Talk:Spontaneous process

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Diffusion is a spontaneous process that is NOT a chemical reactionEdit

See Diffusion: The process of diffusion, therefore, minimizes thermodynamic Gibbs free energy (though, it is not a chemical reaction), and is thus a spontaneous process (more familiarly known as a "passive" form of transport, rather than "active"). [emphasis added] I'm not sure how this should be reconciled. Should "spontaneous process" be changed to "spontaneous phenomenon" in the Diffusion entry, or should the Spontaneous Process entry be changed to incorporate diffusion? For now, I am simply going to link the entries. --Nick 09:35, 28 March 2007 (UTC)

A spontaneous process can be chemical, mechanical, diffusive, or of any other kind. The defining feature is that it originates from the system itself.145.116.1.211 (talk) 11:17, 17 July 2008 (UTC)

I believe that the following statement is incorrect: "Since a positive enthalpy means that energy is being released to the surroundings, then the 'closed' system includes the chemical reaction plus its surroundings." I would change "positive enthalpy" to "negative change of enthalpy". —Preceding unsigned comment added by 188.248.255.253 (talk) 23:03, 11 June 2010 (UTC)

Agree, all this statement looks bad: "Since a positive enthalpy means that energy is being released to the surroundings, then the 'isolated' system includes the chemical reaction plus its surroundings." And there is a logic fallacy, 1 doesn't imply 2. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 189.130.226.99 (talk) 10:29, 16 June 2011 (UTC)

"Releasing" free energy to the surroundingsEdit

Is it accurate to speak of "releasing" free energy to the surroundings considering that the the delta S term includes energy that is distributed internally (within the system... products and reactants also if the reaction is goes to equilibrium, not to completion). The delta H term measures energy distributed to surroundings but free energy overall... and hence the question of spontaneity... relates to energy distributed both externally to the surroundings AND internally within the system. 64.134.222.173 (talk) 20:14, 11 June 2011 (UTC)

ScienceEdit

What is spontaneous opertion theory 222.127.189.158 (talk) 00:15, 6 September 2022 (UTC)