Open main menu

Taylor Lynn Hearn (born August 30, 1994) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Texas Rangers of Major League Baseball (MLB).

Taylor Hearn
Taylor Hearn (cropped).png
Hearn at Dyess Air Force Base in 2019
Texas Rangers – No. 63
Pitcher
Born: (1994-08-30) August 30, 1994 (age 25)
Royse City, Texas
Bats: Left Throws: Left
MLB debut
April 25, 2019, for the Texas Rangers
MLB statistics
(through 2019 season)
Win–loss record0–1
Earned run average108.00
Strikeouts0
Teams

Amateur careerEdit

Hearn attended Royse City High School in Royse City, Texas.[1] He was drafted after his senior year by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 22nd round of the 2012 Major League Baseball draft. Rather than sign, he chose to attend San Jacinto College to play college baseball. He was then drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the 36th round of the 2013 MLB draft, but did not sign. After a second season at San Jacinto, he was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in 25th round of the 2014 MLB draft. He chose to transfer to Oklahoma Baptist University instead of signing. After one year at Oklahoma Baptist, he was drafted by the Washington Nationals in the fifth round of the 2015 MLB draft and signed.[2][3]

Professional careerEdit

Hearn spent the 2015 season with the both the rookie GCL Nationals and the Class A Short Season Auburn Doubledays, posting a 1–5 record and a 3.56 earned run average (ERA) in 12 games (11 starts). He began 2016 with the GCL Nationals and was later promoted to the Class A Hagerstown Suns.

On July 30, 2016, the Nationals traded Hearn along with Felipe Vázquez to the Pittsburgh Pirates for Mark Melancon.[4] He played the rest of the season with their Class A West Virginia Power. In 18 games (7 starts) pitched between the Nationals, Doubledays, and Suns, he had a 2–1 record with a 2.44 ERA and 75 strikeouts in 51.2 innings. Hearn played the entire 2017 season with the Class A-Advanced Bradenton Marauders, accumulating a 4–6 record and a 4.12 ERA in 19 games (18 starts).[5] He began 2018 with the Double-A Altoona Curve and was selected for the Eastern League All-Star team.[5]

Hearn was traded to the Texas Rangers, along with Sherten Apostel, in exchange for Keone Kela on July 30, 2018.[6] He finished the year with the Double-A Frisco RoughRiders. In 24 starts between both clubs, he went 4–8 with a 3.49 ERA.[7][5] The Rangers added him to their 40-man roster after the season.[8] In 2019, Hearn was optioned to the Triple-A Nashville Sounds to open the season.[9] In 4 games for Nashville, Hearn went 1–3 with a 4.05 ERA and 26 strikeouts over 20 innings.[10]

Hearn was promoted to the Rangers on April 25, 2019, to make his major league debut that night against the Seattle Mariners.[11] He pitched just ​13 of an inning, allowing five runs (four earned).[12] On April 26, he was placed on the injured list with inflammation in his left elbow.[13] Hearn did not return to game action in 2019, as he battled reoccurrences of elbow inflammation.[14]

Personal lifeEdit

Hearn's grandfather Cleo, father Robby, and three uncles are all former rodeo cowboys.[15] Cleo Hearn holds many distinctions; he was the first African American to attend college on a rodeo scholarship, the first African American Marlboro Man, and the founder of The Cowboys of Color Rodeo.[16] While serving in the US Army, Cleo also served on the Presidential Honor Guard under President John F. Kennedy.[7] Taylor participated in rodeos growing up from the age 4 through age 17.[17]

Hearn's high school number 21 was retired by Royse City High School in 2017.[18]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matt Fisher (August 3, 2018). "Meet Royse City's Taylor Hearn, new Rangers prospect". WFAA ABC DFW. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  2. ^ Bill Ladson (March 7, 2016). "Nationals Taylor Hearn Hard-Throwing Prospect". MLB.com. Retrieved November 5, 2016.
  3. ^ Byron Kerr (March 25, 2016). "More Insight on Left-Hander Taylor Hearn and Outfielder Victor Robles". MASN Sports. Retrieved November 5, 2016.
  4. ^ "Nats Land Star Closer Melancon in Pirates Trade". ESPN.com. July 31, 2016. Retrieved November 5, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c "Taylor Hearn Stats, Highlights, Bio". Minor League Baseball. Retrieved March 29, 2018.
  6. ^ Adam Berry (July 31, 2018). "Pirates Acquire Reliever Keone Kela". MLB.com. Retrieved July 31, 2018.
  7. ^ a b Jamey Newberg (August 6, 2018). "Controlling the controllables: New Rangers pitcher Taylor Hearn is coming home, and still learning the ropes". The Athletic. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  8. ^ T.R. Sullivan (November 20, 2019). "Edinson Volquez, 3 Others Added to 40-Man". MLB.com. Retrieved December 14, 2018.
  9. ^ RotoWire Staff (March 12, 2019). "Rangers' Taylor Hearn: Optioned to Nashville". CBSSports.com. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  10. ^ David Claybourn (May 2, 2017). "Royse City-ex Taylor Hearn injures arm in debut with Rangers". Herald-Banner. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  11. ^ Evan Grant (April 24, 2019). "Taylor Hearn's early call-up, the state of Rangers pitching and a 9th-inning Joe West experience". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  12. ^ Evan Grant (April 26, 2019). "Taylor Hearn has shaky debut in an all-around embarrassing loss for Rangers". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  13. ^ Jeff Wilson (April 27, 2019). "Diagnosis is in on Taylor Hearn's left elbow. He and Rangers are breathing sighs of relief". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  14. ^ Evan Grant (August 5, 2019). "Taylor Hearn shut down for season with elbow issue; other pitching injury updates". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  15. ^ T.R. Sullivan (February 24, 2019). "For prospect Hearn, rodeo runs in the family". MLB.com. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  16. ^ Don Russell. "Cleo Hearn – Founder of The Cowboys of Color Rodeo". cowboysofcolor.net. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  17. ^ David Laurila (February 11, 2018). "Sunday Notes: Taylor Hearn and the Tale of the Black Rodeo Cowboys". FanGraphs. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  18. ^ Jim Hardin (March 1, 2017). "Hearn number retired". Herald-Banner. Retrieved October 3, 2019.

External linksEdit