Tangub, officially known as the City of Tangub (Cebuano: Dakbayan sa Tangub; Tagalog: Lungsod ng Tangub), is a 4th class component city in the province of Misamis Occidental, Philippines. According to the 2020 census, it has a population of 68,389 people. [3]

Tangub
Regidor
City of Tangub
Tangub City Sports Complex
Tangub City Sports Complex
Official seal of Tangub
Nickname: 
Christmas Symbols Capital of the Philippines
Map of Misamis Occidental with Tangub highlighted
Map of Misamis Occidental with Tangub highlighted
OpenStreetMap
Tangub is located in Philippines
Tangub
Tangub
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 8°04′00″N 123°45′00″E / 8.06666667°N 123.75°E / 8.06666667; 123.75Coordinates: 8°04′00″N 123°45′00″E / 8.06666667°N 123.75°E / 8.06666667; 123.75
CountryPhilippines
RegionNorthern Mindanao
ProvinceMisamis Occidental
District 2nd district
FoundedDecember 4, 1929
CityhoodJune 17, 1967
Barangays55 (see Barangays)
Government
[1]
 • TypeSangguniang Panlungsod
 • MayorSabiniano "Ben" S. Canama (NP)
 • Vice MayorTito B. Decina (PDPLBN)
 • RepresentativeSancho Fernando "Ando" F. Oaminal (NP)
 • City Council
Members
 • Electorate40,080 voters (2019)
Area
 • Total162.78 km2 (62.85 sq mi)
Elevation
243 m (797 ft)
Highest elevation
2,421 m (7,943 ft)
Lowest elevation
0 m (0 ft)
Population
 (2020 census) [3]
 • Total68,389
 • Density420/km2 (1,100/sq mi)
 • Households
12,868
Economy
 • Income class4th city income class
 • Poverty incidence27.50% (2018)[4]
 • Revenue₱651,952,141.00 (2020)
 • Assets₱1,846,288,261.00 (2020)
 • Expenditure₱435,133,395.00 (2020)
 • Liabilities₱487,197,670.00 (2020)
Service provider
 • ElectricityMisamis Occidental 2 Electric Cooperative (MOELCI 2)
Time zoneUTC+8 (PST)
ZIP code
7214
PSGC
IDD:area code+63 (0)88
Native languagesSubanon
Cebuano
Tagalog
Feast dateSeptember 29
Catholic dioceseArchdiocese of Ozamiz
Patron saintMichael the Archangel
Websitetangubcity.gov.ph

Tangub City is also where the Panguil Bay Bridge is situated. Once completed, the 3.77 km (2.34 mi) bridge will connect Tangub, Misamis Occidental to Tubod, Lanao del Norte.

HistoryEdit

The city of Tangub grew from a small town. The cty's name came from the Subanen word "Tangkub", which is a rice container made of tree bark woven together by rattan strips. A Spanish soldier on patrol in the area found a dead man whom the Subanens described as bitten by a snake inside the “tangkub” when he checked if there was still rice in the container. Not understanding the dialect, the soldiers reported that there was a dead man from “tangkub” and the name stuck, which later on was changed to Tangub.

Trade and commerce emerged when many agricultural products were harvested, and the Subanos bartered their land for goods brought in by other Christian settlers. Years after, Chinese merchants settled in this place and helped to hasten the transportation of the settlements into a civilized communities. Tangub became successful during the years 1898-1910. In 1929, Tangub became a municipality by virtue of an executive order by American Governor-General Dwight Davis. In this process, Tangub was separated from its mother municipality of Misamis, now Ozamiz City. The new municipality of Tangub then included all the barrios of the present municipality of Bonifacio, formerly known as Digson. Bonifacio became a municipality, shortly before the outbreak of the Second World War with Hon. Demetrio Fernan as municipal mayor. At some point, the name of the municipality was changed to “Regidor”; however it was reverted a few years later.

CityhoodEdit

On June 17, 1967, under Republic Act No. 5131, Tangub became a chartered city.

GeographyEdit

Tangub is close to Zamboanga del Sur and Zamboanga del Norte provinces, while across the bay is Lanao del Norte. Tangub is 77.1 km (77,100 mi) from Maria Cristina Falls, the main source of hydroelectric power in Mindanao.

ClimateEdit

Climate data for Tangub City, Misamis Occidental
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 29
(84)
30
(86)
31
(88)
31
(88)
30
(86)
30
(86)
29
(84)
30
(86)
30
(86)
30
(86)
30
(86)
30
(86)
30
(86)
Average low °C (°F) 22
(72)
22
(72)
22
(72)
23
(73)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
24
(75)
23
(73)
23
(73)
23
(74)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 69
(2.7)
58
(2.3)
67
(2.6)
60
(2.4)
109
(4.3)
114
(4.5)
83
(3.3)
78
(3.1)
76
(3.0)
92
(3.6)
86
(3.4)
63
(2.5)
955
(37.7)
Average rainy days 12.8 11.6 14.8 17.4 24.8 23.5 20.7 18.5 17.4 22.5 21.6 15.6 221.2
Source: Meteoblue[5]

BarangaysEdit

Tangub is politically subdivided into 55 barangays.

  • Silanga
  • Marcos (Aquino)
  • Santa Maria (Baga)
  • Balatacan
  • Baluk
  • Banglay
  • Mantic
  • Mingcanaway
  • Bintana
  • Bocator
  • Bongabong
  • Caniangan
  • Capalaran
  • Catagan
  • Barangay I - City Hall (Poblacion)
  • Barangay II - Marilou Annex (Poblacion)
  • Barangay IV - St. Michael (Poblacion)
  • Isidro D. Tan (Dimalooc)
  • Garang
  • Guinabot
  • Guinalaban
  • Hoyohoy
  • Kauswagan
  • Kimat
  • Labuyo
  • Lorenzo Tan
  • Barangay VI - Lower Polao (Poblacion)
  • Lumban
  • Maloro
  • Barangay V - Malubog (Poblacion)
  • Manga
  • Maquilao
  • Barangay III- Market Kalubian (Poblacion)
  • Matugnao
  • Minsubong
  • Owayan
  • Paiton
  • Panalsalan
  • Pangabuan
  • Prenza
  • Salimpuno
  • San Antonio
  • San Apolinario
  • San Vicente
  • Santa Cruz
  • Santo Niño
  • Sicot
  • Silanga
  • Silangit
  • Simasay
  • Sumirap
  • Taguite
  • Tituron
  • Tugas
  • Barangay VII - Upper Polao (Poblacion)
  • Villaba

DemographicsEdit

Population census of Tangub
YearPop.±% p.a.
1939 44,743—    
1948 20,353−8.38%
1960 21,101+0.30%
1970 30,918+3.89%
1975 40,461+5.54%
1980 40,401−0.03%
1990 42,926+0.61%
1995 46,004+1.31%
2000 49,695+1.67%
2007 56,644+1.82%
2010 59,892+2.05%
2015 63,011+0.97%
2020 68,389+1.62%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[6][7][8][9]

In the 2020 census, the population of Tangub was 68,389 people, [3] with a density of 420 inhabitants per square kilometre or 1,100 inhabitants per square mile.

EconomyEdit


CultureEdit

Notable events and festivalsEdit

Tangub, through its Sinanduloy Cultural Troupe, is a regular participant of the Sinulog Festival, a festival held in Cebu City. This festival is the pageantry of sights, sounds and colors as it honors and pays homage to Sr. Santo Niño, the child Jesus. The highlights of the festival is from January 9–18, yearly. Tangub City has won a record of twelve grand champion streak in the Sinulog-Based Category of the festival.

Through the recent years, Tangub has been popularly dubbed as the Christmas Symbols Capital of the Philippines. Every year, the city will celebrate Christmas through the Tangub City Christmas Symbols Festival. During the month-long festival, the city fills with a delightful array of illuminated holiday decor, bathing the streets in a most enticing glow.

The city also has a festival called the Dalit Cultural Festivial. It is held in honor of the city's patron saint, Saint Michael the Archangel. It is celebrated every September 29-the feast day of Michaelmas. It is participated by the city's barangays through clusters represented by local schools.

The Harvest Festival showcases various agricultural products for selling and promotion. The festival is a venue to promote the agri-tourism program of the city, creating business-matching opportunities for the people of Tangub City.

TourismEdit

  • Hoyohoy Highland Stone Chapel Adventure Park, is a nature park located on the outskirts of the city, on the foot of Mount Malindang. The park provides a good view of Tangub and the Panguil Bay. Located 850 meters (2788.71 ft) above sea level, the park has a stone chapel, an organic herbal garden, a zipline which is said to be the longest in Asia which connects hills to mountains, and an agricultural learning institute.
  • Memorial Hill, is a small hill located inside the prison reservation compound. This place is a crowd favorite not only because of its breathtaking scenery but also because of its historical significance. This hill has a World War II Vintage Japanese canon. It is also a burial site of Eriberto B. Misa Jr, the famous Prison’s Director from years 1937 to 1949.

Sister citiesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ City of Tangub | (DILG)
  2. ^ "2015 Census of Population, Report No. 3 – Population, Land Area, and Population Density" (PDF). Philippine Statistics Authority. Quezon City, Philippines. August 2016. ISSN 0117-1453. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 25, 2021. Retrieved July 16, 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Census of Population (2020). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
  4. ^ "PSA Releases the 2018 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. December 15, 2021. Retrieved January 22, 2022.
  5. ^ "Tangub: Average Temperatures and Rainfall". Meteoblue. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  6. ^ Census of Population (2015). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  7. ^ Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved June 29, 2016.
  8. ^ Censuses of Population (1903–2007). "Region X (Northern Mindanao)". Table 1. Population Enumerated in Various Censuses by Province/Highly Urbanized City: 1903 to 2007. NSO.
  9. ^ "Province of Misamis Occidental". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved December 17, 2016.
  10. ^ "Poverty incidence (PI):". Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved December 28, 2020.
  11. ^ https://psa.gov.ph/sites/default/files/NSCB_LocalPovertyPhilippines_0.pdf; publication date: 29 November 2005; publisher: Philippine Statistics Authority.
  12. ^ https://psa.gov.ph/sites/default/files/2003%20SAE%20of%20poverty%20%28Full%20Report%29_1.pdf; publication date: 23 March 2009; publisher: Philippine Statistics Authority.
  13. ^ https://psa.gov.ph/sites/default/files/2006%20and%202009%20City%20and%20Municipal%20Level%20Poverty%20Estimates_0_1.pdf; publication date: 3 August 2012; publisher: Philippine Statistics Authority.
  14. ^ https://psa.gov.ph/sites/default/files/2012%20Municipal%20and%20City%20Level%20Poverty%20Estima7tes%20Publication%20%281%29.pdf; publication date: 31 May 2016; publisher: Philippine Statistics Authority.
  15. ^ https://psa.gov.ph/sites/default/files/City%20and%20Municipal-level%20Small%20Area%20Poverty%20Estimates_%202009%2C%202012%20and%202015_0.xlsx; publication date: 10 July 2019; publisher: Philippine Statistics Authority.
  16. ^ "PSA Releases the 2018 Municipal and City Level Poverty Estimates". Philippine Statistics Authority. December 15, 2021. Retrieved January 22, 2022.

External linksEdit