Talk:Twelve Level Cap and Rank System

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WikiProject History (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
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Later ranking systemsEdit

Did this system remain in place through the later periods? The concept of court rankings by number (e.g. "a courtier of the fifth rank") remains even as late as the Edo period, but I would imagine that things had changed from the classical period... or maybe they didn't? Any further, deeper information one can provide on the rankings would be most appreciated. (Is there another article hiding somewhere on Wikipedia that I am simply failing to locate?) LordAmeth 02:26, 24 December 2006 (UTC)

The system of ranks being denoted by colored caps (and clothing) was reformed several times throughout the seventh century. It was expanded to a seven color thirteen rank system in 647, a 19 rank system in 649 and a 26 rank system in 664. In 701, the Taihō Code established a new system of 30 ranks that were denoted by written grants, rather than caps or clothing. And as you note, the system of court rankings continued well after this. This would all make a good basis for expanding this article. I'll work on it when I have some time.-Jefu 16:30, 24 December 2006 (UTC)
Japanese wiki has a category page for this <Category:冠位制度> (Category:Cap Rank System). I'm not sure how much needs to be brought over to en.wiki. It would be nice to have images of the different caps; especially, for people who want to be able to interpret Japanese art and motion pictures (historical drama), or the rank of a nobleman who appears in manga. Do Shinto priests use a different system? Vagabond nanoda (talk) 08:51, 1 July 2021 (UTC)

Hijacked LinksEdit

Whatever their history, the links to "Samurai Wiki" now lead to the "Daynal Institute". Is this a case of someone purchasing a domain name? I propose these links be removed. Unless someone can make a good case for keeping them, I will remove then in one month. (Or, you yourself may remove them.) Vagabond nanoda (talk) 08:46, 1 July 2021 (UTC)