take it easy after 25 years". Tuscaloosa News. Alabama. Associated Press. June 18, 1956. p. 4.

External linksEdit